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1928 Mclaughlin Buick Start Up


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Gentlemen,

 

I am now satisfied that the Buick I bought a month ago is in fact a 1928 Model, not a 1925 as it was advertised. I am indebted to those of you who were able to point this glaringly obvious fact out to me from the get go. All I had to do was get a good look at the Information on the Placard mounted to the Firewall. 

 

I have changed the plugs and wires and the distributor cap and rotor look to be in decent shape, albeit slightly showing their age. My question to you would be, what do the wires from the positive and negative posts on the coil connect to, and furthermore, where should the coil itself be mounted? Mine was sitting loose and the wires disconnected.

 

Next, there is what I can only describe as a precursor to a Solenoid mounted directly on top of the Generator that has loose wires as well. Where should they go before I look to upgrading them as they are somewhat aged as well? I just want to hear this thing fire before I get into detailing it.

 

Next, is fueling. The vacuum tank/pump has a fitting coming off directly above the glass bowl situated beneath it that is not connected to anything. My guess is that glass bowl should house a filter of sorts. I purchased one but it is slightly oversized. On the opposite side there is a similar fitting disconnected from what I believe is the feed line to the carburettor. It is disconnected as well as I suspect someone was trying to force feed it to get it started. I could be wrong.

 

The fueling I should be able to figure out, but can someone please explain if it works on vacuum, what sends the fuel from the vacuum pump before the engine has even started? I see the airline from the intake manifold to the top of the vacuum pump but just can't wrap my head around that detail.

 

For the wiring I could really use some pictures of intact power units pertaining to the details I have described.

 

Thank you all  for any advice in advance,

 

Craig

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The vacuum tank is actually two tanks in one.  The vacuum line (not air line) to the top of the tank creates a vacuum which draws fuel into the upper half of the vacuum tank.  A float in the upper half rises and shuts off the vacuum.  At the same time the float opens a passage to the lower part of the tank and fuel flows by gravity to the carburetor.  The float is constantly rising and falling and is affected by throttle position.  Wide open throttle reduces engine vacuum resulting in low fuel flow.  

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Posted (edited)

The devices on the generator are the "cutout" on the left, which disconnects the generator from the battery when the motor stops, and the spark coil.  That is the original type coil so could be as old as the car. It may work fine too.  The cutout looks to be wired correctly. one wire comes out of the generator, and the other makes it's way to the battery through the amp meter.

The coil receives power at the end with the circular disc on it which is supposed to have a wire resistor in it.  This comes from the ignition switch. The wire on the left end goes to the distributor points. 

Edited by Oldtech (see edit history)
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Posted (edited)

Craig, 

    Attached are 1926 and 1929 wiring diagrams.   The car is negative ground.  A modern coil (like mounted near the generator) should have the negative side wire to the points.  The + side of the coil comes from the ignition switch.

 

The pictures you posted are too small in megapixel to make much out.  

 

This is a vacuum tank.  There is no pump.  It uses manifold vacuum to draw fuel from the gas tank.   The bowl is just a sediment bowl.  You empty the trash out of the bowl occasionally.  The fuel is drawn off above the bowl.   No filter     Hugh

 

706280283_1926BuickWiringdiagram.jpg.61d996855fee4b11cd5e9cf04d9128f6.jpg833116144_1929BuickWiringdiagram.JPG.34cc1ae4646dce4ea4c3158fca09f742.JPG 

 

Edited by Hubert_25-25 (see edit history)
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Re the sediment bowl. The line goes to the carb. If it has two outlets it is for a tractor.  To start these cars after sitting a long time you need to pour some gas into the vacuum tank. There is a plug on top where the line fastens on the banjo fitting for this. It will not suck from the tank on the starter.  If you remember to turn the gas off at the sediment bowl it will stay in the tank for a long time. If you leave it on, over time it will seep out the carburetor.

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On 5/28/2021 at 2:40 PM, Hubert_25-25 said:

Craig, 

    Attached are 1926 and 1929 wiring diagrams.   The car is negative ground.  A modern coil (like mounted near the generator) should have the negative side wire to the points.  The + side of the coil comes from the ignition switch.

 

The pictures you posted are too small in megapixel to make much out.  

 

This is a vacuum tank.  There is no pump.  It uses manifold vacuum to draw fuel from the gas tank.   The bowl is just a sediment bowl.  You empty the trash out of the bowl occasionally.  The fuel is drawn off above the bowl.   No filter     Hugh

 

706280283_1926BuickWiringdiagram.jpg.61d996855fee4b11cd5e9cf04d9128f6.jpg833116144_1929BuickWiringdiagram.JPG.34cc1ae4646dce4ea4c3158fca09f742.JPG 

 

Thanks for the wiring diagrams Hugh, I know they are going to be very helpful,

 

Craig.

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22 hours ago, Oldtech said:

Re the sediment bowl. The line goes to the carb. If it has two outlets it is for a tractor.  To start these cars after sitting a long time you need to pour some gas into the vacuum tank. There is a plug on top where the line fastens on the banjo fitting for this. It will not suck from the tank on the starter.  If you remember to turn the gas off at the sediment bowl it will stay in the tank for a long time. If you leave it on, over time it will seep out the carburetor.

That was exactly my plan, to pour fuel with a lead additive into the vacuum tank where that banjo bolt feeds to it. Then let gravity do the rest.

 

Cheers,

 

Craig.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 6/1/2021 at 10:21 PM, Hubert_25-25 said:

Craig, 

   I just bought a 1928 Buick Reference book, and here is the wiring diagram.    Hugh

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Thanks for that, should be really useful. Looks quite simple really though I do not see a coil in the circuitry anywhere.

 

Craig.

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Hey guys,

 

I figured out how to remove the rims but am stumped when it comes to removing the hubs from the axles. I took off the axle nuts and the retaining rings but they seem stuck on. Is it the brake shoes under tension against the drums that is impeding my ability to just pull them off? Do I have to loosen something on the back side of the brake drums first? Once again guys, I am new to cars of this vintage and don't want to damage anything by being too forceful unnecessarily.

 

Cheers for any advice,

 

Craig

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11 minutes ago, Highlifer said:

Thanks for that, should be really useful. Looks quite simple really though I do not see a coil in the circuitry anywhere.

 

Craig.

Ignition coil is on top of the generator.

 

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Craig,   The photos are too small.  We don't know what model you have.  That will determine how you remove the hubs.  Have you looked into buying a shop manual for your car?      Hugh   

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Re Hubs. Assuming it is a standard and assuming you mean the rear ones... they are on a tapered axle with a key.  So.. Unless someone has a puller for the type of wheel, Possibly Reynolds, that would be best. 

Second best... loosen the nut Flush with the end of the axle, perhaps turn the nut over for good measure. Have your assistant pull out on the wheel and sucker him in to holding a metal plate over the end of the axle. Hit the plate with a heavy sledge. Might take a few times. It should dislodge.  Make sure the wheel is pulled out as you only want the inertia of the wheel against the axle. You don't want to pound on the internals.

If it is a master it's completely different. 

 

Pictures would be an asset.

Edited by Oldtech (see edit history)
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The steel is fairly soft on these old axles and you do not want to impart any hammering on any of the bearings.  If you cannot get a threaded hub puller, I suggest buying a steel double split collar.  You can put a rag, plastic, or aluminum between the collar and the paint.   Many auto part stores loan pullers.      Hugh

 

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Edited by Hubert_25-25 (see edit history)
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