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Can anyone identify this Chevy Stovebolt straight 6?


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I have an old Chevy engine to sell, but first I need to identify it and find an appropriate forum to sell it. Are there members that could assist me? I believe it is a Thriftmaster 235.
I am not a member, but could you please advise me? Thank you so much!
April 

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Others will know better. But I 'think' it is a 235. It has been a long time since I worked on one. My dad had several of them years before he died, and he died more than fifteen years ago.

It doesn't look to me like an early one (1950s?)? His pickup engines had front mounts under the vibration damper, and the '50s car engines had engine mounts on the sides, but near the center, not near the front. 

There were a few '60s variations I am not familiar with, and in the late '60s Chevrolet used some similar engines, but they also looked just a bit different. At least the one in his 1968 station wagon was a bit different.

The transmission looks to be a three speed column shift. However it is different than the late '50s versions his pickups had.

 

I am sure many people here know more than I do. Probably a LOT more.

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Yes, a Stove Bolt style engine. Last used in full size 1962 Chevrolets. 1962 was the introduction year for the lightweight six cylinder blocks. First appeared as 194 in Chevy II. For 1963, full size got the 230. You can tell the difference between a Stove Bolt and the lightweight sixes in distributor location. The one pictured above is center distributor, so Stove Bolt. A lightweight has the distributor near the timing cover. Both have a right side distributor.

 

Earlier Stove  Bolts have valve covers (top one, i.e. rocker cover, not side cover) held on by studs through the top of the valve cover.

 

More here:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chevrolet_straight-6_engine

 

The name came from all the slotted head screws holding the original engine together in 1929, same as those found on wood stoves back then. Once the lightweight blocks came out, there were NO slotted head screws, so they are NOT Stove Bolts! Well, that's how I was taught back in the dark ages!😄

 

 

Edited by Frank DuVal (see edit history)
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On 5/11/2021 at 5:22 PM, Frank DuVal said:

Yes, a Stove Bolt style engine. Last used in full size 1962 Chevrolets. 1962 was the introduction year for the lightweight six cylinder blocks. First appeared as 194 in Chevy II. For 1963, full size got the 230. You can tell the difference between a Stove Bolt and the lightweight sixes in distributor location. The one pictured above is center distributor, so Stove Bolt. A lightweight has the distributor near the timing cover. Both have a right side distributor.

 

Earlier Stove  Bolts have valve covers (top one, i.e. rocker cover, not side cover) held on by studs through the top of the valve cover.

 

More here:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chevrolet_straight-6_engine

 

The name came from all the slotted head screws holding the original engine together in 1929, same as those found on wood stoves back then. Once the lightweight blocks came out, there were NO slotted head screws, so they are NOT Stove Bolts! Well, that's how I was taught back in the dark ages!😄

 

 

The Chevrolet Stove bolt engine was produced from 1929-1936.

The 2nd generation Chevy six is called the Blue Flame six from 1937-1963.

The third generation is from 1962- 1988...We just call it the 3rd generation.

The engine in the picture is one of the 2nd generation

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27 minutes ago, Pfeil said:

The Chevrolet Stove bolt engine was produced from 1929-1936.

The 2nd generation Chevy six is called the Blue Flame six from 1937-1963.

The third generation is from 1962- 1988...We just call it the 3rd generation.

The engine in the picture is one of the 2nd generation

 

Technically true. However, many, many, people continued to refer to the 216 as a "stovebolt" throughout its production years (ending 1954) and beyond. My family and I had a few 216 Chevys back in the '50s and into the '70s as just old cars. Often when we would go into parts stores for some needed item, the counterman would make a comment about our 'stovebolt'. For me the funny thing was, my dad knew the proper distinction, and told me at an early age that the 216s were technically not a stovebolt series, but that the name had somehow stuck to them.

 

Wish I had one running today. The one I would most like would be a 1941 four door sedan, my dad's daily driver when I was really little. Next would be a 1952. I would really like to have my wife's grandfather's four door sedan back. I did not want her to sell it when she did (and she has regretted it for years now). But almost any standard body 1951/'52 car would be fine.

Sorry for the drift.

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5 hours ago, wayne sheldon said:

 

Technically true. However, many, many, people continued to refer to the 216 as a "stovebolt" throughout its production years (ending 1954) and beyond. My family and I had a few 216 Chevys back in the '50s and into the '70s as just old cars. Often when we would go into parts stores for some needed item, the counterman would make a comment about our 'stovebolt'. For me the funny thing was, my dad knew the proper distinction, and told me at an early age that the 216s were technically not a stovebolt series, but that the name had somehow stuck to them.

 

Wish I had one running today. The one I would most like would be a 1941 four door sedan, my dad's daily driver when I was really little. Next would be a 1952. I would really like to have my wife's grandfather's four door sedan back. I did not want her to sell it when she did (and she has regretted it for years now). But almost any standard body 1951/'52 car would be fine.

Sorry for the drift.

 

 When I speak of the Chevrolet six cylinder engine I think of it in truthful technical terms, not in terms of endearment or what people think. 

AACA is a place to set the record straight and stop the myth.

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17 minutes ago, Pfeil said:

 

 When I speak of the Chevrolet six cylinder engine I think of it in truthful technical terms, not in terms of endearment or what people think. 

AACA is a place to set the record straight and stop the myth.

 

A good way to be. However, the myth is part of the history. While getting it right benefits us all, knowing of the myth helps us to understand the truth.

 

(How is that for a dance two-step?)

Edited by wayne sheldon
spotted a typo :( (see edit history)
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6 minutes ago, wayne sheldon said:

 

A good way to be. However, the myth is part of the history. While getting it right benefits us all, knowing of the myth helps us to understand the truth.

 

(How is that for a dance two-step?)

There is no myth about the Gen 1 Chevy six being called a stove bolt- we know why it's called that, the Myth applies to calling a 2nd gen and 3rd generation a Stove bolt which they are not. 

 

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4 hours ago, padgett said:

The first time I head of a "Blue Flame Six" was in reference to the Corvette with triple carbs. Was it used before that ?

YES!  in fact Chevrolet used the term back to 1934, but generally the "NEW" version ( non stove bolt) starts in 1937. In regards to Corvette it's called the Blue Flame Special.

Below is a Non Corvette engine called the blue flame;

See the source image

Below is the Corvette "Blue Flame Special"

Image result for image of blue flame six

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5 hours ago, padgett said:

The first time I head of a "Blue Flame Six" was in reference to the Corvette with triple carbs. Was it used before that ?

 

That is a good question, 1950 was the first year for the 235 offered with the Powerglide only and I found no reference to the engine being referred to as the Blue Flame Six. I have a Dealer Book and it is mentioned as the new revolutionary power system. The 235's were still painted grey in 50

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3 hours ago, John348 said:

 

That is a good question, 1950 was the first year for the 235 offered with the Powerglide only and I found no reference to the engine being referred to as the Blue Flame Six. I have a Dealer Book and it is mentioned as the new revolutionary power system. The 235's were still painted grey in 50

Now you have;

See the source image

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5 minutes ago, John348 said:

 

The 235's were 105 HP from 1950 through 1952, 1953 was introduction of the 125 HP.

1950 was the first year for the 235 offered with the Powerglide only and I found no reference to the engine being referred to as the Blue Flame Six.See the source imageBlue Flame 125 is a six!

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8 hours ago, Pfeil said:
Post Image
Ads for the 1937 Chevrolet touted "the blue-flame principle of fuel combustion" as Chevrolet's answer to increasing efficiency and economy.
 
EVERYONE GOT IT NOW ? This is where the nickname started.

 

I never had noticed any reference to "blue flame technology" used earlier then 1953 until you pointed it out. I always thought that the marketing using the phrase "Blue Flame Six" began in 1953 with the improved oiling system  highlighted by the blue color used on the engines

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Thinking back about over 40 years ago, I had a friend that had a 1955 Chevy pick up with a bad 6 Cylinder engine. A local fellow had a 55 Chevy car that was side swiped in the 1960's that sat in a field on his farm. The car only had around 32,000 or 34,000 miles on it. I was able to buy the car for $25 or 30 Dollars. Pulled the motor out and put it in the pick up. The part I remember the most was the water pump was different between the pick up and the car. I had to press the pulley assembly off of the pick up water pump and press it on the car water pump to make it work. The truck water pump did not interchange with the car engine. It bolted on different as I remember. I always wondered if that would have drove some parts counter guys nuts if, and when, the water pump ever needed replacing. The things that jog ones old memory. After we were done I sold the remains of the car to a local fellow for parts for a 55 Chevy car he had rather than scraping it. Dandy Dave! 

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