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Identity of this car. 1934 Michigan License Plate


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  • Phil Rolffs changed the title to Identity of this car. 1934 Michigan License Plate

Yes, a vane, one-year only model in an attempt by Continental Motors Corporations along with Hayes Body Company to recoup some of their bad debts from the failed DeVaux Motors debacle.  The low-priced four cylinder Beacon was fielded for 1933 and 1934 to no real success, the middle-priced six cylinder Flyer to no popular response.  Their highest-price Ace such as this car, had no chance at all to succeed.  People knew Continental engines but to take a chance on one of their cars in the nadir of the Depression was a chancy proposition. 

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8 hours ago, 58L-Y8 said:

Yes, a vane, one-year only model in an attempt by Continental Motors Corporations along with Hayes Body Company to recoup some of their bad debts from the failed DeVaux Motors debacle.  The low-priced four cylinder Beacon was fielded for 1933 and 1934 to no real success, the middle-priced six cylinder Flyer to no popular response.  Their highest-price Ace such as this car, had no chance at all to succeed.  People knew Continental engines but to take a chance on one of their cars in the nadir of the Depression was a chancy proposition. 

There is a right hand drive Flyer here in NZ - probably a rare variant. And there have been the remains of a couple of Beacons.

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A 1977 Special Interest Autos magazine article stated the serial number manufacturer records showed that for 1933, 4,092 Beacons, 1,746 Flyers and 651 Aces were built.  For 1934, only the Beacon was offered, 983 were sold.  Also noted that abortive attempts by Graham and REO to take over production occurred to no avail.   At $355 for the 1933 Continental Beacon roadster was the almost the cheapest new car available; the 1933 Willys 77 coupe was $335.  Even at those rock-bottom prices, few were brave enough to take a chance on either, particularly the Beacon.  The fear of being stuck with a worthless orphan without parts availability kept them away. 

 

And, If anyone finds a genuine, in-the-metal, 1933 Continental Beacon roadster... 

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