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A plague of Inconsiderate driving that puts other drivers at risk for their lives is rapidly getting out of control.   The only cure is heavy handed police enforcement of existing vehicle laws.  That is unlikely anytime soon.  As a result, I am really cautious and just about fearful to take my 1929 Studebaker out of the garage onto the public roads.

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The article shows a tragic traffic accident with an antique car. In that I agree. 

 

But too extrapolate it to be a trend is not accurate. Its anecdotal.

 

The sky is not falling.

 

I'm always amused at statements like:

 

4 hours ago, rocketraider said:

Sad. The world is full of irresponsible jerks.

 

2 hours ago, Mark Huston said:

A plague of Inconsiderate driving that puts other drivers at risk for their lives is rapidly getting out of control.   

 

The facts are the trends for accidents and deaths per miles driven is lower than ever.  Dramatically so.

Most common reason for an accident:

  • Alcohol. (40%)
  • Speed (30%)
  • Distractions (Cell phone, radio, etc.)

Can we do better? ABSOLUTELY.  

The trends are very much going in the right direction already.

 

1920px-US_traffic_deaths_per_VMT,_VMT,_per_capita,_and_total_annual_deaths.png

 

 

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3 hours ago, 58L-Y8 said:

Not to excuse the hit and run driver but taking a 65 year old car on 495 is taking unnecessary chances with life and limb.

I think it depends on how well the car was put together.

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It was raining

 

It was raining and Arabian said he was driving carefully in the right lane at about 55 mph. Suddenly, a car passed him on the left, sideswiped him and caught the front fender and bumper. His Plymouth spun out and hit the guardrail. 

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Accident doesn't make much sense. This man was in the slow lane, someone passes him in the next lane (#2 lane) then veers right into the slow lane clipping him. Must have been speeding and weaving, a slower car in the #2 lane he wanted to go around by cutting over into the slow lane.

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, Peter Gariepy said:

The article shows a tragic traffic accident with an antique car. In that I agree. 

 

But too extrapolate it to be a trend is not accurate. Its anecdotal.

 

The sky is not falling.

 

I'm always amused at statements like:

 

 

 

The facts are the trends for accidents and deaths per miles driven is lower than ever.  Dramatically so.

Most common reason for an accident:

  • Alcohol. (40%)
  • Speed (30%)
  • Distractions (Cell phone, radio, etc.)

Can we do better? ABSOLUTELY.  

The trends are very much going in the right direction already.

 

1920px-US_traffic_deaths_per_VMT,_VMT,_per_capita,_and_total_annual_deaths.png

 

 


The wonderful thing about our age of instant information is that everything is anecdotal and statistics can be made to justify any position you want to take.  

Edited by Mark Huston (see edit history)
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One of the guys in my scale modeling fraternity was on scene and posted a picture of the aftermath. Sad. I've been on 495, it's usually not very crowded. I've seen old cars on it almost every time (granted, I get up there once a year or less, so small sample size) and it's possible I even saw this car. 

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Well I can say that just yesterday a tow truck hauling a car was weaving in and out of traffic on a four lane near my Dr.'s office and almost took the left front of my Traverse out as well as the car in the left lane just ahead of me. Granted 40 MPH but driving like a fool as a "Professional" driver is really dumb. He never slowed down and almost ran the red light ahead of us.

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Posted (edited)
5 hours ago, 58L-Y8 said:

Not to excuse the hit and run driver but taking a 65 year old car on 495 is taking unnecessary chances with life and limb.

Why the heck are you even posting here? They are made to drive.

Edited by Studemax (see edit history)
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13 hours ago, 58L-Y8 said:

Not to excuse the hit and run driver but taking a 65 year old car on 495 is taking unnecessary chances with life and limb.

Still less deadly in a 65 year old car than being on a motorcycle.

 

Craig

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8 hours ago, Studemax said:

Why the heck are you even posting here? They are made to drive.

Indeed they are, just not on fast four lane roads dense with traffic.  Too many tight situations arise too quickly to affectively react safely with the capability of the vehicle.   Pay your money, take your chances...maybe live to tell about it...maybe not...

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14 hours ago, 58L-Y8 said:

Not to excuse the hit and run driver but taking a 65 year old car on 495 is taking unnecessary chances with life and limb.

 

Sorry, no. Why is this an unnecessary risk? First, these cars went on freeways when they were new. Second, nothing about this was the fault of the old  car driver. Third, you're still far less likely to be involved in an accident on a freeway than on a secondary street.

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12 hours ago, Peter Gariepy said:

But too extrapolate it to be a trend is not accurate. Its anecdotal.

 

The sky is not falling.

 

Peter, while accident and fatality rates are dropping, the fact remains that common courtesy is dying a very rapid death. It only takes a short drive (at any time of the day or night) around any major metro area to witness the "me first" mentality of many drivers on the road. Couple that to the distractions available to these drivers (and I'm talking about the built-in "infotainment" systems in new cars, not just cell phones) and it's a recipe for disaster. My daily commute (back when I had to actually drive to the office) took me past a body shop. Every single car in the lot outside that shop had front and/or rear damage consistent with someone not paying attention in stop-and-go driving. I've personally been cut off in my older cars by people who feel their time is more important than mine and so they must race ahead in the wrong lane and force their monster SUV into the turn lane ahead of me at the last possible minute (likely since they assume that I care about my car and will stop). The fact that these incidents have not resulted in an accident is due to defensive driving - I always assume these morons will do the most idiotic thing possible and plan accordingly.

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I haven't been to Massachusetts in a very long time, but I remember the way the roads were laid out and the driving was very different than what I am use to. Fewer traffic signals, more merging, and lane changing, much more free-form driving. I found it unnerving.

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52 minutes ago, mike6024 said:

I haven't been to Massachusetts in a very long time, but I remember the way the roads were laid out and the driving was very different than what I am use to. Fewer traffic signals, more merging, and lane changing, much more free-form driving. I found it unnerving.


i spent two weeks in and around Boston about five years ago.  That was two weeks of the most white knocked driving of my life. In my nearly 50 years of driving, I have driven all over North America in everything from two cylinder brass cars to big rigs pulling 55 footers or doubles and never experienced what I did around Boston.  That also includes some driving time in a third world country that I can’t mention due to political correctness.   

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1 hour ago, Mark Huston said:


i spent two weeks in and around Boston about five years ago.  That was two weeks of the most white knocked driving of my life. In my nearly 50 years of driving, I have driven all over North America in everything from two cylinder brass cars to big rigs pulling 55 footers or doubles and never experienced what I did around Boston.  That also includes some driving time in a third world country that I can’t mention due to political correctness.   

100% agree, Boston wasted a lot of money on traffic lights and signs, they’re ignored.   Have a daughter that lives there and dread visits, because of the Masshole drivers.  No respect for signs nor who may have the right of way.  Throw in bicycles, and every turn becomes an ordeal.

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30 minutes ago, trimacar said:

100% agree, Boston wasted a lot of money on traffic lights and signs, they’re ignored.   Have a daughter that lives there and dread visits, because of the Masshole drivers.  No respect for signs nor who may have the right of way.  Throw in bicycles, and every turn becomes an ordeal.

You all are killing me. I learned to drive in and around Boston. The trick is to never make eye contact with the other driver at an intersection. If they know you've seen them, it's all over. 😁

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I was driving down the Mass Pike the other day on my way to Logan and a stock Model A passed on the other side.   I've seen everything now.

 

I've been on 495 in a 180 Packard,  Cord 812 SC, and a Auburn 851 SC.    Not really a problem, but those cars will cruise at 65 mph happily.

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4 hours ago, joe_padavano said:

 

...common courtesy is dying a very rapid death.

 

I simply disagree.

 

Yes. There are bad drivers. But no worse 10-20-30 years ago.

 

I'd much rather drive today than anytime in history.  Lower accident rates, lower death rates.  

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Working in New Jersey, I once had a young man working for me who came from Massachusetts.  I told him I thought driving in MA was really scary.  He said:  "You're wrong, Gil.  When I'm driving in MA, I know the guy ahead of me is going to do something stupid.  In NJ, I'm never sure."

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  • Retirement communities/Elderly drivers
  • Bad Roads
  • People on cell phones
  • Inexperienced drives
  • Big rigs/18 wheelers/commercial vehicles
  • Inconsiderate drivers

None of these things are unique to any area of the country. They are everywhere. 

 

Common sense still wins:

  • Drive smart
  • Drive defensively
  • Avoid driving late at night when drunk drivers and driving death rates are at their peak
  • Dont take an antique car never designed for current highway speeds on the highway
  • Know the limits of your vehicle's ability to slow down, speed up, or turn out of a situation

 

 

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16 hours ago, mike6024 said:

It was raining

 

It was raining and Arabian said he was driving carefully in the right lane at about 55 mph. Suddenly, a car passed him on the left, sideswiped him and caught the front fender and bumper. His Plymouth spun out and hit the guardrail. 

Same happened to this 1956 Packard while driving in the rain:  Sad Situation - Studebaker Drivers Club Forum

 

Craig

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40 minutes ago, joe_padavano said:

You all are killing me. I learned to drive in and around Boston. The trick is to never make eye contact with the other driver at an intersection. If they know you've seen them, it's all over.

I learned that at traffic circles, now called roundabouts, in WashDC and just outside Ft Benning GA in the 1960s!

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14 minutes ago, Grimy said:

I learned that at traffic circles, now called roundabouts, in WashDC and just outside Ft Benning GA in the 1960s!

 

In MA those are called "rotaries". Here in the DC metro area, local jurisdictions are installing more and more of them because they don't incur the maintenance cost of traffic lights. Unfortunately, the traffic volume exceeds the capacity of these new traffic circles the day they're completed. Hilarity ensues. It's instructive to note that in MA, they have been removing rotaries and reverting to conventional intersections. There's a reason for that.

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In Rome I swear they line up 6 to 8 abreast at a traffic light on a 4 lane road. Then race for the actual lane when the light changes. Of course they all think their little Fiats are Ferrari’s and most jump the light. It’s just insanity!  

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Rome is manageable.  1) all traffic lights are suggestions 2) Ignore the scooters, they will take care of themselves. 3) Pay attention if the immaculately-uniformed carabineri in the Alfa cop car wants you to go or stop.

 

Now Naples...

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Having traveled much of my business life I learned long ago to let the pro's drive when im in a city I'm not familiar with.  (Boston, NYC, Atlanta, Detroit, Chicago, LA, etc.).  Taxi's and now Uber/Lift. They know the roads better, don't have to deal with parking, pickup and drop-off of rentals, and I get to enjoy the scenery. (ok, NJ outside of Manhattan not so much) :)

 

And taxi drivers can be a colorful bunch of people to interact with. :)

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2 hours ago, Peter Gariepy said:

 

I simply disagree.

 

Yes. There are bad drivers. But no worse 10-20-30 years ago.

 

I'd much rather drive today than anytime in history.  Lower accident rates, lower death rates.  

Peter, I don't know where you are driving but I I've driven up and down the Eastern seaboard for the last 50 years and I can't agree with a single one of your statements and statistics.  There is absolutely NO respect for fellow drivers anymore. The roads are full of punks who think they are playing a video game 1 foot off your bumper front as well as rear! If they are not tailgating you they are seeing how close they can come to you as they pass and cut you off. Part of the problem is our roads are no longer patrolled to catch speeders and aggressive drivers but instead the police are now used as revenue  collectors for local communities  with speed traps preying off the locals for petty fines when they could be out on the interstate actually saving lives. On almost any given day on our interstates  a team of police could empty a full ticket book many of which would be Super tickets with high fines that might save lives as well as fill local coffers.

 

Howard Dennis

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18 minutes ago, hddennis said:

Peter, I don't know where you are driving but I I've driven up and down the Eastern seaboard for the last 50 years and I can't agree with a single one of your statements and statistics.  There is absolutely NO respect for fellow drivers anymore. The roads are full of punks who think they are playing a video game 1 foot off your bumper front as well as rear! If they are not tailgating you they are seeing how close they can come to you as they pass and cut you off. Part of the problem is our roads are no longer patrolled to catch speeders and aggressive drivers but instead the police are now used as revenue  collectors for local communities  with speed traps preying off the locals for petty fines when they could be out on the interstate actually saving lives. On almost any given day on our interstates  a team of police could empty a full ticket book many of which would be Super tickets with high fines that might save lives as well as fill local coffers.

 

Howard Dennis

Dennis,

 

Your observations are 100% correct. You described how bad it is driving in California compared to 50 years ago when I started driving.   Cars are safer today but drivers are not.  

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Courtesy is usually in conflict with traffic rules. "Nice" people are the most dangerous on the road.

 

It is interesting the guy was driving a Plymouth. One of our local career car salesmen was know to have taught his children to drive. He told them to be very cautious when driving near others in a Chrysler product. They had already shown poor judgement in the past.

 

A well respected friend passed that on to me many years ago. And I have not seen any evidence to dispute him. My wife even knows to look how. Every time we get behind some self appointed highway vigilante bent on maintaining the proper speed limit with his pickup she will look at me and say "I know. It's a Dodge". If you don't believe me just check the next slow moving vehicle in front of you. It's the anecdote that makes the rule.-

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1 hour ago, hddennis said:

Peter, I don't know where you are driving but I I've driven up and down the Eastern seaboard for the last 50 years and I can't agree with a single one of your statements and statistics.  There is absolutely NO respect for fellow drivers anymore. The roads are full of punks who think they are playing a video game 1 foot off your bumper front as well as rear! If they are not tailgating you they are seeing how close they can come to you as they pass and cut you off. Part of the problem is our roads are no longer patrolled to catch speeders and aggressive drivers but instead the police are now used as revenue  collectors for local communities  with speed traps preying off the locals for petty fines when they could be out on the interstate actually saving lives. On almost any given day on our interstates  a team of police could empty a full ticket book many of which would be Super tickets with high fines that might save lives as well as fill local coffers.

 

Howard Dennis

 

I simple am not experiencing what you are. Never have.

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32 minutes ago, 60FlatTop said:

Courtesy is usually in conflict with traffic rules. "Nice" people are the most dangerous on the road.

 

It is interesting the guy was driving a Plymouth. One of our local career car salesmen was know to have taught his children to drive. He told them to be very cautious when driving near others in a Chrysler product. They had already shown poor judgement in the past.

 

A well respected friend passed that on to me many years ago. And I have not seen any evidence to dispute him. My wife even knows to look how. Every time we get behind some self appointed highway vigilante bent on maintaining the proper speed limit with his pickup she will look at me and say "I know. It's a Dodge". If you don't believe me just check the next slow moving vehicle in front of you. It's the anecdote that makes the rule.-

 

So now Chrysler product owners are ALL the problem?  Oye.

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41 minutes ago, Peter Gariepy said:

 

I simple am not experiencing what you are. Never have.

 

Like I said I don't know where you are driving but what I described is experienced by many drivers everyday. I remember roughly 15  years ago we were traveling from Georgia to Virginia to visit family over a 4th of July weekend. A truck driver came into the restaurant visibly shaken and announced to everyone that he couldn't believe so many people were willing to die for 10 feet of highway!  It  HAS NOT improved since then.

 

Howard Dennis

 

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24 minutes ago, hddennis said:

 

Like I said I don't know where you are driving but what I described is experienced by many drivers everyday. I remember roughly 15  years ago we were traveling from Georgia to Virginia to visit family over a 4th of July weekend. A truck driver came into the restaurant visibly shaken and announced to everyone that he couldn't believe so many people were willing to die for 10 feet of highway!  It  HAS NOT improved since then.

 

Howard Dennis

 


I’m not saying it’s not happening.  What I’m saying is you are dramatically overstating the problem. 

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