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1911 model 21 carb


dr dirt
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my bad, yes it is a Buick. Hasn't run in several years, always kept in a garage.  I need to get it running so I can take it out and clean it thoroughly. Could be considered a barn find in the current condition. Inherited from my father without much tutoring on how to operate much less maintain.

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According to my records, the 1911 Buick Model 21 came with a Schebler Model D carburetor.

 

I believe the Model D was the very first Schebler (first produced in 1903), and (opinion) probably the finest model carburetor Schebler ever made.

 

Leakage in 1911 was not necessarily a bad thing. Lots of the cheaper carbs (Kingston, Holley, Schebler, Rayfield, etc.) had a "tickler" valve a.k.a. "flooder" valve.

 

To start the cars with a cold engine, the flooder valve was depressed, which depressed the float, flooding the carburetor, and thus forcing a rich mixture.

 

The carburetor should not leak when the engine is running, but not at all uncommon for it to leak once the fuel is turned on before the engine is started, or, after the engine is turned off.

 

Some of the Schebler Model D carbs have a replaceable fuel valve seat; others have the seat machined in the bowl.

 

If the carb is one of the ones with a machined seat in the bowl, the only solution is to re-machine the bowl for a replaceable seat.

 

My Schebler records from this era are far from complete. If this carb is a hold-over from the 1910 Buick Model 19, it does have the seat machined in the bowl. 

 

The carb is quite simple, and if it is the hold-over from the 1910, then other parts (air valve, air valve spring, float, gaskets, etc.) are available.

 

Jon.

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Posted (edited)

Most of us with older Buicks install a quarter turn valve ahead of the sediment bowl or fuel filter. 

Just close the valve when parked.  However, I have often started my Buick without opening that valve......

(My nag-avator now reminds me every time). 🤥

Edited by Mark Shaw (see edit history)
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Look at the nut securing the seat/inlet assembly inside the float bowl to see if there isn't a crack in it from over tightening.  

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