Jump to content

1932 Lincoln KB- V12 Custom Coupe - Coachwork by Judkins


Recommended Posts

I think we might have this already somewhere.  But it is cool enough to get another thread.

 

https://www.prewarcar.com/314068-1932-lincoln-kb-v12-custom-coupe-coachwork-by-judkins

 

  • Chassis #: KB 1635
  • Engine #: KB 1635
  • Mileage: 42,612
  • Transmission: Manual
  • Exterior Color: Ford Dark Tan over Black Fenders w/ Brewster Green Reveals

For offer is an elegant 1932 Lincoln KB with custom coupe coachwork by J.B Judkins. Judkins first came to the market as a small carriage builder in 1857. Judkins produced custom bodies for several prominent manufacturers, but Lincoln was their primary client. Less than 30 examples were built of the ‘32 KB Coupe, with only three still known to exist today.

This Coupe is believed to be the only example in existence with a rear-mounted spare tire. This unique styling offers graceful flowing fenders from front to rear, a completely different look than it’s side-mounted companions. The fit and finish are impeccable including a padded leather roof, foldable windshield, and roll-down rear window. The doors close and latch effortlessly.

From the Greyhound mascot, all chrome finishes are in perfect condition. The luxurious cabin is accented with wool broadcloth, burled hardwoods, a black leather button bench seat, and is suitable for a 6 foot+ driver comfortably. Unique features include an optioned full-size trunk with golf bag storage, overdrive, and Lincoln's power-assisted braking system! The Lincoln underwent an extensive restoration to Concours specifications roughly 10 years ago. It has been meticulously maintained ever since. The undercarriage is as nicely finished as the exterior.

It has been praised for its originality and correctness by numerous Lincoln specialists. This Lincoln was noted for its smooth and extremely quiet engine. One expert even went as far as to say, ‘At idle you could truly balance a quarter on the engine block’. Under the bonnet is secured a thermostat that automatically controls the beautiful louvers stretched down either side of the hood.

Notable mentions include a debut on Wayne Carini’s ‘Chasing Classic Cars’, and a first place Senior Winner judgment at the Classic Car Club of America National Competition. This is a unique opportunity to bring this immaculate 12-cylinder Lincoln to the Concours field for the very first time.

314068-1604398084-9950759.jpg

314068-1604398087-3785704.jpg

314068-1604398088-4343857.jpg

  • Like 8
Link to post
Share on other sites

A great looking car in what appears to be impeccable condition.  I won’t mind having it, however, the $160,000 asking price is a little out of my budget.    

Link to post
Share on other sites

160 is 35 cents on the dollar for a restoration today.............I like the car and would own it in a heartbeat.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, alsancle said:

The luxurious cabin is accented with wool broadcloth, burled hardwoods, a black leather button bench seat,

 

Stunning car and a discount on restoration costs, but am I missing the broadcloth on the interior?   It seem to be all leather to me. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, edinmass said:

...I like the car and would own it in a heartbeat.

 

Ed, you've said, if I'm paraphrasing properly, that

many Classics, especially closed models, are worth

a lot less these days on the market.  So what is your

estimate of its true worth?  Perhaps half the asking price?

Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

John, No..........but that car today would cost a fortune to do well. Certain Marques are not doing well.......compared to others. Personally I like the car a lot, and would add it to my garage, it’s a fantastic platform. Lincoln’s have suffered out of proportion to the rest of the market in my humble opinion.

 

PS- fantastic closed cars are very, very strong. Some selling for much more than open examples.

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
  • Thanks 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

I scrolled thru the pics of this car. So the car is finished beautifully and I assume stock since the seller says its ready for concour. Do guys really screw into the body an award badge? Tell me its double sided tape. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, deaddds said:

I scrolled thru the pics of this car. So the car is finished beautifully and I assume stock since the seller says its ready for concour. Do guys really screw into the body an award badge? Tell me its double sided tape. 

 

It is a requirement of the CCCA that the badge is permanently fixed to the right side of the from 1/3 of the car.    Some cars have hood screens (supercharged Cords, Duesenbergs, Mercedes) where you can less permanently mount it.  Most don't.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

And the all-important contact information, 

copied from the ad, is as follows:

 

Seller:  Redline Restorations (Connecticut)

 

"All reasonable offers and trades are always considered.

For any additional information, feel free to visit our showroom

at 2475 Fairfield Ave, Black Rock, CT 06605, or give us a call

at (203) 335-9555."

 

 

 

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, deaddds said:

So does that count against a guy in judging later since it’s “marring” the surface and not original ?


Never has.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, alsancle said:

It is a requirement of the CCCA that the badge is permanently fixed to the right side of the from 1/3 of the car.   

It is a progressive award system. The badge shows the world that you have achieved this level of competition and having it permanently mounted prevents you from attempting to compete at an entry level again.  

 

It is also a badge of honor, not something anyone would object to. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, m-mman said:

It is a progressive award system. The badge shows the world that you have achieved this level of competition and having it permanently mounted prevents you from attempting to compete at an entry level again.  

 

It is also a badge of honor, not something anyone would object to. 

Also, the car achieved the award and when the award is attached to the car, it goes with the car to the next owner.  

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Well......I’m a CCCA guy......hardcore. Your insane if you think I will drill holes in my cowl for a badge. I make a bracket out of stainless and place the badge on it. I prefer my car as they came from the factory. I’m not interested in placing anyone’s mark on it.........ever.

  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites

That was kinda my thoughts although Im probably as far from that level as it gets. That said, if I ever dropped well over 6 figures in a restoration, I too wouldnt even consider drilling holes in a perfect restoration. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

You think those tires are blackwalls with the white stripe painted on (carved in?) or whitewalls with most of the whitewall painted or coated black somehow? I like the look.

 

I love the car but I have two changes: green leather interior instead of black, and dual rear spares.

 

 

Edited by Matt Harwood (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Matt Harwood said:

You think those tires are blackwalls with the white stripe painted on (carved in?) or whitewalls with most of the whitewall painted or coated black somehow? I like the look.

 

I love the car but I have two changes: green leather interior instead of black, and dual rear spares.

 

 

 

I like the Dual Spare idea,  but not sure the carrier will support it.   There are a couple of 845 Packards with the dual rear spares that look pretty cool.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, edinmass said:

Well......I’m a CCCA guy......hardcore. Your insane if you think I will drill holes in my cowl for a badge. I make a bracket out of stainless and place the badge on it. I prefer my car as they came from the factory. I’m not interested in placing anyone’s mark on it.........ever.

Ok. But you are in the minority.  I’d guess over 90 percent of ccca senior cars have their badge on the cowl, drilled with screws.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

You think those tires are blackwalls with the white stripe painted on (carved in?) or whitewalls with most of the whitewall painted or coated black somehow? I like the look.

 

I love the car but I have two changes: green leather interior instead of black, and dual rear spares.

 

 

That's supposed to be a Wayne Carini trademark. Paints a pinstripe on a blackwall. I think he featured that car in an episode of Chasing Classic Cars.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, Cadillac Fan said:

Ok. But you are in the minority.  I’d guess over 90 percent of ccca senior cars have their badge on the cowl, drilled with screws.  


 

Not anymore...........go to Pebble or Amelia and count the badges you see screwed on to cars the past ten years. What was once commonplace is now frowned upon. It’s not part of the car when new, and it doesn’t belong screwed into the metal of the car. 
 

My senior CCCA doesn’t have the badge on it, and I have never installed it. Placing them on tasteful removable brackets is now the standard norm.........

 

Many collectors routinely remove them now when freshening the cars for the circuit again. 

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, alsancle said:

That is because Pebble and Amelia need to be the first shows a car goes to after restoration.  

 

 

YUP........most times.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...