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Detroit Lubricator / Stewart information needed


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Working on my Detroit Lubricator / Stewart information.

 

I posted in the Graham section, but got minimal response. Trying to match dataplates (bowl covers) to Graham models. Also looking for photos of dataplates from KNOWN original carburetors and the model for ALL Stewart and Detroit Lubricator carburetors except Cadillac and Packard, which I have documented.

 

The Packard dataplates, and the late 1920's Stewart dataplates are coded with a 6 character group of 1 letter and 5 numbers. The letter represents the month that the carburetor was built, the first 2 numbers are the last 2 numbers of the year the carburetor was built, and the next 3 numbers are the carburetor identification number (the "tag number" on modern carburetors). Since Detroit Lubricator and Stewart made running changes, having a complete set of these numbers tells us when a running change took place. As an example:

 

Looking at the 1930 Packard model 726

 

From January 1930-April 1930, carburetor number 753 was used (A-30753, B-30753, C-30753, D-30753)

In May and June number 754

In July number 755

In Aug through mid-September number 756

And finally from mid-September through December number 757

 

There was a minor change at each number break. Of course, the part numbers in the Packard parts book (printed before the car was produced) do not reflect these changes, but we have disassembled sufficient numbers of the Packard carbs to document the changes.

 

If one looks at Graham dataplates, one finds examples such as 653-2, or 849-2 or 612-5.

 

Since Graham produced a 6 cylinder model 53 that came with a Detroit Lubricator carburetor, one could assume (normally a very bad idea) that this plate was used on a model 53 Graham; but what does the 2 mean??? Since most of the plates I have seen have either or 1 or 2 suffix, I first thought MAYBE this referred to the series (to those of us NOT Graham historians, the series 1 and series 2 is quite confusing), but then I found plates 612-5 and 612-6. So these don't correspond with the normal series 1 and series 2.

 

Also working on documentation for all of the Stewart / Detroit Lubricator models. I have literally hundreds of pages that I have collected over the past 50 years, but still a long way from complete.

 

In going through my papers, found this copy that might be of interest to Graham owners:

 

Detroit Lubricator Graham comparison test

 

Currently, I have good documentation on Cadillac, Dodge, Essex from 1924 and newer, Ford, Hudson from mid-1923 and newer, Maxwell, and Packard. I have some documentation on other models, such as Graham, Hupmobile, and Regal. Nothing on Chevrolet (Canada), Colonial, Dixie Flyer, F.R.P., Hollier, Kline, Lozier, New Era, Paige, and Pilgrim (or anyone else, if they were used on any other makes).

 

Any help gratefully welcome!

 

And in the for what its worth category, a tuning tip from Detroit Lubricator "a deviation of 10 or more in a cylinder compression test must be corrected before attempting to adjust a carburetor" ;)

 

EDIT: Just found this in my notes. I really love sales hype: Stewart sales hype

 

Jon. 

Edited by carbking (see edit history)
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20 hours ago, carbking said:

Working on my Detroit Lubricator / Stewart information.

 

I posted in the Graham section, but got minimal response. Trying to match dataplates (bowl covers) to Graham models. Also looking for photos of dataplates from KNOWN original carburetors and the model for ALL Stewart and Detroit Lubricator carburetors except Cadillac and Packard, which I have documented.

 

The Packard dataplates, and the late 1920's Stewart dataplates are coded with a 6 character group of 1 letter and 5 numbers. The letter represents the month that the carburetor was built, the first 2 numbers are the last 2 numbers of the year the carburetor was built, and the next 3 numbers are the carburetor identification number (the "tag number" on modern carburetors). Since Detroit Lubricator and Stewart made running changes, having a complete set of these numbers tells us when a running change took place. As an example:

 

Looking at the 1930 Packard model 726

 

From January 1930-April 1930, carburetor number 753 was used (A-30753, B-30753, C-30753, D-30753)

In May and June number 754

In July number 755

In Aug through mid-September number 756

And finally from mid-September through December number 757

 

There was a minor change at each number break. Of course, the part numbers in the Packard parts book (printed before the car was produced) do not reflect these changes, but we have disassembled sufficient numbers of the Packard carbs to document the changes.

 

If one looks at Graham dataplates, one finds examples such as 653-2, or 849-2 or 612-5.

 

Since Graham produced a 6 cylinder model 53 that came with a Detroit Lubricator carburetor, one could assume (normally a very bad idea) that this plate was used on a model 53 Graham; but what does the 2 mean??? Since most of the plates I have seen have either or 1 or 2 suffix, I first thought MAYBE this referred to the series (to those of us NOT Graham historians, the series 1 and series 2 is quite confusing), but then I found plates 612-5 and 612-6. So these don't correspond with the normal series 1 and series 2.

 

Also working on documentation for all of the Stewart / Detroit Lubricator models. I have literally hundreds of pages that I have collected over the past 50 years, but still a long way from complete.

 

In going through my papers, found this copy that might be of interest to Graham owners:

 

Detroit Lubricator Graham comparison test

 

Currently, I have good documentation on Cadillac, Dodge, Essex from 1924 and newer, Ford, Hudson from mid-1923 and newer, Maxwell, and Packard. I have some documentation on other models, such as Graham, Hupmobile, and Regal. Nothing on Chevrolet (Canada), Colonial, Dixie Flyer, F.R.P., Hollier, Kline, Lozier, New Era, Paige, and Pilgrim (or anyone else, if they were used on any other makes).

 

Any help gratefully welcome!

 

And in the for what its worth category, a tuning tip from Detroit Lubricator "a deviation of 10 or more in a cylinder compression test must be corrected before attempting to adjust a carburetor" ;)

 

EDIT: Just found this in my notes. I really love sales hype: Stewart sales hype

 

Jon. 

 

I have an original installed Stewart on my 29 DB DA6 engine. My truck is more like Graham truck badged as  Dodge Bros. Had it rebuilt by Meyers and runs like a calm.

 

57FF3488-84B2-4211-B487-8E6AF25AE75B.jpeg.7684b525c22e81b3252b16b7a105d186.jpeg1645B93B-64EB-48AA-9EB6-8397EDBA3096.jpeg.618ebf60166d0bfd6482594b129ea632.jpeg

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21 minutes ago, stakeside said:

 

I have an original installed Stewart on my 29 DB DA6 engine. My truck is more like Graham truck badged as  Dodge Bros. Had it rebuilt by Meyers and runs like a calm.

 

57FF3488-84B2-4211-B487-8E6AF25AE75B.jpeg.7684b525c22e81b3252b16b7a105d186.jpeg1645B93B-64EB-48AA-9EB6-8397EDBA3096.jpeg.618ebf60166d0bfd6482594b129ea632.jpeg

Not sure of the data plate you refer to. Got a picture?

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