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1947 Chrysler windsor Starting problems


caddy60s
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For some time I have worked on getting my car started/  It is not drawing fuel from the tank, I have replaced the fuel pump and it has made no difference/  I tried using a one gall fuel tank,

& dropping  a line into that , thinking there may be something going on in the gas tank. there is zero suction.  On the electrical side there is spark & the car will start if I put gas in the carb.

The car will run until the fuel i put into the carb is gone. I am not sure what else to try.  

 

Frustrated

 

Bruce

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Matt has a good idea. Also the fuel line from the pump to the carb could be plugged. My next step would be to take the line from the pump to carb loose and blow through it to confirm it is clear. If clear then reconnect it to the pump and see if the pump will pump from your test can to the open end of the line. If that checks OK the problem is in the carb...  Take it one step at a time! Good luck.

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Bruce, with respect, if your having fuel delivery problems on this car and you can’t easily locate the problem in under ten minutes, you need to get a qualified mechanic to help you. Do NOT pour gas down the throat of the carburetor as it could backfire and throw gasoline on you and burn you severely. This is a common way people get critically injured in the hobby. The good news is you car is just about the easiest car in the world to service and find parts for. Find someone over 60 who can help you that is familiar with carburetors and breaker ignition. The repair should be simple, and not particularly expensive. Finding the right guy is 90 percent of getting the car fixed.

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"Zero suction"???  On some cars, if you don't insert the pumping arm correctly into the engine block, the pump arm can miss the driving cam, and just sit there, not actually pumping as you grind the starter...

Did you work the new pump by hand befroe installing to see if it made pumping sounds??

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3 hours ago, edinmass said:

Find someone over 60 who can help you that is familiar with carburetors and breaker ignition.

Where are you located?

 

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I want to thank all who were good enough to help me with the ongoing problem,   I have some questions if the float was stuck would that interfere with the fuel pump having zero suction?  What in the carb would have an effect on the fuel pump not delivering fuel?  I haven't checked to see if the engine compression is low or 0 would that also have an effect on the fuel pump?  If the timing chain is not operating would that have  an effect on the fuel pump?   I am asking all these questions because, it may give me a direction to go to. I have followed up on the different suggestions and at this stage the car will turn over and start with the little bit of gas I put into the carb and within seconds the car stops.

 

Bruce

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If the float is stuck, the fuel has nowhere to go so the pump, even if it's pulling, won't pull any fuel. We often run into this problem here at the shop where the car will attempt to start but acts like it's out of gas. We add gas to the tank but still no change. Tapping on the side of the carburetor bowl with the handle of a screwdriver will often knock the floats loose and voila! It's running again.

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It might be helpful to unbolt the pump from the block, keeping it connected to the tank, but disconnect it from the carburetor. Work the lever by hand, and see if it pumps fuel. Sometimes a priming doesn't hurt to get things started.

If it works OK, then you may have to install the pump on the engine more carefully, to make sure that the lever is resting on the camshaft lobe. When installed correctly, the lever will be spring loaded by tightening the mounting bolts.  

If it doesn't pump by hand, then you can start narrowing down the possibilities. 

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Something to try that may (or may not work):

 

Fill the bowl of the carburetor with fresh fuel through the bowl vent, until fuel begins to run out somewhere. Leave it overnight before attempting to start the engine.

 

WHY?

 

As Matt mentioned, the float (or the fuel valve) in the carburetor may be stuck. Modern fuel, when it evaporates, leaves a gooey film akin to glue! But modern fuel is also an excellent solvent. Thus if the float is stuck, the full bowl might free up the float. If it doesn't, you have wasted half a teacup of fuel, and 12 hours of down time. If it works, then you have saved more frustration.

 

If this doesn't work, then checking the fuel pump output would be (to me) the next logical step.

 

Jon.

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I would like to thank everyone who have put forward there information on the starting problem on my 47 Chrysler.  I did fill the carb bowl as suggested left it for 12 hours, and if it was stuck it isn't now?  The next thing was to take the fuel pump out & make sure the that it is connecting on to the lob as it should be. I tried starting the car but still no luck.  more than half way down undrer the car I had to replace a bad section of gas line with the rubber gas line. I took the line apart and put one end in a 1 gal gas can and started the car .  My thoughts are that the rubber gas line is squeezing to gether with the suction of the fuel pump.  I have found a place that has a higher grade of rubber gas line and will replace it in the next few days.  So now I know the car starts and runs its just a matter of getting it to draw gas from the  fuel tank.

Regards Bruce

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Bruce - suggestion: REPLACE THE RUBBER LINE WITH METAL AS SOON AS POSSIBLE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

A rubber "vibration loop" is pretty much normal, but rubber line under the car is asking for trouble. All is takes is one rock.

 

Don't know if you can get a preformed line or not, but, depending on your skills, might be worth trying.

 

If not, there are a number of relatively inexpensive tubing benders (I personally like the Blue Point one) available, and metal line may be acquired at your FLAPS.

 

(Opinion) This is a more important issue than getting the engine running.

 

But certainly glad you found the problem. Congratulations!

 

Jon.

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 Disconnect the line under the car and after removing the gas cap, blow low pressure air into the line. This may clear out the line.

 As for replacing the rubber hose, purchase high pressure fuel injector hose and secure it with 4 clamps placed 2" apart on the steel line.

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