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Best Value in a Roadster


John Bloom
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He also bought the 640 roadster in this thread:

 

https://hymanltd.com/vehicles/7021-1929-packard-640-roadster/

 

 

 

On 5/22/2021 at 12:25 AM, John Bloom said:

A nice looking roadster sold yesterday. Not sure if the guys there saw this one. If so, I wonder what they thought of the hammer price. 
 

the color scheme doesn’t wow me, but it doesn’t turn me off either. image.jpeg.2c77a330137d4e52ff70955b22645d32.jpeg

 

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  • 3 months later...

1922 Wills St Claire Model A-68 Rumble-Seat Roadster

1922 Wills St Claire Model A-68 Rumble-Seat Roadster

Click photo for MORE Photos

Restored in the 90’s in SoCal, the motor was overhauled in 2010 by Tom Leib in Los Angeles. Runs great, will need the new manifold installed (new 15K part is included)

Interior upholstery and rumble seat excellent.

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The powerplant is so cool. Jack Passey said in his book that by the time the Wills St Claire cars reached the secondary market most mechanics were quick to dismiss the engines, considering them overly complicated quackery and rarely took the time to understand them. He had a handful of them but I seem to recall him saying that two of the Wills Saint Claire he found had had their engines replaced with something more simple. This is a marque that I've always had a lot of enthusiasm for but rarely have had the occasion to see. Same goes for Cunningham.

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I lusted after a nice Cunningham for years.......finally drove three of them. And that was enough to scratch that itch. The Wills is an “engineers car” and it’s not for everybody. Like a Ghost or Phantom 1, you need gasoline in your veins to enjoy them. Too much complicated under hood machinery for the horsepower they deliver. But they are interesting cars. The coachwork leaves something to be desired when you look at the price range when new.

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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hmmmmm, best buy for a roadster.  Looking at this another way.  For the money, buy a Model A Ford and if you don't like the performance, be a kid again and add on all the mechanical upgrades available for the Model A and you will still have a roadster, pretty little car and likely the best buy for the money.  Don't hang me too high that I can't reach the ground with my feet.  (I absolutely like the big stuff)!

Al

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19 hours ago, alsfarms said:

hmmmmm, best buy for a roadster.  Looking at this another way.  For the money, buy a Model A Ford and if you don't like the performance, be a kid again and add on all the mechanical upgrades available for the Model A and you will still have a roadster, pretty little car and likely the best buy for the money.  Don't hang me too high that I can't reach the ground with my feet.  (I absolutely like the big stuff)!

Al

Al, there will be no hanging!  There is a lot to love about a model A roadster. I would welcome one in my garage!  Your comments made me think again about the original question and analysis......  what about the “almost classics”?   Not CCCA approved models but still roadsters from that 1925-1931 era with a decently long wheelbase (say 118 in or more), a well developed strong engine, and great looks.  I’m thinking Studebakers (not the President), Buick’s 6 cyl, little Marmon, Nash, Chrysler, Hudson, REO.....

 

Buick has several roadster models from that era before their Straight 8 that aren’t classics, but very handsome


 

image.jpeg

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I, at one time, owned a 1927 Marmon 4 passenger Speedster.  Not a roadster, but sure had a nice body design, 6 wire wheels and an eight cylinder engine that ran very good giving the car very good performance.  The same can be said about the Locomobile Junior 8, the smaller series Chryslers, Nash and etc.  In some aspects, these smaller (non classics) have better body lines and look more sporty than the long wheelbase classics.

Al

Edited by alsfarms
Clarity (see edit history)
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On 11/12/2021 at 1:06 PM, alsfarms said:

hmmmmm, best buy for a roadster.  Looking at this another way.  For the money, buy a Model A Ford and if you don't like the performance, be a kid again and add on all the mechanical upgrades available for the Model A and you will still have a roadster, pretty little car and likely the best buy for the money.  Don't hang me too high that I can't reach the ground with my feet.  (I absolutely like the big stuff)!

Al

Shhh Al!  A poorly kept secret especially in a '30 - '31.  Proportions in my mind are just about perfect.    But I do love so many other great roadsters discussed here!! 😊 

2017-07-09 21.21.33.jpg

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  • 1 month later...

John, if you are including cabriolets in your search, I find it very hard not to fall in love forever with a Cord L29!

They are beautiful car, with every square inch of it styled to the hilt.  They have excellent hydraulic brakes, the ride and handling is phenomenal for a 1929 car, and if it has highway gears installed, it will very comfortably and easily roll down the road at 55 mph plus. A good ACD car generally is a wise investment long-term as well.

269789786_2998331360439808_1399018530829792997_n.jpg

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1 hour ago, Hemi Joel said:

John, if you are including cabriolets in your search, I find it very hard not to fall in love forever with a Cord L29!

They are beautiful car, with every square inch of it styled to the hilt.  They have excellent hydraulic brakes, the ride and handling is phenomenal for a 1929 car, and if it has highway gears installed, it will very comfortably and easily roll down the road at 55 mph plus. A good ACD car generally is a wise investment long-term as well.

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Hey Joel, thanks for breathing some new life into this thread.  I have not stop thinking about roadsters but with the busyness of life I haven’t swung back around here to take the dialogue any further. I could not agree with you anymore about the beauty of a Cord L29 Roadster.  The lines are just perfect.

 

the Hayes bodied L29 Might be the most beautiful car to me visually

image.jpeg.f693d4fe2bdcb74dc4ad57a2aaafb881.jpeg


my thread initially was to think through what options might be out there, with the pros and cons of each of them, that could be a realistically bought for $100,000. I love your suggestion, but I know it is way north of 100 grand.  Is that your cord Roadster?

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John, yes I am the fortunate owner of the L29 pictured. They are a bit higher than your target price, but no where near what a Model J would cost, and a great value I think. There are a lot of great cars in this thread. Hopefully you find the car of your dreams! 

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  • 2 weeks later...
1 hour ago, vintagerodshop said:

I would like to encourage you to look at some of the Moon products. My Diana is a joy to drive. has a unique look and I never see another one out on the road when driving.

 

IMG_2850.JPG

I know very little about Moon offerings...I'm guessing here so help me out.  1926?  wheel base?  Tell me more about your good looking Roadster.  What is the model and specs?  Any more pics?

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22 hours ago, John Bloom said:

I know very little about Moon offerings...I'm guessing here so help me out.  1926?  wheel base?  Tell me more about your good looking Roadster.  What is the model and specs?  Any more pics?

The Specifications Book of U.S. Cars 1920-1929, Edited by G Marshall Naul list the following larger series:

1923-'26 Moon 6-58 London, 6, 241.6 ci, Continental 8R, L-Head, 128" wheelbase, $1,785-$2,585.

Gone for 1927. 

1928 Moon Aerotype 8-80, 8, 268.6 ci, Continental 15S, L-Head, 125" wheelbase, $1,845. This became the Windsor White Prince for 1929-'30.

One does suspect finding a larger series Moon might be a challenge.

 

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That's what I've heard, but don't remember even thinking about it when I had the opportunity to drive a 22 6-40 a year ago. I wouldn't let it keep you from looking at one. The bigger problem is that Moon roadsters don't come up for sale often. Last year a touring converted to a roadster was sold. Other than that I think there is a Windsor cabriolet for sale within the club. 

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On 1/7/2022 at 7:34 PM, prewarnut said:

Isn't the issue with Moon is that it's real tight behind the wheel?

I cant comment on some of the other Moons, But I know that the Diana I have is pretty reasonable for space. I am 5 11 and 235 pounds. Wide through the shoulders.

It has a Continental straight 8 that a regular moon did not see. Also equipped with hydraulic brakes which makes for the braking experience to be exciting! you never know when your going to spring a leak.lol

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  • 3 weeks later...

Because I'm interested in someday having a Roadster, I'm always looking.  World Wide Auctions had an 840 Roadster that was very nice looking and when it went across last week at Scottsdale, it bid to 220, and stopped and they pushed it off unsold for not meeting reserve.  They mentioned it had "upgrades", which they said was done to some late 8 series cars (grill and headlights and others).  It wasn't clear to me if this was done at the factory and was accepted as correct or if someone after the fact put them on because they thought it looked better.  Did anyone see this car go across?  It had me wondering what the relative price points are on a 640, vice 740, vice 840 Roadster.  It seems like it can get pretty complicated.  Was the specific car originally a roadster or has it been rebodied, obviously condition and ownership history.   Who in the Packard world can educate me on the relative merits and value between the 6-8 series roadsters?  I love the 133 inch wheelbase versions of these series also.  Are these series all about equal in perceived value or is one much more appreciated by Packard collectors and priced above the others?  

 

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Upgrades on that car are probably referring to a later trans with synchromesh, a down draft carb, high speed rear end, ext............I have no clue as the body/chassis issue. That said, never, ever buy ANY open car without an expert......a real expert, not an internet type. If you cant trace the history of ANY open Packard back to 1955...........don't buy it. 

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9 minutes ago, edinmass said:

 

Upgrades on that car are probably referring to a later trans with synchromesh, a down draft carb, high speed rear end, ext............I have no clue as the body/chassis issue. That said, never, ever buy ANY open car without an expert......a real expert, not an internet type. If you cant trace the history of ANY open Packard back to 1955...........don't buy it. 

Thanks Ed, I am getting educated slowly....  Your advice is well taken in particularly on higher end cars that offer tremendous upside from being altered without being discovered.  I suppose the risks are minimal in a 7 passenger sedan that is still a seven passenger sedan.  I am suspicious of all high end open cars of the era.

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2 hours ago, John Bloom said:

Because I'm interested in someday having a Roadster, I'm always looking.  World Wide Auctions had an 840 Roadster that was very nice looking and when it went across last week at Scottsdale, it bid to 220, and stopped and they pushed it off unsold for not meeting reserve.  They mentioned it had "upgrades", which they said was done to some late 8 series cars (grill and headlights and others).  It wasn't clear to me if this was done at the factory and was accepted as correct or if someone after the fact put them on because they thought it looked better.  Did anyone see this car go across?  It had me wondering what the relative price points are on a 640, vice 740, vice 840 Roadster.  It seems like it can get pretty complicated.  Was the specific car originally a roadster or has it been rebodied, obviously condition and ownership history.   Who in the Packard world can educate me on the relative merits and value between the 6-8 series roadsters?  I love the 133 inch wheelbase versions of these series also.  Are these series all about equal in perceived value or is one much more appreciated by Packard collectors and priced above the others?  

 

I think they are referring to 1932 upgrades done at the dealership to make left over 1931 cars appear like 1932 models.  

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24 minutes ago, Cadillac Fan said:

I think they are referring to 1932 upgrades done at the dealership to make left over 1931 cars appear like 1932 models.  

That is what they implied and I wondered how official and approved that was by Packard.  Thanks.  

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1 minute ago, John Bloom said:

That is what they implied and I wondered how official and approved that was by Packard.  Thanks.  

I don’t know if there was a official update package from the factory or one dealer updated this particular car on their own.  I am sure the Packard people know one way or another.  

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  • 1 month later...
  • 4 weeks later...

Chicago winter weather is dragging on......  I am undaunted and looking forward to spring weather (a little sunshine and the upper 50's would be fine).  With the anticipation of spring, it is hard to not think about top down motoring.  I am back thinking through my dreams of a Roadster.  A couple that I've been admiring have been mentioned earlier on this thread, but I want to circle back to two that seem to be contemporaries and get some of your thoughts if you have any experience with either model.  Specifically the 1931 Buick model 90 sport roadster, and the 1931 Studebaker President series 80 state roadster.  

 

Both of these full Classics are very handsome, and although they come from the upper portion of mid-priced marques (Buick and Studebaker), they are great looking models that look to have been a value when compared to some of the roadster offerings of Packard, Pierce, Cadillac, Lincoln, Chrysler Imperial.  

 

The Buick 90 series sport roadster was listed for 1610 dollars.  It road on a 132 inch WB and had a 344.8 cubic inch straight 8. It weighed 4010 pounds. 

 

The Studebaker President series 80 roadster listed for 1900 dollars.  It road on a 130 inch WB and had a 337 cubic inch straight 8.  It weighed 4130 pounds.  Studebaker had a 90 series wtih a 136 inch WB but I don't believe they offered a roadster model in that series?  

 

Two great marques that I've heard have very good club support.  I wonder what experience some of you might have with these two models.  Have you owned one?  Driven or ridden in one?  Seen any models at concours/shows?  What are your thoughts on these two cars that seem like fairly comparable peers?  

 

Both fabulous looking to me.

 

 

image.png.16f008467dbdb677868b5f4ec36d1fca.png 

 

image.png.d3e0435e679a8872d599f6bebc8afaac.png 

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image.png.01499b6925a07f16d58b200413fe7d0b.png 

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I am lucky enough to have a nice range of cars, including Lincoln roadster, LaSalle roadster, Packard

roadster, Marmon roadster, even a Rolls and a Cad 16 roadster. My 31 Stude President Four Seasons

roadster is a great car. It runs a 9 main bearing eight (aka Pierce), has a fold down windshield and

low drop doors and a low top when down, but also has window as a convertible coupe does. It is

very easy to drive and is capable of freeway speeds and long distance touring. For the price, it is

a wonderful car.  I highly recommend them.

 

Johnny

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On 4/3/2022 at 1:06 AM, jcrow said:

I am lucky enough to have a nice range of cars, including Lincoln roadster, LaSalle roadster, Packard

roadster, Marmon roadster, even a Rolls and a Cad 16 roadster. My 31 Stude President Four Seasons

roadster is a great car. It runs a 9 main bearing eight (aka Pierce), has a fold down windshield and

low drop doors and a low top when down, but also has window as a convertible coupe does. It is

very easy to drive and is capable of freeway speeds and long distance touring. For the price, it is

a wonderful car.  I highly recommend them.

 

Johnny

Your car when finished.

11362.jpg

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