Jump to content
Rebuilding Search Index - searches will be incomplete until sometime in the morning of 6/11/21. ×

How Do I Keep Mice Out of My Glove Box?!?


carbdoc
 Share

Recommended Posts

Mice have been nesting in the glove box of our 1987 BMW 325e on a regular basis for some time now.  I clean them out, and back they come (perhaps they never "left" but simply migrated elsewhere in the car; I don't know).  The car in question is an HPOF vehicle and it is actually driven fairly often, so this is even more of a mystery to me . . . and I don't seem to have this problem with our other cars.

So:  what can I put in the glove box (or anywhere in the car) that will keep them out?  I would rather not go the "mothballs route" if possible.

 

Jeff Dreibus

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks, guys.  I was thinking more along the lines of repelling them rather than killing them since I don't want them to die in an inaccessible part of the car, but these products could be a possibility if I can't come up with anything else. 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

A dead mouse in your car won’t smell. A living one will. Kill them fast. Don’t put pelletized bait in the car. They’ll carry it all to their food storage area and often it’s places like your heater/defrost ducts. As me how I know! I had blue pellets flying out of my AC vents one summer when I put it on high. Also, remove any nesting material in your car. I used to keep a roll of paper towels in my dually and one time found the roll shredded and all in my glove box. They will eat papers in your glove box also so get rid of those. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Dave39MD said:

I have been using Fresh Cab but it does have a strong evergreen kind of smell. 

I bet it's got clove oil or peppermint in it.  Those would be common likely active ingredients.  My mother in law grew up on the farm and buys raw clove oil and puts it around their sheds and that keeps them out  of the interior and out from under....

Edited by Str8-8-Dave (see edit history)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I found mice nest in my 89 F-150 glove box. They get in through rust hole. I leave the glove box door open. No more mice, most likely went somewhere else.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Dave39MD said:

When they go outside full of poison you can also kill a cat, dog, hawk, or other critter you really don't want to poison.

 

Dave

 

The serious shortage of owls in this district has been put down to them eating poisoned rodents. And despite allowing a couple of large poisonous snakes to live in the garden, I usually still have to trap some mice in Autumn, when they try to move inside. Those pesky little critters just keep doing their own thing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 4/28/2021 at 7:23 AM, chistech said:

A dead mouse in your car won’t smell. A living one will. Kill them fast. Don’t put pelletized bait in the car. They’ll carry it all to their food storage area and often it’s places like your heater/defrost ducts. As me how I know! I had blue pellets flying out of my AC vents one summer when I put it on high. Also, remove any nesting material in your car. I used to keep a roll of paper towels in my dually and one time found the roll shredded and all in my glove box. They will eat papers in your glove box also so get rid of those. 

chistech, I disagree about the absence of dead mouse odor.  I once had a 1961 Chrysler that smelled so badly that I could hardly stand to drive it; I eventually found the huge vacant nest (complete with dead "resident") beneath the rear seat.  I removed it; problem solved.

 

Thanks, Dave.  They have also nested in our HVAC blower plenum, so I am familiar with this problem as well.  They use the car's own interior insulation material as well as paper napkins kept in the glove box for material; no more napkins in there now.  You and Graham Man bring up an excellent point:  I don't want them leaving the car with a belly full of poison and potentially poisoning my cats or wildlife.

 

Jeff

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Place traps with peanut butter as bait - outside the car.

If you or a neighbor have pets (dogs or cats especially) they could die because they've eaten the sick or dead mouse.

It happens more often than you might think.

 

 

Bill

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 4/29/2021 at 1:55 PM, carbdoc said:

chistech, I disagree about the absence of dead mouse odor.  I once had a 1961 Chrysler that smelled so badly that I could hardly stand to drive it; I eventually found the huge vacant nest (complete with dead "resident") beneath the rear seat.  I removed it; problem solved.

 

Thanks, Dave.  They have also nested in our HVAC blower plenum, so I am familiar with this problem as well.  They use the car's own interior insulation material as well as paper napkins kept in the glove box for material; no more napkins in there now.  You and Graham Man bring up an excellent point:  I don't want them leaving the car with a belly full of poison and potentially poisoning my cats or wildlife.

 

Jeff

It wasn't the rodent's body stinking, it was the nest along with the urine and ex cremate in it. The rodent's body will dry right up to the skeleton with virtually no odor. I've found many mouse skeletons in people's cars and they never knew they were there. The carcass basically gets petrified. Actually, mouse urine can make you very sick so it's essential to keep them from making a long term habitat out of your car.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not sure if I believe the poisoned rodents are causing many other deaths. The poison causes the rodent to bleed to death. They do not die immediately but start to get ill, often retreating to their nest to die in it. Can a mouse be caught on it's way to the nest with a full stomach, possibly but not a lot. Many birds of prey actually eviscerate their food before eating it and don't even bother with the entrails, which would contain the pelleted poison. In most cases where the birds of prey are daying, its because they're getting into the poison directly. They do say they can get it indirectly but in most cases I'm willing to bet its rare. Think of all the house cats that would be constantly dying. A mouse in your garage doesn't venture much past your garage. I'm not saying it can't happen but it's not as common as they would like you to believe. I have many hawks and owls in the woods behind my home. Twice now I've seen rabbits picked up live, and eviscerated while the hawk is in flight, both times with the entrails coming down on my driveway. the hawk then retreats to it's nest to eat the meat only.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, AutoMechanic said:

Irish Spring soap will keep them and many other rodents away. 

Unfortunately, it will also keep ME away from the ca's interior; I can't stand the smell of that soap, either! 😄

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Try Animal b gonMax by Ortho.  I've used for the last three years.  Have not seen/heard a rat or mouse in my garage since I started using it.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bounce dryer sheets don't work. Your car will smell good for a short time but I have seen chewed up dryer sheets in mouse nests so apparently they like it too. One thing that does work is Mothballs but I would highly discourage that method. I bought a car a few years ago and the previous owner had dumped "A LOT" of mothballs in the interior for longtime storage. Even after an extensive cleaning the fumes were so strong I'd get a headache after 10 minutes of driving. That car has been repeatedly cleaned, aired out, ozone gassed, Fabreeze treated and three years later after a day or two of being closed up you can still smell mothballs.  I think I would have rather had the mouse pee.

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, carbdoc said:

dictator27, how does the Animal b gon max smell?

Animal bgon is synthetic cat pee.  To a human nose there is no smell, but to an animal there is.  We have been having a problem with our mini schnauzer peeing constantly on a corner of our raised herb garden.  Spritzed some Animsl bgonMax on it and he avoids it now.   He does it at the other end! 🤔  More Anima bgonMax coming.  One application lasts quite a while when done per the instructions.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sure fire method to keep them from nesting in a glove box. Remove the glove box.😉

 

The door has to stay closed to keep the light out on higher end cars. Keeping it open does help, removing the interior box works everytime.

 

I didn't say it was convienient....😆

 

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

For years we had a mouse problem in our house every Fall. Suddenly a few years ago the mice disappeared.  Didn't see a mouse for several years. A year or so ago I ventured down into the unfinished basement and found a fat Black Snake in the dirt floored crawl way.  He's still there and seems happy and well fed.  Please don't tell Wife.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 minutes ago, Restorer32 said:

For years we had a mouse problem in our house every Fall. Suddenly a few years ago the mice disappeared.  Didn't see a mouse for several years. A year or so ago I ventured down into the unfinished basement and found a fat Black Snake in the dirt floored crawl way.  He's still there and seems happy and well fed.  Please don't tell Wife.

So there's the answer: Everyone put a fat Black Snake in your car. No more mice, no more back seat driving wife, and probably a theft deterrent! Perfect plan!🤣

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Restorer 32, I will give this method a try!  Since the car is my wire's, I will "accidentally" forget to tell her that I have placed the black snake inside.  This should result in a good story . . . and a good beating for me! 😆

 

Jeff

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've seen countless anecdotes about Irish Spring, or Bounce, or what-have-you over the years.  I finally did some research and found some decent experiments what were performed with controls that debunked the usage of these items.  They don't really work very well.

 

They also tested peppermint oil, and it actually turned out to work pretty well.  Of course, it'll need freshening up to maintain adequate potency. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...