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The future and past for Chrysler


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Recent discussions on our forum and an April Car & Driver column entitled "Educated Guess" which was anything but that, really got me thinking about our cars going forward.  The columnist was urging Stellantis to drop the Chrysler brand, one of his reasons being that they might import some PSA models as Chryslers.  He said "Done wrong, that could mean badge engineering of the Chrysler TC by Maserati sort."  Where to start?  First the TC is about as far from being "badge engineered" as any car can be.  It may share a platform with some other Mopars, but it does not have a rebadged partner vehicle like say the Volare/Aspen or Celebrity/6000/Century/Ciera.  Second, if mere platform sharing is your criteria for badge engineering then just about EVERY current Toyota fits the description.

 

It just seems too many people take gratuitous shots at the TC.  Why?  When new, there were some justifiable criticisms:  1).  It was too expensive - okay, guilty as charged, but how is that a problem 30 years later?  Seems to me , if anything, it's a plus!  2).  Too many parts shared with Chrysler & GM vehicles - again, 30 years later, that's a plus.  3).   Too many parts are one-off and hard to find (so what's the problem -parts are too common or too rare?) - I have not had any problems finding parts for my 16V cars as there are quite a few vendors, many of them on this forum who keep us supplied.  4).  Poor quality control - again that may have been true 30 years ago, but a lot of that related to the automatic transaxles and the Teves brakes which have either been sorted out or have decent work-arounds.

 

If you want a stylish, comfortable and, yes, reliable, convertible that won't break the bank and will appreciate in value, what are your options?

 

 

 

 

 

If you want a modern, comfortable convertible what better option is there than a TC?

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There was the PT Cruiser Convertible 2004-2008, Sebring convertibles 1996-2008, 1991-93 Shadow convertibles, Chrysler 200 convertibles and the Lebaron convertible 1987-95.

 

Never drove any of these so have no opinion on them at all.

 

The Lebaron convertibles were super popular and very few hardtops were built in comparison to the drop tops.

 

Chrysler is not in the convertible market anymore even though you would have thought they would do a Challenger convert... but nope!

Edited by marty mopar (see edit history)
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The TC is one of the most hated on cars. I’ve taken mine to a few shows any see people bust out laughing when they get to my car. I’ve even had people disrespect the car to my face but then my Chrysler minivan with a turbo or omni would draw swarms of people. So what makes the TC have the total opposite reaction. “Maserati” I wonder if Maserati dropped the ball by not throwing in a V8 and making it rwd. It would’ve had a very different stigma. 

Btw has anyone ever seen their Biturbo? That was a huge flop if you ask me. I’d take a TC over a Biturbo any day hands down. 

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11 hours ago, Nile said:

 

It just seems too many people take gratuitous shots at the TC.  Why?  When new, there were some justifiable criticisms:  1).  It was too expensive - okay, guilty as charged, but how is that a problem 30 years later?  Seems to me , if anything, it's a plus!  2).  Too many parts shared with Chrysler & GM vehicles - again, 30 years later, that's a plus.  3).   Too many parts are one-off and hard to find (so what's the problem -parts are too common or too rare?) - I have not had any problems finding parts for my 16V cars as there are quite a few vendors, many of them on this forum who keep us supplied.  4).  Poor quality control - again that may have been true 30 years ago, but a lot of that related to the automatic transaxles and the Teves brakes which have either been sorted out or have decent work-arounds.

 

Nile, your #1, 2, 3, and 4 were not the main reasons 'Chrysler's TC by Maserati' received those "Gratuitous Shots".

#1 was it was too late to the market. There is a reason why the first Shop Manual was for a 1988 year model. In reality, it should have been introduced as a 1987 year model, to attract customers to the showroom where its look-alike sister, the LeBaron convertible had a fresh new look that year. That is also reason #2. It looked like a LeBaron!  

"Too many parts shared with Chrysler & GM vehicles?", that's a funny one, IT IS A CHRYSLER!  Every other Chrysler product shared those same common parts, that's what makes them Chrysler products and Chrysler cars have used some GM components such as steering columns, P/S pumps and others for years before the TC.

"Poor Quality"? If you compare the TC with the LeBaron, the winner of the poor quality award would be the cheaper built LeBaron. The TC is actually higher quality than any other 1989-1991 Chrysler built car.

"Too many parts are one-off and hard to find" You Nile, are showing the public the best part of the one-of RARE and UNIQUE qualities of the TC, the unique 16 valve DOHC engine and Getrag transmission. FAST, isn't it?

As for the ABS brakes, parts were available for 2 decades easily, though hard to find these days. If owners would flush the brake fluid every few years and replace the Accumulator every 10 years, ABS problems would have been cut to a minimum.

We even see it every time a TC is photographed 'For-Sale' or on display, under the hood sits an original Accumulator. Just look at the one for sale currently. 

What 30+ year old car is not difficult to find parts for?

As for the automatic transaxle behind the 90 - 91 TC with the 3.0L engine, that Ultradrive transaxle should not have been introduced before the "bugs" had been revealed and corrected. They could have used the 3 speed automatic with the 3.0L as they did in many of the other models such as the Voyager and Caravan, but the NEW 4-Speed Ultradrive transaxle sounded so much more 'Modern'. That was mistake and a universal 'disaster' in all the Chrysler models where it was used. It took many years after the TC was out of production before the 604/41TE was worth having in an automobile. The 62TE used today is a much improved sister, now with 6 forward speeds.

Most of us who own a TC are proud and happy to be driving such a unique, low production, Classic Automobile. Some of us are even members of the Exclusive Club for just this a car, the TC America Club. See you members in the club in September.

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Car and Driver strikes again. That rag needs to die. Sorry, but they have have some REALLY crap editorials and have actually conspired to "kill" cars in the past (see Mosler Consulier). Let's hope Stellantis uses their pages to wipe in the bathroom.

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Hemi nails it as usual. The car really was not overly expensive. It only had two direct competitors: The Buick Reatta, with less available power, and not as nice or nice looking as a TC at the same price, and the Allante, also with less available power and at $20K more. 

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