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I took the 57 Skyliner out today for a drive. She ran fine until I tried to accelerate more than just a little. If I gave her too much gas, she started choking. She hasn’t been run much over the winter, mostly just started in the garage with a couple short drives. 
 

Any ideas what to check, or maybe she just needs to be driven more to clear out the carb?

Edited by victorialynn2 (see edit history)
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I would first check all of the turning points on the accelerator pedal linkage to the carburetor and choke to be sure they are all lubricated and moving without hesitation.

Edited by keiser31 (see edit history)
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and choke is sprung open when warm. Floppy things can be a problem.

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Unlikely fuel if choke is staying open, electrical issues can act like anything.

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Is it stumbling upon acceleration? I have had a lot of problems over the years with the accelerator pump in the carburetor after sitting for the winter 

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5 minutes ago, John348 said:

Is it stumbling upon acceleration? I have had a lot of problems over the years with the accelerator pump in the carburetor after sitting for the winter 

Yes. It’s okay if I barely accelerate, but if I put any lead into it at all, it stumbles. 

11 minutes ago, John348 said:

Is it stumbling upon acceleration? I have had a lot of problems over the years with the accelerator pump in the carburetor after sitting for the winter 

Now that I think about this, I remember replacing the accelerator pump in Texas. Then Jack worked on it when I had some similar issues, but not sure what he did. Now it has the same symptoms again. Always in the spring after sitting. 

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The accelerator pump is either good or bad; it is very easy to test, and testing is more accurate than guessing.

 

To test the accelerator pump:

 

(1) start the engine

(2) stop the engine

(3) remove the air cleaner

(4) with one hand, physically open the choke butterfly

(5) while watching the pump discharge nozzle, with the other hand rotate the carburetor throttle to wide-open, and release, then repeat

(6) hopefully you saw a squirt of fuel (2 squirts if either a 2-barrel or 4-barrel), by at least the second rotation of the throttle

 

If the squirts are present, the accelerator pump does not need replacing.

 

As Keiser31 suggested, eyeballing all points of the accelerator linkage should be done.

 

Lots of possibilities with the ignition system, especially with Fords (yes, I own two Fords, so I am permitted to throw rocks ;) ); however:

 

Fuel differs in quality in different parts of the country. Here in central Missouri, fuel over 6 weeks old won't even run in my low compression tractor WITHOUT CHOKING THE CARBURETOR until the engine is hot! I doubt seriously if your Ford has a manual choke, so that would be virtually impossible. Once my tractor has run for maybe 30 minutes with from 1/2 to 1/4 choke, it is generally possible to completely open the choke, but the engine is still down on power. Run the old fuel out, fill with fresh fuel, and it purrs like a kitten with no choke after a couple of minutes. If the fuel is 3 months old, forget starting without using starting ether!

 

My suggestion (assuming the accelerator pump is good) would be to let the engine fully warm (20 minutes???) and then take it for a less than aggressive drive. If it runs normally, then try acceleration from at least 2500 RPM. If that works, just try normal driving, and burn out the old fuel.

 

Nice car!

 

EDIT: noticed the comment about lots of problems with accelerator pumps after sitting over the winter. This is just one of the reasons I prefer Carter carburetors with leather accelerator pumps rather than the diaphragms or neoprene pumps. The pumps in both of the genuine Carter AFB's on my F100 with 390 CID have been working fine for 23 years! Now if the fuel would just last 23 weeks, rather than years ;) And yes, both have manual chokes. 

 

Jon.

Edited by carbking (see edit history)
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Easy stuff to check:

 

1) Accelerator pump. With the car warm, choke open, engine off, look down carb throat and open throttle slowly. You should not be able to open the throttle at all without getting a little squirt from the accelerator pump. If you can move the throttle at all without gas coming out it will hesitate.

 

2) The Choke should be somewhere between halfway shut and shut with the engine cold and about room temp outside temperature (that's a rough guide, don't set it). If it was fine before, it's probably fine now. When the engine is warmed up it should be all the way open. It will feel floppy, nearly all cars of that era did, but it should be all the way open with the engine warmed up, straight up and down.

 

3) Check points gap or dwell. If there's too little gap (too much dwell), the points could be closing up when the vacuum advance moves them, taking away the spark.

 

4) Look at the wires inside the distributor. There is a ground wire from the breaker plate (where the points and condenser mount) to the distributor case. It is a special wire to take constant bending when the vacuum advance moves. It is bare on a Ford so it is easy to ascertain it's condition. If it is broke you could lose spark when the vacuum advance moves. There is also the wire to the points. It is also special bendable wire, but is harder to tell if it is broken because it is insulated. It should not stretch.

 

Edited by Bloo (see edit history)
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Thanks everyone. I want to clarify when I say it’s “choking”, what I really mean is “stumbling” or “hesitating”when I accelerate.
 

I’ll have to find a shop to check some of these things for me. I appreciate all the info! 

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I had a similar problem on my 56 Cadillac at one time.  It had me stumped as I went through everything I could think of on the carburetor, fuel pump, and fuel system.  It turned out to be a bad diaphragm on the distributor vacuum advance.  It reminds me of the adage: "90% of carburetor problems can be traced to the distributor."

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VL2. Be sure to check coil and points!  I did all the fuel checks and carb rebuild on my 38 and still had the problem. (See the thread about Stalling Studebaker) As Bloo pointed out the point gap or dwell is a definite possibility. Ed was kind enough to check mine after I replaced the coil, points, cap and wires. Both new coil and new points were bad. I hope to be back on the road tomorrow or Tuesday depending on when the distributor arrives back from Ed. 
Good luck, I hope it’s solved quickly. 

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Take a gander at the accelerator pump, but first, just running the car to full warm, and gently driving it around a bit will sometimes clear out jets. If it was running fine when parked, the distributor and points are fine. Possible condenser or coil issue.......yes, but very small. Cars should be diagnosed.......not guessed at. An experienced mechanic can quickly determine fuel or ignition. Best of luck, Ed. 

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I don't remember the last time that you had this problem.

I can take a look at the accelerator pump any time you want to stop by.

That last running issue you had was the condenser. The one I put in there was from NAPA.

I checked points gap at the same time but did not put a dwell meter on it.

I am pretty sure that what you describe will turn out to be the accelerator pump.

As Ed says, it might just fix itself with some use.

These old cars always have some issue or other and are not usually difficult to fix, Although I am not to sure if I am the right carburetor guy.

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I had an old Ford pickup once that was notorious for corrosion on the electrodes on the underside of the distributor cap.  Just a shot in the dark, but easy to check.

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10 hours ago, JACK M said:

I don't remember the last time that you had this problem.

I can take a look at the accelerator pump any time you want to stop by.

That last running issue you had was the condenser. The one I put in there was from NAPA.

I checked points gap at the same time but did not put a dwell meter on it.

I am pretty sure that what you describe will turn out to be the accelerator pump.

As Ed says, it might just fix itself with some use.

These old cars always have some issue or other and are not usually difficult to fix, Although I am not to sure if I am the right carburetor guy.

Thanks Jack. I’ll try running her and see if that helps. I know the accelerator pump was replaced in Texas. Justin did it. 

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2 hours ago, JACK M said:

How many years ago was that?

When I moved the car. 2017 or 2018 I believe. The install didn’t go well. He’s a farm boy with some car skills, so that might be why?

 

I’ll see how hard it is to get the part and come see you to check it out. Thank you!

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