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Car guy seeks 20-30's daily 4 door


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Afternoon all.  I am here seeking knowledge, experience, and advice.

 

There is an early Ford Model A Tudor for sale just down the road from me.  I was planning on purchasing it, but when I looked around online I was able to find a number of more desirable vehicles within my price range.

 

I prefer larger, 4 door cars and want something a little more capable of getting around in modern traffic.  I have no desire to rip out the running gear and replace it with modern equipment.  Better to just get a modern kit car at that point.

 

I don't mind adding things like a 2 speed brownie box or rear end swap, improved radiator, oil filter and such.  Things that stay true to the original character of the vehicle, yet allow it to perform better and last longer with regular usage.

 

But, even with improvements, it is still far better to start with something larger and more powerful than the venerable Model A in the first place, heh.  I am mechanically capable and do all my own work on my vehicles, partly because I enjoy it, and partly because finding skilled and knowledgeable techs for my vehicles is difficult, heh.

 

What I seek is a late 20's to 30's full fender style vehicle, contemporary to the Model A before the aero designs took over.  4 door, engine that with gearing or slight enhancement can allow it to cruise at 65mph for daily use and road trips.  My purchase price is a soft $10,000 in generally running condition, so Dusenberg and Bentley are not an option, heh.

 

I have currently found a 1927 Studebaker Commander and 1932 Nash 960, but know nothing of their driving personalities, parts support or really much if anything about them.  Other model recommendations are welcome, I am here to learn.  I plan to drive it regularly and live in the Midwest.

 

Much thanks and pardon the long post.

Edited by Nikodaemos (see edit history)
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Lots of things to consider. First is CID of the engine. If your going to use it as every day transportation, I recommend you get a large displacement engine..........325cid or better. 10k isn’t much of a budget for a running car, and a sorted car will be much more. I rather see you drive a modern junker for a while longer, and add to your budget. 20k is realistic if you are fussy and careful. If you can live with a bit more modern car, a 1940-1941 Cadillac is hard to beat. Parts are available and rather reasonable. It’s a good highway car stock, and it’s larger.....thus more comfortable to sit in. Not too many pre 1933 cars are comfortable to sit in or get in and out of. 

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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In 1928, the Jordan car company did a survey,

and most people did not ever drive more than

45 m.p.h.  The typical car of the era you describe

will probably not be suitable for driving daily in

modern circumstances, but it would be enjoyable

for driving in a small town or out in the countryside

away from traffic.

 

I recommend:  A modern everyday car of your 

choosing, PLUS an antique you like for occasional

driving at lower speeds.

 

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)
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John & Ed are right. A 20's or 30's car is not a good choice for a daily driver unless you're only going 5-10 miles & keep off the freeways & highways. If you moved up to late 40's or early 50's, I think you would find them more dependable, able to run at 55-60, and within your price range. See the FB post -

https://www.facebook.com/marketplace/item/1908101316031014/?ref=search&referral_code=marketplace_search&referral_story_type=post&tracking=browse_serp%3Adb7aa97c-af9f-4059-b6e8-1b8f3c48e4c5

May be an image of car and outdoors

https://www.facebook.com/marketplace/item/733830527302666?ref=search&referral_code=marketplace_search&referral_story_type=post&tracking=browse_serp%3Ac8da9110-beb1-47f6-8c5b-08559e21c0a6

May be an image of car

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Niko, are you aware that earlier cars required

more maintenance, and much more frequently?

This would be especially true when they're driven

daily.  Most modern mechanics don't have that

knowledge any more, but you could learn yourself.

 

And you may have to wait weeks or months to locate

the right parts, unless your car is common like a Model A.

If you live in an area with a lot of early cars, there

will be people to advise you or work on your cars.

 

It's good to have a realistic view of the enjoyment

you'll have.

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)
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40 minutes ago, Nikodaemos said:

What I seek is a late 20's to 30's full fender style vehicle, contemporary to the Model A before the aero designs took over.  4 door, engine that with gearing or slight enhancement can allow it to cruise at 70mph for daily use and road trips.  My purchase price is a soft $10,000

It sounds like you want to avoid the "fat fender" styling that came in around 1935?  If so, the car you seek with an original engine, even if overgeared,  that can "cruise" at sustainable 70mph, just does not exist in that budget.   

 

What I mean is a lengthy read:  If you "gear up" a final drive ratio to be able to "cruise" at 70mph, you will instantly notice that you will not have the reserve HP and TORQUE needed to prevent slowing down a lot on hills.  Then what will you do? Downshift to 2nd, and be in the breakdown lane with the motor screaming?

 

One more reason to not over-gear the final ratio, is that these early transmissions were deliberately geared "up" in first and reverse gears, to compensate for the 4:50-4:80 rear gear ratios in most early car rear ends.  The car will burn up the clutch trying to get going in 1st gear on the slightest hill. It will also be way too fast in 1st and reverse. That is just purely Physics 101, not guesswork.

 

Then, another thing is that these cars have the aerodynamics worse than a brick, so you need more motor HP/Torque to compensate.  So, a stock block motor just won't work if you want maintainable 70mph cruise speeds.

 

I'm older and no longer in a rush. I don't need, or find any pleasure in driving a early prewar at that constant speed.  (and I do have a modified one as a primary car that will easily cruise that high, or even higher if my son is driving it :o )  These cars also lack in handling, brakes, etc. 

 

I'd suggest that in that budget and wanting pre-1935 styling, and if you could settle for 55-60mph (with some modifications), a 33-34 Mopar is what I'd suggest.  They are factory hyd brakes, and the front of the front fenders allow less air under them at high speeds, compared to earlier fenders like a Model A which act like huge air scoops. Also, replacement parts are not impossible to find.   A  later Mopar flathead 6 will fit under the hood to get more HP and torque but still look stock. Then you could gear it up a tad bit.

 

 

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Buicks have always been good road cars. You need to drive several candidates. Hydramatic was first good automatic.

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1 hour ago, Nikodaemos said:

 

 

There is an early Ford Model A Tudor for sale just down the road from me.  I was planning on purchasing it, but when I looked around online I was able to find a number of more desirable vehicles within my price range.

 

I prefer larger, 4 door cars and want something a little more capable of getting around in modern traffic.  I have no desire to rip out the running gear and replace it with modern equipment.  Better to just get a modern kit car at that point.

 

 

What I seek is a late 20's to 30's full fender style vehicle, contemporary to the Model A before the aero designs took over.  4 door, engine that with gearing or slight enhancement can allow it to cruise at 70mph for daily use and road trips.  My purchase price is a soft $10,000 in generally running condition, so Dusenberg and Bentley are not an option, heh.

 

Nope. 100% impossible. You can’t cruise 70 with the style and lines you and I like for THAT kind of money. And you can’t modify one you and I can afford to do that safely either. Money’s gotta come WAY up, or hopes and expectations gotta come back to earth for a landing. Should we elaborate ? Or should we continue the Model A discussion ? 
 

Buy the way, Nicodaemos, a warm and hearty welcome to you ! You definitely have a very compatible old car soul with most of the rest of us here. Our AACA Champion of the daily driver car of the period you and I love so much, goes by the handle of “Tinindian” . He has put close to another 1/2 million miles on his old box of an ancient Pontiac which his grandfather put on the first 100,000 .   Stick with us, Nico.   We all need each other. 
              Oh, let me see if I can dig up a pic of me and my 1927 4 door Cadillac sedan. You will instantly fall in love with it. Never been restored or modified. You see original right down to the paint. But it is not a car in your price range, and I shudder to think of it at 70. It could do that for an extremely brief period, but it would take a crazier nut than I am to try driving it that fast even for a 1/2 minute.  -   Carl

 

 

 

 

 

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My father spent the better part of two decades trying to make an old car work as a daily driver. First was a Model A, but he quickly learned he was a sitting duck in rush hour traffic. Then a '34 Ford V8, which was better, but still not comfortable with 75 MPH traffic around him. Then a '41 Buick which actually worked as his daily driver for about 7 years in the 1980s. He ultimately gave up and just bought new cars because breakdowns were inevitable, creature comforts were missed (he was an attorney and could not afford to be late or sweaty when he arrived somewhere), and even in the more modest traffic conditions of the 1970s and 80s, he never felt comfortable with everyone rushing around him. A valiant effort but doomed to failure from the beginning.

 

An old car can be a daily driver. The question is, should it be? Unless your commute is like mine (3 miles @ 35 MPH) it's probably going to be harrowing and stressful rather than fun. Nothing older than the late 1930s will go 60 MPH for very long. Spend the $10K on something like a 20-year-old VW GTI or Fox-body Mustang that's economical, fun, and vintage without being so ancient that you're a rolling roadblock with a target on your back every time you leave the driveway.

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The decade from 1930 to 1940 saw perhaps the greatest improvement in cars, before or since.  The closer to 1940 that you're willing to get, the better.   

 

Just compare:  In 1930 you have 45-50 cruising speeds, somewhat primitive handling and (solid front axle) suspension, mostly mechanical brakes, bodies framed in wood, minimal creature comfort. 

 

By 1940 you have 55-60 cruising speeds (with more powerful engines, higher-speed axle ratios, early automatic transmissions, syncromesh shifting and overdrive) modern, independent front suspension, juice brakes, all-steel bodies that don't disintegrate if the car rolls over, and more comfortable and roomy interiors -- not to mention improved lighting, turn signals, radios and many other options not yet available for most 1930's cars.

 

Night and day.

 

I found my own personal sweet spot in a 1937 model which still falls short of being 1940-modern, but which can at least be driven in Washington Beltway traffic and on trips of several hundred miles.

 

Yes, you could choose a vintage-1930 car whose lines you like (preferably a higher-priced model that will feature the greatest mechanical improvements of the time) and you could do some subtle modifications (in lighting, braking, axle ratios, and perhaps springing), and you might have something you could put up with as a daily driver.  Then again, when you began to drive it you might realize your error.

 

My suggestion would be to poll owners of late-twenties / early thirties cars, to ask their experiences in actually driving their cars on a regular basis, and over long distances.  Go to some car shows, ask around your local AACA or other car club.  Maybe you'll discover that there IS a car from your desirable era, which can easily be adapted to modern driving.  Do your due diligence!  And, best of luck!

 

 

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About 35 years ago there was a man in our village who washed the store windows on Main Street. We called him the window washer and I don't think anyone knew his name. He carried an array of poles, extensions, squeegees that were quite noticeable traveling along the sidewalks. He also wore a top hat every day, I think to be noticed. He was. And remembered if one asks "Do you remember the window washer?" He was a little eccentric like me with my old cars. I usually drive my work truck. I like keeping the cars special. I wouldn't want them to be routine. If I had a top hat I would get that out just for special occasions as well. A little pomp and circumstance or a bit of "making a parade of one's self" is more fun when it is special.

Putting a vintage car to the plebeian duty of daily transportation just lacks luster. I would prefer a '55 Patrician just for Saturday morning coffee with the old car guys.

What's the motivation?

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Motivation ? I’ve owned “antique”cars from the ‘20s, ‘30s, ‘40s, ‘50s, ‘60s, ‘70s, ‘90s, and fairly high end modern 21st century stuff. If I were 1/2 my age to go through it again, the only car I would drive would be that ‘27 Cad. If not for my lack of model releases, I would show you pictures of various shes who draped herselves over that car as it has been parked in various times and places. And you know what ? Just operating a 100 year old car is its own reward, regardless of who, if anyone else , bears witness.     -    Carl 

Edited by C Carl (see edit history)
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Outside of maintenance time, my 22 cadillac would be capable of my daily commute to work (which I haven't had to do in over a year) which the fastest section is about 45mph... would it be enjoyable sitting in heavy traffic probably not 

 

For the cars of the 20's you'd really need to be looking at the 'premium' marques to get near the performance

Edited by hidden_hunter (see edit history)
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Nik, I hate to put a damper on your idea of a '20s to '30s car as a daily driver, but I wouldn't even consider it. Almost weekly maintenance, marginal brakes, suspension issues, mediocre windshield wipers etc. can make driving a car that old a bit of a chore. I drove my 1946 Ford Station Wagon from Long Island NY to California in 2010. We were on the road for 33 days in a 65 year old car and every day was an adventure, so I would try it with a late '40's/early '50s car.

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All good advice here so far.   A daily driver from the 20's & 30's is possible,

but not practical for all you want to do.   People that I know who do that all have other vehicles for highway travel.   They use them primarily locally 

and seek the roads less traveled for the longer trips where they and go

45 MPH and not need to plan on a mile a minute travel times.  

We have a local group that takes trips together and the usual speed is 45

to 50 MPH and we have cars 1913 to 1968.  nobody complains about the speeds, as saftey, enjoyment and preservation of these cars are the objective.  

I drive a 1934 Ford capable of 80 MPH, but not for more than a minute. Brakes, radiator, babbitt bearings, and my desire to see old age are all speed limiting factors.   Going around Atlanta in 8 lanes of traffic scares me in my modern car,  doing that in my 34 Ford would cause me to have a heart attack.   Stress on 87 year old car parts is equal to the stress on my original

equipment human parts.  (Less than 87 years)  Daily drivers are for local use only.  If you want to see America in you antique car, join us on AACA Tours, all of which are at 45 MPH or less.

  

Edited by Paul Dobbin
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+1 on all of that. Are a few marques in the 30's (more expensive ones) that can driven at modern speeds as long as you do not need to stop suddenly.

 

For example few drum brakes even into the 60s (maybe a really nice set of 8-lugs) that can handle even one stop from 70 (several nearby roads), remember a 61 Caddy convertible going to nothing in just one stop (rock hard pedal, no effect).

 

Suspect this is the main reason resto-mods are so popular today (take a classic body and drop on a modern chassis).

 

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I wouldn't write off the Model A idea. You will probably want to budget for an overdrive (they're not cheap). Parts are easy and they are easy cars to keep running. An A with overdrive will cruise at 50.  Brakes are not terrible (for the era) when set up properly. You could do worse.

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An affordable, very drivable and mechanically well engineered option would be any Mopar from '35 to 39. Plymouth/Dodge at the lower price range and Desoto/Chrysler models at the higher price range. Simple and easy mods can be made to make them a daily driver.

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Hmmm...65 mph on daily & long road trips, pre-1933 vintage:

 

  • 1917 Pierce-Arrow "48"
  • 1917 Peerless "56" Sporting Roadster (factory race car capable of averaging 80+ in a 112-mi race, race-prepped)
  • 1928 Mercedes "S" (supercharged, top speed 100mph +)
  • 1929 Graham-Paige "835" straight-8 (a sedan with factory body & 2 sidemounts took the 200-mi stock car record of 77.77 mph at Brooklands in 1929)
  • 1929 Peerless "125" (same engine as Graham-Paige above)
  • 1931 Stutz "DV-32" 

...None are cheap or plentiful. One's a $1/4M gem, one's down to 1 or 2 survivors[incl one that's done The Great Race 10 times - see if Hagerty's will sell it], one's a 7-figure car, one's around with a handful left, one's built in the same number as Duesenbergs - but down to 6 left, and one's too rare of a gem to flog on the highway unless it's on the drive to Pebble Beach.

...The last 3 have hydraulic brakes

...Here's a car that was f/s here on the forums 8 years ago for under $10K that would have met most of the criteria, a Graham-Paige 621 w/ a 288 Cu. In. six, 7 bearing crankshaft, 4-speed. If you found it and restored it 8 years ago, then it would have ceased to be a sub-$10K-car. Good starting point, though.

post-67743-143142230719_thumb.jpg............................................Here is the discussion of the car this photo came from:

 

Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)
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I agree wholehearted with those who urge caution regarding cars through 1934. The reason I use 1934 as a cutoff is the emergence of the Borg-Warner overdrive. It's use in 1935, by Studebaker, seems to be the first and became a mainstay of that marque, platform from that time forward. The OD use was led by the independent manufacturers and Chrysler in the early days. Some manufacturers like GM never did manage to figure it out. I'm not trying to try to toute any marque, but having an OD really does make for more pleasant highway driving experience. It will increase a car's top cruising speed significantly, with less engine noise. Caution however on some of the pre 1937 cars, because a driver could not lock out the OD. In mountainous country this can be dangerous.   

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So many posts about 'longest trip with your car', 'its all about driving them', 'a decent running car that is driven is better than a trailer queen', etc........ As soon as someone comes up with the idea of one for a daily driver there's nothing but negativity. 

 

I agree, I would not want to commute, nor would it be safe or smart, in beltway traffic.  However, If I had say for instance a job from which I worked out of my house this would be fun. A run to the hardware store, grocery store etc. I live in a fairly rural area and daily driving a Model A would  be a quite realistic endeavor. Yes, a 70+ yr old car would require a bit more than just turning the key every morning and a weekly visit to the gas pump, but thats part of the experience.

 

IF, I were to do so I think something along the lines of an 'A' would be near the top. Availability of parts and relatively easy to maintain would have to be a must.  I saw a blip of a fellow that documented his use of a Model A for daily use over the course of a year. It was very interesting. Def can be done.

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Lots of good advice, but the key remains the top speed requirement.  The proposal was to run at 65 mph everyday in a 10k$ pre-35 car - this is not going to work.  So consider if some aspect of the proposal can be compromised - that's up to you.

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Around me are a couple of old  late 1940s IH trucks that get semi regular use as a daily driver from the aspect of going to the hardware store or post office duty or other light delivery.  No 70 mph use or bumper to bumper traffic.  That kind of use is fine for them.  A model A is a god choice from a parts standpoint but the brakes and top speed limit where it can  safely used.  My 125cc Vespa is a good example of adapting the environment to the vehicle.  I tried using it on 45mph roads and I felt like I was just waiting for a disaster to happen.

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22 minutes ago, TAKerry said:

As soon as someone comes up with the idea of one for a daily driver there's nothing but negativity. 

Not negativity. The guy asked for advice & unless you've been living in a cave on a remote Pacific island, you should know he will get wheelbarrows full. I see pros and cons, as well as sound advice being offered, especially from some who own or owned cars he is looking at. It's up to him to sift through it, sort it out, weigh ALL the advice given here & make his decision.

It appears the biggest drawback to his daily driver plan is whether the car would be used on the freeway/highway on a daily basis. If yes, and he wants to commit suicide by freeway, then so be it. Otherwise, as Matt said, if it's a short ride to work daily on surface roads, he'd be fine.

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Actually 75 years ago (1946) is really the start of comfortable, safe long distance cruisers. If you want earlier styling, find  a Volvo Personvagnar ( PV) particularly with the B14A.

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My 60s and 70s Oldsmobiles are fully capable of handling modern traffic but I hate putting them in it. Not because they're incapable, but because of the damned idiots on the roads. You know, the ones who travel faster or slower than prevailing traffic, who dart in and out of lanes with impunity, who will cross four lanes of traffic when they realize they're at their exit, ad infinitum ad nauseam.

 

When in the Grand Marquis or the F150, I'll play with the best of them, bc the truck is big and the GM looks enough like a cop car in low light that they tend to straighten up and fly right.

 

Last night headed into town some hotshot in a new gm pickup was zipping along about 15 over, weaving in and out of traffic. He passed me on the right and cut back in. One flash of Mercury high beams and Superman (yeah, there was a big S in the back window) slowed down and behaved!😛

 

I have a lot of fun with that car.😏

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Consider a car from the late 1930's on. To expand on the post from Jon 37, these cars are a lot more "user friendly". By the late 1930's cars had:

higher horsepower

automatic choke

synchronized transmission shifting

signal lights

automatic spark advance

hydraulic brakes

independent front suspension.

overdrive

Consider a 1940 Packard 110 or 120. They had all of the above features and the least art deco styling of the era. 

Edited by Tom Boehm (see edit history)
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I drive my 38 Studebaker as a daily local driver. I’ve taken it on a few long trips of 4-500 miles each way. It will do 60 all day long and when needed can be pushed to 70 for very short periods of time. I routed the trips to avoid interstate highways to avoid that kind of traffic. It’s a great local driver with many of the options Tom mentioned above. It is not a big city commuter car if you expect any comfort or ease of driving. No air so in the summer 35+ is a requirement for airflow thru the A/C ( the cowl vent for those that don’t have one ). Get a car that fits your needs or adjust your requirements if possible. Just remember you did that got a reason a year after buying the tight car. 
Have fun 

dave s 

Edited by SC38DLS (see edit history)
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Niko has been back to the forum, but he

hasn't rejoined the conversation.  Niko, please

let us know your thoughts, so this conversation

can be more helpful to you.

 

For example, answer the questions repeated below.

Also, what type of location do you live in, and

expect to drive in?  A small town 10 miles from 

the next and connected by 2-lane highways;

a busy suburb with 4-lane traffic or worse;  a quiet

farmstead an hour from town?  We're trying to help,

with only partial information.

 

21 hours ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

Niko, are you aware that earlier cars required

more maintenance, and much more frequently?

 

20 hours ago, C Carl said:

Money’s gotta come WAY up, or hopes and expectations gotta come back to earth for a landing.

Should we elaborate?  Or should we continue the Model A discussion? 

 

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Hello again, Nico’ !

Very happy to see that you are reading our response to your important question. All the long timers here remember the road adventure I had , pictured above. Beginning February 2016 I drove 2,700 miles to and around  Las Vegas. Enjoyed my time so much that I overstayed my budgeted time in Vegas, and had to leave the old thing in tended storage there in late June. I have had too many problems to be able to drive back, and I don’t relish the thought of having my car come home in a box. Hopefully, at long last, I may be able to drive back in the perfect weather of Spring next year. Point being, during the 4 months of a road trip, and staying in various different locations, my 1927 Cadillac was my ONLY driver, daily, nightly, urban and rural environments alike. From sightseeing, to running simple errands with it, I loved the experience. If I could, I would live like that for at least 6 months of most of the years of the rest of my life. 
 

It CAN be done, just not at the target velocity you would prefer. And if your preferences run to the pre-aerodynamic design period , I am exactly in agreement with you. But technology in 1930 was not up to the task of STEADY 60-70  mph in anything except for the supercars which only the wealthiest of the time could afford. Those cars now are still toys for the fortunate few. And they still fall short of modern braking, handling, and requisite safe dynamic stability at speed. And that also includes aerodynamic stability which comes into play at speeds over, say, 40 mph or so. You must have the center of gravity sufficiently ahead of center of pressure. Few , if any , cars which you and I love so much fulfill that requirement. French automobile and aircraft designer Gabriel Voisin , lost a son due to aerodynamic instability causing a car crash. Voisin then became the first designer to incorporate fundamental aerodynamic stability considerations in automotive design. 
 

No one, not even the ghost of Gabriel Voisin, could reef me out of my boxy oldies and stuff me back into the drivers seat of the superbly capable 1939 Cadillac 60S I bought for $100 back 60+ years ago. Those Cadillacs are a safe and satisfying driving experience these days, and you can buy most of the the pleasure in a daily driver late ‘30s LaSalle. There is a ‘37 which seems to perfectly fill the bill down in “Not Mine” cars for sale. But, no , the driving experience is very different between a ‘37 Cad and a ‘27 Cad. Owned and driven these 10 years different engineering examples, and dearly love both. Etc. Etc.Etc.

 

I would love to be part of the “A” Model Ford discussion if we have it. And while you bring its cruising speed up just a little, make sure to start with a side mounted “A”. Has to do with dynamic stability. A “polar moment of inertia “ consideration. 
 

Gotta go out and see if my 1924 Cadillac will fire up right now. Hasn’t been driven or started since last November first.

 

Keep checking our advice here. Your choice is between lowering your speed needs, or lowering the age period of your intended acquisition. Bigger thrill for ME PERSONALLY, is to drive more slowly in lower tech machinery these days.     -   Cadillac Carl 

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As mentioned, overall weather conditions would be a major factor in whether its practical to use a car this old for daily transportation.  Where you are in the Midwest in terms of traffic density and flow would also be a major determinant.  

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Just a couple of years ago a guy was selling a pretty nice surviver condition ,good looking 1928 Peerless 4 door for" 5,ooo or best offer" Someone cleanly dumped in a big old 50's Caddy or Olds V8 back in the 60's ,the rest of the car was" right as rain "stock and still charming .

The original engine long gone..

The event was done,but it would be reversable..

That type of old ride would be a good consideration for a highway required daily beater of 1920s vintage.

I wouldn't consider this type of  car a hot or street rod or even a modified with the present form of "performance" usage of the word.

Not even a resto rod..

I don't now what? Just  had "an engine replacement" 

 

What did they call all those V12 flat head Lincoln Continentals that ended up with later O.H.V. V8s, a popular conversion at one time,and some still that way?

 

About 2 months ago maybe 3 or 4 ,on Ebay a little 29 Essex sedan sold for about 5 grand.

A simple repainted up  ,solid old car, not restored to any degree,it had some modern 4 banger in it with  all the Essex stock mechanicals-brakes too,which are pretty good on those cars.

 21" rubber on wood  spoke wheels .

Still used the stock pedal layout with the 5 speed.

 It's and old car,that looks like an old car,feels like and smells like an old car...but sounds and shifts like a 

Toyota!😝

 

Not for most of us,but I can see some amount of appeal .Maybe this type of car can be a serious consideration to get you going? You can collect the right motor and bits for the future along the way if you like too. 

I or we would like that.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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If you consider doing the Toyota solution above, kitcar does come to mind. And I hope what I have written will discourage anyone from overpowering an old vehicle to raise its cruising speed to an unacceptably unsafe level. Still won’t brake, still won’t handle, won’t have any form of passenger protection engineering, and won’t have the priceless time machine experience of operating ancient machinery. Let’s see if we can find you a real car you can love and enjoy for a long or shorter period of time. If you can come to terms with its design capabilities, you can answer the inevitable question with proud honesty : “ Hey  mister ! How fast will it go ?”  I always answer : “About twice as fast as any sane person would actually want to drive it !”    -    CC 

Edited by C Carl (see edit history)
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On 4/17/2021 at 4:10 PM, Matt Harwood said:

An old car can be a daily driver. The question is, should it be? Unless your commute is like mine (3 miles @ 35 MPH) it's probably going to be harrowing and stressful rather than fun. Nothing older than the late 1930s will go 60 MPH for very long. Spend the $10K on something like a 20-year-old VW GTI or Fox-body Mustang that's economical, fun, and vintage without being so ancient that you're a rolling roadblock with a target on your back every time you leave the driveway.

Your experience with this buyer's intentions would be a good indicator:  Can I drive it every day? - Page 2 - General Discussion - Antique Automobile Club of America - Discussion Forums (aaca.org)

 

(Even though, its a postwar car, its chassis and engineering are still clearly 1930's)

 

Craig

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As others with experience, including some with probably far more than I possess after only 40+ years of owning and driving dozens of vintage (although mostly post-war) cars, have already said, there are no easy answers, especially not knowing more about your actual intended driving requirements (i.e. distances, road conditions, weather, etc) and more so with given budget. 

I’d venture a guess that even if you’re able to find/get a complete and (mechanically) decent condition, running car (regardless of make/model) for free and can do most of the wrenching yourself, making “it” realistically reliable for daily driving might be a tall order within $10K budget restraints.

I’d be surprised if $30k or even $50K will buy any well enough sorted, stock pre-war car to be considered reliable for daily driving, especially year round, among modern traffic and distances more than few miles per day.

OTOH, I wouldn’t mind being proven wrong.

 

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