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1933 SINGER 6 cylinder Two Litre, Le Mans Replica.


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I  am now in the process of rebuilding an extremely rare 1933 SINGER, 6 cylinder, Two Litre. Unless there is one hiding somewhere in the USA or in Eastern Europe, it has to be the sole surviving example anywhere. There are none thought to have survived in the UK and this is the only one known to exist here in Australia.

Now it is to be come even rarer. As I acquired the car as a loosely assembled pile of parts I am about to start on its restoration and in the process build a replica of the 1933 "Fox & Nichols" Team Cars for that years LE MANS Race. This a totally different car to the more usual Singer (Factory) Le Mans Replicas.  I will have to ask you to be a little bit patient, I am now in my 85th year and I still like to do 90% of this work working by myself.

The illustrations below actually shows a "Fox & Nichols" Lagonda Team-car, and a F & N Singer Replica, there is an very real "family likeness"!

images-2.jpeg.c07e912b31737c01cc12c9f9173f45f7.jpegimages.jpeg.90af580d0ee64a21bc18a68a8975ec3f.jpeg

 

Bernie j.

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
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This may take a little time, I need to have the chassis repaired before I start work on the body frame. That and I need to look into the motor. I now have the cylinder head removed and it looks that it may be in reasonable condition. The only "paper work" I received with the "Car" when I bought it was a receipt for a "complete engine overhaul", in 1947!

In today's currency it would have cost about $75.oo*. in total.

 

* In 1947 the total was 37 pounds, 3shillings and 9 pence.

     Six pistons cost 2 pounds, 5 shillings. 

 

Australia did not change to Decimal Currency until 20 years later. (1966)

 

Bj.

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Now for a photograph of the actual "Work's car at the start of the actual LeMans Race. Initially my rebuild will have bolt on wheels. With this car the "windscreen" is actually a mesh bug screen with just a single aero screen in front of the driver. Otherwise it has nice clean lines with a minimum of "compound curves". All well within the limits of my capabilities.

My first task is to get my chassis "Sorted out".

Right now it is ready for me to lift the engine and gearbox out. I still have to remove all the brake rods and cables and drop the rear axle complete with the rear springs out and I can arrange for the necessary repairs to be done.

 

Bj.1934-03.jpg.b2ea99f8f2f219f930f848f663dc4935.jpg

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Posted (edited)

Thank you Dr Data,

I now have the chassis frame stripped bare with just the four shackle bolts to be removed from the rear springs to complete the job. I can then lift the chassis frame clear ready to be taken away for the repairs to the front to be done. Despite the apparent chaos there is some significant work being done. One little 84 year old does not require very much space, just the will to get on with the job. You can see at the bottom of the photograph where the front of the chassis had been "removed".  This had happened some years prior to my purchase of the "car".

 

BjDSCN7240.jpg.6738814fc8c2471bc9cf1078c0d54b69.jpg

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
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I have just finished lifting the motor and gearbox out of the chassis, the rear axle/springs have also now been removed. The next step is to have the chassis frame sand blasted and given a light coat of primer to prevent it from starting to rust at the first sign of any moisture in the air.  With that done it will be time to take it off to see about repairing the existing damage. There are two posible solutions but they can wait until it comes back from being sand blasted. Meanwhile I can be removing the sump from the engine in order to inspect the "big-end bearings" etc.

Loads of fun!

 

Bj

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Posted (edited)

Meanwhile I have decided that I have repaired chassis any number of times in the past and this one is no different!   Even if I have to borrow a  friends or my sons, Electric (Arc) Welding kit.

 It will save all the "whoohaa" of borrowing a trailer and towing it halfway across town & back again.  I will still have to find a pair of front springs. At least with the chassis set-up properly I will know what length main leaf I will need.

Let us/me just get on with the job!

 

Bj.

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
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Having successfully repaired the Left front Chassis, it is time to move onto the next problem. This one is the left hand rear corner where the next to last cross member, a major part giving this corner of the chassis all its strength. I have two choices, 1. to repair the  existing cross member the alternative 2. Replace this with a large-section piece of steel tube either square or round. My preference is for square if I can obtain a piece of the correct size. One more option is to use rectangular tube using two lengths side by side. Only time will tell. One thing in favour of the last option is that I already have some suitable tube in stock.  A short section of the top flange will also need to be cut out and replaced. Hours of "fun" to be anticipated.

Two thirds of this cross member are perfectly sound and so I am tempted th first look at the possibilities of cutting away rhe severely rusted sections and concentrate on repairing/replacing those. The more of the original and structurally sound sections that I can save the better.  Both you and I will just have to wait and see.

 

Bernie jDSCN7243.jpg.d5f17520de9e8f5b3e113fa5f7a10fee.jpg

 

 

 

 

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Bernie,

 

You continue to amaze.  I assume you must have found some reference for what the front frame of the Singer looked like, originally.  As to the left rear corner, there does not seem to be much in terms of repairable material left.  I once had a Healey 100-6 with front frame horns that looked like that.  You may as well go with your stock of pipe...who will notice it, anyway?

 

Cheers and continued success with the restoration.

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I was lucky one side of the front came with all the other bits so all I need to do I make a mirror image.

There may be enough material in the cross member I am replacing with square tube. That will be tucked away out of sight after a body is fitted. Next thing will be to build the body frame, something that I always enjoy doing.

Before I can start that I will need a Radiator surround as that gives me the height of the scuttle.

One thing logically follows the other. Hopefully there will be something that I can use in the Singer Clubs store.

 

Bj.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Ho No! It has happened again!

Yes! I have decided to pass the Singer on to someone who will love it and carefully restore it to it's former glory.

The good thing is that it will not cost anyone a wheelbarrow full of money.

Send me an email   twooldlags@gmail.com    and we can talk about how best we can make it yours.

 

twooldlags@gmail.com

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Deliciously easy fluffy scones with jam and cream 

Living Well | Tianna Nadalin | Images: Getty | Posted on 04 May 2021

Master the art of baking scones with this easy recipe from RACV Cape Schanck's head pastry chef. 

Is there anything better than the smell of freshly baked scones? The toasty aroma of buttery goodness wafting from the kitchen is surely the essence of homespun hospitality.   

Scones are a simple yet delicious way to add an indulgent touch to any celebration or gathering, especially when slathered with sweet sticky jam and lightly whipped cream. So universally irresistible are the delectable discs that they have become a staple at everything from high teas and baby showers to cake stalls and, of course, Mother’s Day celebrations. 

 

Scone with jam and cream


There’s an art to baking perfectly light and fluffy scones.


But don’t let their omnipresence fool you: there is an art to baking perfectly light and fluffy scones. And many perfectly capable cooks are defeated by the challenge. 

If your scones tend to turn out more like rock cakes than lovely leavened cream carriers, don’t despair. With a few pointers, you’ll be rolling out batches of superbly baked beauties in no time.  

Regardless of whether you like them sweet, savoury, sultana-loaded or slathered in jam and cream, RACV Cape Schanck head pastry chef Shannon Thirumal (previously of Lakehouse, Ezard and est by Merivale) has some simple tips for baking foolproof fluffy scones every time. Plus we share his ultimate go-to recipe for the easiest ever classic scones.  

 

 

Why are my scones dense and tough, not light and flaky? 

When it comes to light and fluffy scones, Shannon says the biggest mistake people make is overworking the dough. “When mixing the ingredients, you want it to just come together,” he says. “Overworking the dough develops the gluten which will make your scones heavy, hard and rubbery.

If you’re using a stand mixer with a paddle attachment, keep a close watch on it and stop beating as soon as the mix resembles breadcrumbs. If mixing by hand, gently rub butter into the flour using just the tips of your fingers and stop as soon as it resembles breadcrumbs.

 

How do you make scones rise better?

So you’ve added the rising agent but your scones are still flat as a tack? You might need to give it a rest, literally. “Respecting the resting time is important to relax the gluten,” Shannon says. “Every time the dough is worked the gluten is developed so it needs to rest to relax.”

Every recipe is different, and recommended resting times will vary, but make sure you follow the instructions and allow enough time to let the dough sit.

And don’t skip preheating the oven, says Shannon. “Having the oven preheated properly it gives the scones that extra push.”

 

Should you always work with cold hands when making scones? 

If your Nan always told you to work with cold hands when making scones – it turns out she was onto something. “Cold hands are important so that the butter does not melt,” Shannon says. “But working quickly and using a mixer also helps to reduce heat transfer from warm hands.”

 

What about flavour additions? 

Adding vanilla essence, sultanas or lemon zest might be delicious but, to quote Hugh Grant’s William Thatcher from Notting Hill, it’s not a classic. “Adding flavours is great but it takes away from what scones are meant to be,” Shannon says. 

But if you’re not a purist and feel like levelling up your Sunday scones, Shannon suggests adding lavender or earl grey tea. “It’ll give the scones a really nice aroma.”

While you can do this by steeping culinary lavender or earl grey tea in water (be sure to allow it to cool completely before adding 1/4 cup to the mix with the wet ingredients), Shannon says the easiest method is to simply grind them in a spice grinder and add the dry leaves into the bowl with your other dry ingredients.

 

Any other handy hacks for baking scones?

If your scones tend to be a little deflated, Shannon says swapping plain milk for buttermilk can yield fluffier results. “Buttermilk is more acidic, which helps to break down the gluten so the scones are softer.”

Another reason for flat scones may be that you’re placing them too far apart during baking. “Placing scones close to each other on the tray makes them work like a buddy system to rise,” says Shannon. If they’re too far apart, they have a tendency to expand outwards. Putting them closer together forces them to rise upwards.

And always remember practice makes perfect. “Don't be disappointed on your first attempt,” says Shannon.

 

And what about the toppings?

While some people prefer marmalade, Shannon says scone tradition dictates jam as the preferred option.  “I’m a fan of raspberry jam myself. And I make my own – just 50/50 raspberries and sugar and cooked down till thick.” As for the age-old question of which comes first: jam or cream, Shannon says there’s no debate – it has to be jam then cream on top, otherwise the jam will slide off. 

 

Close up of person cutting scone dough

 

Scones with jam and cream

 

Close up of homemade raspberry jam


Resting the dough before baking helps them rise to the occasion.


 

 

Makes: 20

 

Time: 1 hour 30 minutes

 

Difficulty: Easy

Ingredients

Dough

  • 500 g plain flour 
  • 25 g baking powder 
  • 2 g salt
  • 60 g sugar 
  • 150 g butter, softened 
  • 105 g whole eggs (about 2 eggs)
  • 225 g buttermilk

Egg wash

  • Egg yolk
  • Dash milk
  • Pinch salt

To serve

  • Jam
  • Whipped or clotted cream

Method

  1. Preheat fan-forced oven to 180°C 
  2. Combine the dry ingredients in a stand mixer and mix with a paddle attachment. If you don’t have a stand mixer, just add all the ingredients to a bowl and mix by hand.
  3. Add in the softened butter and mix with a paddle to form a crumbly texture. If mixing by hand, rub butter into the flour using your fingertips until the mixture resembles breadcrumbs.
  4. Beat together the eggs and milk and pour into the dry ingredients. More milk may be needed to make the dough slightly sticky. Be careful not to overwork. 
  5. Roll dough into a ball and leave it to rest on the bench for 30 minutes.
  6. Once rested, roll the dough out to about 3 centimetres thick.
  7. Cut to the desired size using a round cutter. If using a 55-millimetre cutter you will get about 20 rounds.
  8. Flip the scones upside down onto a tray lined with baking paper, placing them 2 centimetres apart. 
  9. Cover with a tea towel and allow to rest for a further 30 minutes.
  10. While the scones are resting, make an egg wash with egg yolk, milk and salt, and brush the rested scones.
  11. Place scones in the oven. 
  12. Reduce the temperature to 170°C and bake for 15 to 18 minutes, or until lightly golden on top.
  13. Allow to cool slightly. 
  14. Serve with raspberry jam, clotted cream (assembled in that order) and a glass of Trofeo Estate Terzetto prosecco-style sparkling, which is offered on the menu at Cape Schanck.
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9 hours ago, oldcar said:

Willy Nevalearn.

 

Now that the Singer is half way gone, [ I may never learn ]

About 4-5 years ago I went to look at an old Bug Eye from a craigslist add where I also found and passed on a $1,000.00 Le Mans Replica Singer that needed full restoration.  Being in the states and not spending hundreds of hours restoring an old right hand drive would have been a good reason for the decision, but it wasn't my reason. The word Replica chased me away because I didn't know enough about Singer to know it was important and didn't give it a second thought until you drug this thing home. 

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Bernie,

 

Glad to hear that the Singer is moving on to a new home...I hope the reconstruction continues.  

 

Lea Francis?  Sounds like you are working through every British mfg.!  And I thought you might be getting ready for an appearance on the Great British Baking Show, based upon your pivot to the scone recipe.  Which, BTW, I will probably try some morning this coming Fall or Winter.

 

Cheers!

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For the benefit of anyone who has not deciphered my Willy Nevalern this translates into WILL HE NEVER LEARN?

This is what is known as a rhetorical question. A question that one asks themselves, while already knowing the answer.

In this case the answer is "NO".

 

Bj.

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Posted (edited)

Re Lea Francis, my interest in these cars goes back some, (many) years,  when I offered to tow a friends Racing Austin Seven Special to a Historic race meeting, across the width of Australia, from Melbourne to Perth (look it up on the map of Australia). While in Perth I was offered a drive of an ex-works, Connaught. (you need to look that up too). It is only recently I have been offered a "Basket Case" 1950s Lea Francis as a possible restoration project. Of course it interests me. For a start just take a quick look at the size of the brake-drums in the photos below. That and the "under-slung" rear suspension & chassis. (Below). If ever a car was crying out to be rescued this is it!

Bj.

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DSCN7249.jpg.32fa199bc3758108e84198e70bafc860.jpg

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
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Further to my reference to my visit to Western Australia, the purpose of this trip was originally to help my friend Graeme Steinfort transport his racing Austin Seven to the Historic York Around the Houses meeting organised in part by the York Motor Museum. The original plan was that I would share the driving of the Austin BUT when it came my turn to have a drive there was just one problem, I could not fit into the car!  The enthusiastic Proprietor of the museum very kindly offered me the Museum's Connaught Sports Racing car to drive. How could I refuse. I instantly fell in love with the car!  

Sadly at the time it was not for sale but I have never forgotten it.

Now I am reminded that the Connaught "MPH 329" was basically a Lea Francis with a rather ugly two seater "Sports" racing body. 

NO I am not even thinking of attempting to replicate the Connaught body. . Provided I am succesful in buying the LeaF my first task will be to restore it back to a "Running Chassis".  Provided I do manage to buy it; I will have to start a new thread devoted to it. 

 

Bj.

 

2013525647_Connaught3.jpeg.a50b15e5faafda016d224d5158794b54.jpeg1769442116_Connaught5.jpeg.bb067a98425f59649e9b799be1f1da42.jpeg445359810_Connaught4.jpeg.dbce63df31ed4bf5e957708bc3f4826c.jpeg 

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Now I am waiting to hear from another LFOC member who has suggested that there is another LeaF I should look at before buying.  For now I think that a body similar to the one on MPH 329 may be outside my ability to construct at home. 

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I shoud stress at this point I am only considering buying one of the LeaFs available We are going to look at what is available tomorrow. There is a choice of two both with saloon bodies. Apart from anything else I have to satisfy myself that a Lea Francis Saloon (sedan) body is something that I really want. This is something that I will not know until I look at them. Both require some work on the engines. My question (to myself) is do I really need either one or a Lea Francis at all?

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Hello Frank

Thank you for your good wishes. Every so often we all have to take time to draw breath and to take stock of where we are. This is just one of those times.

 

Bernie j.

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