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Who has a parts car ? (or several) Just curious.


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Reading the thread about the 50 Chrysler got me thinking "that's a good $500 parts car".

 

Just a thought but for my nice Reatta, Allante, and SLK I also have a running ,driving (or did when parked) el cheapo "parts" car with title. Pocket change or less for each. How many others have one ?

 

Several real pluses: unobtanium parts with no shipping charge, extra set of tires and wheels, and original parts to compare. May not need now but in a decade ? Also a great base to teach another generation how to restore. All that is needed is space (and if small may be able to get three in the space for two. With storage do not need license or insurance.

 

How many others have a "parts car" ?

 

ps on advice I changed the title.

Edited by padgett (see edit history)
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I usually dump mine when the good one is driving.

I found that I rarely needed anything.

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My deal with my wife is I can have all the cars I want, as long as: (a) I can afford them, (b) I can store them inside, (c) they run and drive, and (d) they are titled and insured.  I negotiated one active project car as well (which is currently stretched to two  ...but just for a while   ...promise).   No room for parts cars in the 'contract', or in the garage, for that matter.  Too bad.

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Padgett...I'll let you know if I have a 2020 Jeep Cherokee parts car when my wife returns (hopefully) later today.  Reason being she and 4 of her girlfriends are out shopping at a few malls today...😁

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I have a number of ‘92 and ‘93 “antique “ FWD Cadillac parts cars. Those are superbly well designed cars, and only need extremely high tech, high performance front tires to become astonishing road cars. Sadly, I have just  converted my beautiful ‘93 60 Special into a low mileage parts car. Bit of a long somewhat strange and unpleasant story. Luckily I have 50 rather arid acres at my place, so my junkyard is large. Serves as a field mouse apartment complex.

 

As some of you know, I have just purchased another 1924 Cadillac from the granddaughter of the original owner. Bought sight unseen, not started for over 40 years. There could be significant reasons the car was laid up. Further problems from long dormancy ? I would HATE for this car to become a parts car. Therefore I would be very wise to add a 1924 or 1925 Cadillac parts car to my junkyard. Any leads, please ? Have cash, will travel.       -    C

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I find parts cars crucial.  Area of interest beyond my Brass Era addiction is somewhat oddball British cars of the 1950's , 60's , 70's.  I buy any that cross my path for a reasonable price.

  It's not 1990 anymore. It's either a parts car or full tilt retail, + shipping, + the border for mostly crappy repro parts that the big British Car parts places sell. Most of it isn't even worth the shipping let alone the part cost.

 

What I wouldn't give for 50 acres Carl ! Here in South Western British Columbia only multimillionaire's have that sort of a spread.

  I have a 26 rolling chassis with engine and trans. Pretty sure it is a Custom series , and it is definitely a short W.B. so it would have been from a 314 Roadster. Cheap , especially with exchange. Catch is it's here in British Columbia, about 5 miles North of the border. Due North of Linden / Birch Bay Washington. Wood wheel car { decent } + 1 extra wire wheel and front hub. Kelsey rims not so good.

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)
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Parts cars are the way to go when building a project. Keeping the left over chunks when you are done, can be a real eye sore. Have a 47 sedan parts car, it's days are numbered

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  • padgett changed the title to Who has a parts car ? (or several) Just curious.

'nother thing, with two you always have one to use as a template for repairing the other. I am finding this particularly true for the Allantes (both '89 IMNSHO the best year). Have always liked small oddballs.

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I bought a 1916 Oakland strictly for the Northway fan blade and water pump and had it shipped from North Dakota.  The majority of the rest of the usable parts were pedaled off and then I donated the bones to our local Old Car city which was a functioning junk yard until about 1980.  They now just exhibit  the junk.  I just about broke even but did a lot of free labor and it was fun.  What we will do to obtain unobtainable parts

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I try and mostly get bits and bobs of things that will be difficult to get when I actually need them , but don't have anywhere near enough room to store a whole other car - so things like a spare block etc

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I have only one parts car.

It is a '26 Rickenbacker that was pulled out of a field back in the 70's.

The parts car is pretty complete but the wood is pretty much gone.

In addition to the parts car I have a spare engine, trans and rear end for my Rickenbacker as well.

Oh, and about 6 spare OX2 carbs.

 

With something like a Rickenbacker you can never have too many parts.

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6 hours ago, zepher said:

I have only one parts car.

It is a '26 Rickenbacker that was pulled out of a field back in the 70's.

The parts car is pretty complete but the wood is pretty much gone.

In addition to the parts car I have a spare engine, trans and rear end for my Rickenbacker as well.

Oh, and about 6 spare OX2 carbs.

 

With something like a Rickenbacker you can never have too many parts.

All -

     Especially with the rarer, old makes like zepher and I have, it’s essential to locate and store a parts car (or several). One parts car with rotted wood and shot up body out of a field costs less, $500 for example, than machining a set of connecting rods that you can salvage out of it. Been there. I have several wrecked piles of Kissel parts cars and this has made my retirement tasks of restoring “good” Kissels much more enjoyable.

     The downside is where to store the parts cars. If you solve that, you are good to go.

    Ron hausmann p.e.

A11BB653-77D9-44BD-9BB5-005B6A63978C.jpeg

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Conexes are cheap around here. Friend has four.

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I acquired parts cars to support those of my cars that are my long-time keepers.  The cars, with years they have been owned are; '37 Cord Armchair Beverly, 70 years, '54 Jaguar XK 120 Roadster, 53 years, '31 Model A  Coupe,  38 years, '64 Comet Caliente F code 2 dr. Hardtop, 34 years.   The parts cars were disassembled, desirable parts carefully stored, and the remainder sold or otherwise disposed of.  This cache of parts has enabled my hobby to be enjoyed over the years without breaking the bank.  As an additional bonus, the keeper cars, having been bought eons ago, had been purchased for chump change.

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So I, like Frank DuVal, am mostly a Corvair guy (stop laughing!  I DRIVE them and their values are going up!) started almost 40 years ago with a collection of SIX Corvairs, one was $100, four were $75 each, and the last one was $50.  Anyway, I "restored" a '65 Monza coupe 110/4 and drove that my last year of high school, all thru college, and my first two years in the WDC area, when the car became a second car and I bought my first NEW car a 1991 Mustang 5.0 stick which I still have!  Three of the original six were dismantled and the shells were cut up for scrap due to severe NE PA rust issues (one a '62 Monza coupe 3 speed, and one a '63 Spyder coupe - both black with red interiors, and the last a '66 Monza moredoor for which I only needed the wheels, trunk bottom, and windshield), the '63 500 coupe was sent whole to Engler's junkyard in Stairville PA (it may still be there today!), and the '64 Monza moredoor gave up it's 110 engine for my '65, the seats were sold, and the rest went to a friend's farm which up until a few years ago was still there (although the paint was gone!  Surface rust was left behind).  Fast forward until around 2000 when I finally bought a SFH in Alexandria VA where I had more room to work on and part out some additional Corvairs.  The first a rough LM coupe with a Kelmark V8.  I bought it from the guy who built it.  He didn't want to cut up a "good" Corvair for the V8 conversion, so he hacked up a rust bucket POS Corvair, and ended up with a rust bucket POS Corvair with a V8 engine!  The second Corvair parts "car" was actually a Rampside.  Another rust buck-buck-buck BUC-KET(say it like you are clucking like a chicken!)  Dark blue with a white stripe, was probably beautiful when new.  Anyway, I found it in a small ad in the WashPost.  It had sat under a lean-to for decades.  I offered the seller $50 and that I would get it out of there.  I think the "get it out of there," was more important than the money.  I kind of felt bad when I counted out the 2 $20's & 1 $10.  The windshield was perfect as were the front and rear bumpers.  The bonus was that it had a factory gas heater, plus an NOS FC gas heater exhaust pipe behind the seat.  Too rusty to save, but it gave up a lot of good parts.  Another Corvair parts vehicle was another Forward Control, this time a YellowBrier.  My RedBrier still had its factory three rows of seats and I was looking for a factory camper kit to replace the rear seats.  I advertised in the Corvair Communique and low and behold a guy from the Baltimore area (about an hour away) called and said he had one, but I had to take the entire van!  No problem!  The camper kit is now in my good van and I sold the YellowBrier to a friend in northern Maryland.  I even delivered it.  More recently a '64 Monza coupe was purchased from a fellow Corvair enthusiast sans it's drivetrain, front seats, and dash panels.  He used the low mileage drivetrain in a dune buggy.  I was just interested in it for its factory tinted glass in all windows.  I still have it if anyone is interested, minus the glass.  The front fenders are outstanding!  A friend and I also bought a '66 Monza 'vert with a 140'/PG from a storage facility in a rough area of Baltimore.  He got the engine; I the transaxle.  Also, probably beautiful when new in Tahitian turquoise with a white interior.  The hulk is waiting in the weeds to be hauled away for scrap.  The most recent Corvair parts car was a '64 Spyder convertible!  Yes, the most desirable of all the EM Corvairs, but also a rust bucket.  Purchased in South Central PA from a guy who had a dozen or so Corvairs in a beautiful Quonset hut with a concrete floor.  The Corvairs were clearly outside for decades and were brought inside to possibly make them more desirable?  This was the BEST one, and still a POS.  The bonus was that someone had installed a Clark oil pan, which we did not notice until we were unloading it.  That's on the shelf for one of my own Corvairs, but this car was resold complete to a father son duo with plans of restoration.  Need any Corvair parts?  Please feel free to contact me!                   

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That's great. Had A Bunch of Covairs but favorites were 65 Corsa 4 carb with a 3.89 posi transaxle I autocrossed and a driver Fitch Sprint turbo both with 4 speeds. Most recent was a yellow 66 Monza 110/PG with a power convertible top I bought for my wife. Both are gone now.

 

Back in my Indiana days Warren Leveque and I shared his barn, remembering when I'd shut an race engine down he would always say "Oh thank you". Recently Sharon told me he had passed.

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 I bought a 76 Elcamino brand new. The only body part now, that came with the car new,

Is the cowl, the inner rear bed panels and the roof.

 I am now storing the second of two parts car for future use.

 

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A parts cars during a restoration? That's fine. Removing parts I may need down the road? That's fine too. Keeping a rusting eyesore(s) on my property after the restoration? Not a chance..........Bob

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37 minutes ago, Bhigdog said:

A parts cars during a restoration? That's fine. Removing parts I may need down the road? That's fine too. Keeping a rusting eyesore(s) on my property after the restoration? Not a chance..........Bob

 

Well, when you're dealing with cars like post war GM products you can get rid of a parts car and not have to worry about it.

But when it comes to a Rickenbacker or a Kissel, the moment you let something go is the moment you'll find you need something.

 

I'm curious as to how many people on this board have even seen a Rickenbacker in person or ridden in one? I've seen 4 Rickenbackers in person, not including the parts car. 

I know I've only seen a couple Kissels and they were in museums.

 

Edited by zepher (see edit history)
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and Jordan Playboys ? (most famous of the 20's).

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2 hours ago, zepher said:

 

Well, when you're dealing with cars like post war GM products you can get rid of a parts car and not have to worry about it.

But when it comes to a Rickenbacker or a Kissel, the moment you let something go is the moment you'll find you need something.

 

I'm curious as to how many people on this board have even seen a Rickenbacker in person or ridden in one? I've seen 4 Rickenbackers in person, not including the parts car. 

I know I've only seen a couple Kissels and they were in museums.

 

There are no absolutes and your point is taken and accepted. That said, a very desirable/rare/expensive parts car is likely kept inside and not likely left to become a "rusty eyesore".............Bob

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Both the second 89 Allante and SLK 230 (spare for the SLK320) are in the garage. 90 Reatta has been lost in a jungle for a few years.

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My buddy Joe in San Diego got a "parts car" 1929 Dodge and decided it was too complete to part out so he and his Dad drive it instead of taking it apart....

Picture 086.jpg

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I have owned a MB 107 intact parts car for 30 years.  Always kept in CC storage with my other cars as I was not organized enough to sell it.  A year ago my wife's pristine 81 380 SLC with 55K miles suffered catastrophic engine failure when a timing chain guide broke (interference engine).  With luck I will have the parts car roadworthy tomorrow after a 3 month rehab. Plan to drive it 5000 miles and then do a oil analysis.  If that comes put OK will do an engine swap with the wife's car.  When your wife has put up with this antique car/advertising obsession for 36 years you need to keep her happy!!!

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I had a '63 Olds 88 4 door parts car, and that was my first and last parts car. I paid $700 for it, but it took up too much space, so I took off the hood, trunk, windshield, air cleaner, grill and trim and put them in my basement (still there.) I took off a few other things that I put on my good '63 Olds...then gave the parts car away to someone I didn't even know. Life is too short to own parts cars, IMO. A late friend of mine owned about fifty VW Beetles and they were all parts cars (that he kept on some property he inherited.) After he died his inventory was nothing but a headache for his widow.

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Never bought a car as an investment, just for enjoying or racing. My cup runneth over.

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On 4/14/2021 at 7:20 PM, 1912Staver said:

I find parts cars crucial.  Area of interest beyond my Brass Era addiction is somewhat oddball British cars of the 1950's , 60's , 70's.  I buy any that cross my path for a reasonable price.

  It's not 1990 anymore. It's either a parts car or full tilt retail, + shipping, + the border for mostly crappy repro parts that the big British Car parts places sell. Most of it isn't even worth the shipping let alone the part cost.

 

What I wouldn't give for 50 acres Carl ! Here in South Western British Columbia only multimillionaire's have that sort of a spread.

  I have a 26 rolling chassis with engine and trans. Pretty sure it is a Custom series , and it is definitely a short W.B. so it would have been from a 314 Roadster. Cheap , especially with exchange. Catch is it's here in British Columbia, about 5 miles North of the border. Due North of Linden / Birch Bay Washington. Wood wheel car { decent } + 1 extra wire wheel and front hub. Kelsey rims not so good.

Being British your post sparked my interest regarding your collecting British car interest   , wondered what you  particularly collected or what you specially like,  as my interest is currently similar  mainly Austin  healeys, MG , triumph and jaguar 

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Had a gaggle of Jags before I took the cure. MGA and MG1100. Always thought an AH 3000 was a ladies car. Still have trouble not looking at the oil pressure guage

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12 minutes ago, Pilgrim65 said:

Being British your post sparked my interest regarding your collecting British car interest   , wondered what you  particularly collected or what you specially like,  as my interest is currently similar  mainly Austin  healeys, MG , triumph and jaguar 

 

 

Hi Pilgrim, MGA, early Sprites and Midgets , esp. Bug Eye's . TVR up to the Wedges. I have a 2500 M plus about 1/3 of a Grantura , some day I have to get serious about it and buy a new body shell , a previous owner did significant damage to the shell and threw it away, at least they are readily available if at a significant cost, Wife has a Morris Minor convertible , I have a Morris Minor based Buckler project, Series 2 Europa { Renault }, my old auto-X car but gradually evolving back to a street car. British cars are a bad habit !

 Like Jag's but well beyond my pocket these days.

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)
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Are you referring to my Buckler ? Definitely not a Berkeley.  Buckler's are a bit complicated but they were a essentially kit of parts intended for the would be home constructor of either a road going sports car , or a track car or an off road completion car { trials } . Trials events were , and still are , reasonably popular in the U.K. but the sport never really caught on in North America.

 Early on Buckler would sell you a kit to D.I.Y. or build up the car for you . Some of the early cars were a very well made unit however their numbers were small compared to the kit sales.

There were over a dozen different models produced over the years and several hundred produced in total. Mine is a later 1950's MK 16 , a some what rare ,longer wheelbase version of the more popular MK 15. Suspension on both was Morris Minor based, the MK 15 used the Minor power unit as well and the MK 16 was intended for either MG " T " series power or MGA. The buyer could specify motor mounts for either. The MK 15 fit nicely into the " Canada Class " racing regulations and at least 4 or 5 were sold here for that purpose. The best known one was the Autosport Special which won the series at least twice in the late 1950's.

It still survives.

Mine is a project but the most important part , the tubular chassis is very sound. Just time and money. Various aftermarket body's were fitted to Bucklers  over the years as well as many home made body's , particularly on the trials cars. The big deal is the very advanced for the time fabricated tube chassis.

Better than what Elva was building and not as fragile as an early Lotus. Mine is quite similar to an early Lotus 7 but a bit bigger. That's a real bonus as I am a very tight squeeze in a 7. They were also quite popular in New Zealand.

This is the Autosport after a recent restoration.See the source image

 

113 Buckler Cars Badge (1947-62) | Car badges, Badge, Things to sell

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)
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Zepher - I have ridden in, and photographed, a Rickenbacker.  I first joined AACA in 1965, when I lived in Minnesota.  I became editor of Northern Lights, the Minnesota Region newsletter, early in 1969, and (obviously!) stopped when I was transferred to Houston in 1970.  An older man - I regret that I've forgotten his name - had been restoring a Rickenbacker roadster when he suffered a massive stroke.  He was almost totally paralyzed on one side.  He was lucky to survive.  His wife insisted that he finish the Rickenbacker.  After dinner, she would drag him to the garage, put him on a creeper, shove him under the Rickenbacker, and slide him his tool box.  A couple of hours later she'd retrieve him and take him to bed.  Well, by dang, he finished the car.  In (or near) 1969, there was an AACA judging meet in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.  He and his wife drove the Rickenbacker some 90 miles to the meet, where the car won a National Second.  I wanted a picture for the cover of Northern Lights, so I asked him to take it to a suitable spot (a golf course, I think).  He did, and I rode shotgun.  He would turn that big beast, yanking on the steering wheel with his good arm, holding it with his crippled arm while he repositioned the good one for another yank.  And reversing the procedure to straighten out.  Somehow, he managed to shift it.  He scared the bejabbers out of me, but I got my cover picture.  What a guy!  And what a wife!

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