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Can you find me a picture of a current car that looks like this Olds?


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In the period picture thread I posted this color photo of an Olds taken in the 50s.  

 

Oldsmobile.jpg.a8a9ea4e710c8d3cddd544e2e244bfa5.jpg

 

My point was that if the car survived, it has been restored out of existence.

 

Can someone find me a picture of a 1947ish Olds convertible that is not red?  Doesn't have whitewalls,  curb feelers,  spot lights, etc?    Is there a current day Olds restored to look like this picture?

 

My joke was that the car most likely looks like this:

 

CircusWagon.jpg.781aaa2c89a0d119f01b6743dba7bed3.jpg

Edited by alsancle (see edit history)
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Here ya go⬇️
image.jpeg.6f84be5ac969450fc0ad1cd500651ad8.jpeg

 

But not red? Yes, 4 of the 1st 10 that come up in a Google Image Search.

(Yeah I see your point. But I’d also suggest the car in your 1950’s picture was in fact a bright red but the photo itself has fantastically faded and degraded - though red is always a difficult color to photograph. Especially in different light. I won’t bore anyone with the story of the Cutlass coupe my grandfather owned for less that 24 hours because it turned out to be a different shade of red than the maroon he thought it was under the dealer’s fluorescent lights one dark Michigan evening....)

Oh H, I’ll tell the story. He thought it was maroon. Next day he drove to work and at every stop light (there were about 18 of them) kids were pulling up and vroom vraooooom revving their engines challenging him to race.

It was ‘torch red’. He was 60something. He was not amused. This was around 1964. He took it right back to the dealer after work and drove home in a ‘98. Maroon.

Edited by Ben P. (see edit history)
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I hear your point but even a lot of the old adverts from the period have the convertibles with white walls. 
I agree though, why have a classic body and bling it out... doesn't make sense to me either but then again, the "hotrod" era was lost on me so I guess I'm a poor judge of beauty... Don't get me wrong, I love power but if it's not factory power mixed with class and longevity then it will be dated before you know it if you go changing things beyond what they should be. I think your point about these era's of Olds is a great example of taken something from it's natural form and making it un-natural. Great example.
 

 

Here's a 42- from the color at the door pillar it looks to be original dark green. Not a 47 but a year earlier essentially (due to the war). 

I do like the 47's more though for obvious reasons.
 

 

1942 Oldsmobile 60 for Sale | ClassicCars.com | CC-1062692

1942 Oldsmobile 60 (CC-1062692) for sale in lynchburg, Virginia

 

10910272-1942-oldsmobile-60-series-std.jpg

Edited by 30DodgePanel (see edit history)
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I expect that bronze brown was a factory color. As to why owners feel they must mess with cars from this era I have no insights. Many misguided people out there. There are some decent , original cars out there. But a bit of a hunt these days I am afraid. I am not a huge fan of early post war cars , but certain ones are pretty nice.

I can almost visualise my father as a young guy getting out of the one in the first photo. Except he had a 49 Monarch { Canadian Mercury } around 1955- 59.

Greg

 

Greg

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Pawnee Beige? Garnet Red?

I honestly don’t know, I don’t have eyes for this stuff. All I know is none of the ‘reds’ from the 1950’s 60’s 70’s and most of the 80’s in my family photo albums didn’t survive. None of it. At all.
 

13FCD52C-59BC-41EE-BC77-F7F36BCA6F8F.jpeg

Edited by Ben P. (see edit history)
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I'm sure someone will whine about the tires, but factory stock cars are still out there. I took this photo in 2012. 

 

I will say that the interesting colors are mostly gone. 

1941OldsmobileDynamicCruiser-vi.jpg

Those stupid crying baby dolls make me whine every time. Those things have no merit and shouldn't exist. If I ever buy an old car and one comes with it I'll be having a funeral pyre...

1941StudebakerCommander-vi.jpg

1950ChryslerRoyal-vi.jpg

 

I took all three photos at various years of Rhinebeck.

Edited by Billy Kingsley (see edit history)
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I can tolerate the whitewalls, it's the cringe-worthy, denim clad "time out dolls" that make my skin crawl.  

I enjoy every era of car at every show I visit, but when I see one of those..... things, I give the car and especially the owner a wide berth.

If you're not really sure and feel you need a way to gauge whether or not you're a loser, this is the perfect yard stick.

And please, spare me the nonsense of how this idiosyncratic weirdness helps to get the wives involved in the male dominated car hobby.  It's simply not true.  I bring my wife to many car shows.  She thinks they're weird too.

Do the right thing, crack an ice cold Bud, eat a cheeseburger, ogle the hot blonde two stalls over ....and put the doll in the dumpster.

 

loser1.jpg.289cf7fb7a0de8e4a678feb376f8dc53.jpg

 

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Interesting color on the Olds. I recall a 1942 Packard owned by one of the neighbors when I was a kid. It was a blackout model with most of the trim painted a similar root beer color. (Either that or someone didn't have enough masking tape when he decided on painting it!)

I also had an uncle with a 1957 Plymouth two-tone station wagon painted white and a similar metallic root beer brown. Funny how 60 or 70 year old memories are so clear when you can't remember what you ate for breakfast...

 

I don't know the body style designation for the car in question, but it was the same basic body as the '42 through '48 Buicks and Cadillacs. The following Olds convertible and coupe pictured were based on the smaller Chevrolet/Pontiac body of the same years. GM continued to use different bodies for the smaller "88's" and the larger "98's" into the 1950's.

 

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Btw,  I'm  not trying to disparage anyone.   I know if I was restoring a car in the 70s I probably would have fallen in the same trap.   30 years ago my White Shelby would have been red if it wasn't for build sheet staring at me saying otherwise.

 

I think the biggest sin with paint wasn't the color changes but the heavy use of metallic on cars that had flat paint.   You should see the battles I've had with my dad over the last 20 years over paint colors.   I love him, but you would think he owned the patent to metallic.

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