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My 1912 Metz is home!


Matt Goist
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Hello Everyone, 

 

My 1912 Twenty-two has finally made it to PA from Texas. Here are some pictures as promised. I was told by the widow selling this Metz that it had been in the same ownership for over 5 decades, and was obtained by trading for a shotgun. As far as I can tell it has been off the road for a very long time, but is surprisingly solid. The ancient Wards Riversides are even holding air (for now)  Its pretty complete mechanically. I'd love to find a proper gas tank, headlight mounts, top, belly pan, horn, and lights all around for it. I have a few projects ahead of this one, and I am not really sure what my goals for it are, but I'm kind of excited for it. The engine turns well, and feels like it has decent compression. Please feel free to reach out with any info or parts availability. 

 

-Matt

Metz 2.jpg

metz 1.jpg

Edited by Matt Goist (see edit history)
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Yes, it does look like a 1912 due to the single cross bolt holding the wheel hub to the bearing hub.  That feature was gone in 1913.    1911 Metz cars would have a different front hood and radiator, and are not 4 cyl.

 

In case you did not know; the single bolt allowed the wheels to be reversed so that the car could travel the deep wagon rutted dirt roads...and which the width of those wagon ruts differed in the South vs. North. 

 

Pull the cross bolt out, then slide the wheel off and turn it around backwards to change the "track" width of the car.  Over 30 years ago, I carried my '12 in the back of a pickup, and it would fit in there if I switched the wheels to the narrow track position.  Your '12 is set for narrow track in your pics.

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  • 1 month later...

That is a feature that Metz was famous for, and so many people reading about the cars get the idea (usually due to bad article writing?) that all Metz cars had. The fourteen spoke wheels are another thing that is special. Some model 22s had them, others had twelve spoke wheels. I don't know if the two wheel variations are connected or not.

I doubt I will live long enough to get to my Metz pile. Mine is in far worse condition, and missing quite a bit. However, I really think what I have could be restored for just a bit more effort than a good model T speedster. And I have done five of those over the years.

Nice survivor car! I feel a bit jealous.

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From what I have been able to discern, the fourteen spoke wheels and the reversible hubs are a 1912 feature. The 1913 and later Model 22s have twelve spokes and non-reversible hubs.

 

 

c813dae1-7cf4-4d2d-b409-8dbba333849c.jpg

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I don't know much about Metz other than they are quirky, and interesting (always been drawn to that) have an interesting history and this one in particular begs to be made driveable, reliable and simply enjoyed. I am smiling just looking at it.

 

Thanks you for sharing!

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Posted (edited)

I don't know if 1913-1914 wheels can be easily swapped onto a 1912 car. The conversion might involve also substituting the later front spindles and even the rear axle.

 

The easy, and pretty much foolproof, way to differentiate a 1912 Model 22 from the 1913 & 1914 cars (besides the 1912 only wheels) is the location of the shift lever; 1912 is the only year when it was mounted outside of the body. Metz moved the lever into the car with the introduction of the 1913 models. In fact, their ads for the new 1913 models make a point of listing the new, and easier to use "Center Control."   

 

 

 

 

 

Metz-22-1912.jpg

Metz-Special-1913-2.jpg

993e039c-55ca-4c50-994d-95df076773d6.jpg

Edited by Bharper
grammar (see edit history)
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Posted (edited)

Well only going by the title 

I'm in no way an expert

S/n on my engine is unreadable

So looking at 13 restored by the famous Bill Harrah  collection (there's is a  13 )who was well noted for authentic correct restoration my car matches there

Wheels and shift lever only different I found so far is the cylender  head  all lights and the oil filler on the motor

So mine might be a 12 by DMV clerk but it's been that way since there's where my paper trail starts

Edited by Buzz68 (see edit history)
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Thank you PFindlay, for finding and sharing this wonderful period photograph.

 

The car is a Metz Plan Car, possibly a 1911. They have a tow cylinder, horizontally opposed, air cooled engine. The car uses the Friction Drive which the Metz is known for with final drive to the rear wheels by two chains. These cars are a bit smaller than the later Model 22.

 

 

 

 

 

1911 Plan Car 001.jpg

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