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Black tar like substance in the fuel line


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Has anyone ever found a black, tar like substance in the fuel line? This car has been stored 30+ years in a hot summer climate. (Central Texas). 
 

Could an additive do this? Plan to replace gas tank, sender and fuel lines as well as the carb most likely as next steps.

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My Rambler's fuel system was full of that goo when I got it. It had been sitting for about 20 years. I think it just comes from the gas completely breaking down, and heat probably helps it along. It was a huge pain to clean out, I had the tank boiled out, got a new fuel pump and sending unit, and flushed out the lines using a small electric pump and some fresh gas. No fuel delivery issues and it's been a couple years. Sure is sticky and smells bad!

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Posted (edited)
5 minutes ago, AL1630 said:

My Rambler's fuel system was full of that goo when I got it. It had been sitting for about 20 years. I think it just comes from the gas completely breaking down, and heat probably helps it along. It was a huge pain to clean out, I had the tank boiled out, got a new fuel pump and sending unit, and flushed out the lines using a small electric pump and some fresh gas. No fuel delivery issues and it's been a couple years. Sure is sticky and smells bad!

Thank you! My friend said he couldn’t even blow air in the fuel line. 

Edited by victorialynn2 (see edit history)
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Whatever you do, don't put gas in the car with ANY of that left in the system and run the car.  I unwittingly did, I bought a Lincoln Continental, I thought the tank was dry, I put gas in and it started right up and ran great.  Shut it down, the next day it wouldn't start at all.

 

The varnish had dissolved in the gas, gotten on the valve stems, and locked every valve up solid.  Trying to start the car bent most of the pushrods, and it was a huge job to fix.  The valves had to be driven out of the guides with hammer and punch, heat didn't help much.

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Yep. Thats what happens when gas is left in a tank for years. And yes. Laquer thinner or Acetone will break it down. I've cleaned a lot of tanks out on all kinds of equipment and automotive stuff. Be warned, sometimes cleaning the stuff out leads to pin holes and leaks. Dandy Dave! 

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Been there, done that. It's always best to address the entire system. I would flush the lines with an electric fuel pump and a cleaner for a few hours to avoid replacing the lines.....easier and cheaper. Don't take any shortcuts.........carb, fuel pump, lines, and tank all need to be gone through. Best of luck. Ed

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I believe it is called Asphaltene & it is a common problem in diesel truck fuel tanks as well as well drilling rigs & storage containers. They make several different brands of treatment to get rid of it & keep it away. It is also commonly in stock at marine stores. Now obviously your case is way past the point of being fixed by an additive & a complete cleaning of the fuel system is the only cure

 

God Bless

Bill

https://www.jalopyjournal.com/forum/threads/nationwide-single-car-transport-hauling-open-or-enclosed.614419/

 

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16 hours ago, TAKerry said:

How hard is it to get a new fuel tank for that car? I would replace that and the lines as well. 

It’s a Corvair. We plan to get a new tank, fuel lines, sender and probably a carb. 

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6 hours ago, victorialynn2 said:

It’s a Corvair. We plan to get a new tank, fuel lines, sender and probably a carb. 

You may just as well go for a new fuel pump as well. The diaphragm in an old pump will usually fail in short order and could put gas in the engine oil. The carburetor may be fine if it is given a cleaning and a gasket kit.  

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Sounds like a good call to me.  I had a 190SL, fuel tanks werent cheap so I opted to clean. I cleaned and cleaned, but still wasnt 100% satisfied that I didnt leave just one little spec that would get lodged in a fuel line and cause trouble, although I never had problems it still worried me.

 

As long as the tank is available at a reasonable price, its a no brainer. That and fuel lines as well as new brake lines. 

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12 hours ago, victorialynn2 said:

probably a carb. 

Ah Ha! the Spyder! Otherwise you would have said carbs.😁

 

I recommend Steve Goodman in Colorado for rebuilding that YH. Rear Engine Specialists.

 

Yes, get a fuel pump also.  And the rubber T and hoses on the tank, since you are putting in a new tank. Lots of discussion on who sells the best T. Lots of the reproduced ones seem to last just a year. As this question on corvaircenter.com/phorum .

 

The filter is special also.... you will need to know if there is a return line connected to the filter. If no return line, then no T at the tank vent either. But, I thought all 63s had the return line. Just quickly look at the filter. Two or three connections?

Edited by Frank DuVal
Carburetor rebuilding (see edit history)
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9 hours ago, Frank DuVal said:

Ah Ha! the Spyder! Otherwise you would have said carbs.😁

 

I recommend Steve Goodman in Colorado for rebuilding that YH. Rear Engine Specialists.

 

Yes, get a fuel pump also.  And the rubber T and hoses on the tank, since you are putting in a new tank. Lots of discussion on who sells the best T. Lots of the reproduced ones seem to last just a year. As this question on corvaircenter.com/phorum .

 

The filter is special also.... you will need to know if there is a return line connected to the filter. If no return line, then no T at the tank vent either. But, I thought all 63s had the return line. Just quickly look at the filter. Two or three connections?

Thanks Frank, yes, the Spyder. I did already buy a fuel pump. I think I’m going to have to sideline this project for a bit. In the meantime I will work on getting correct parts. I appreciate all the info from you and the rest of the guys also. 

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On 4/13/2021 at 1:01 AM, victorialynn2 said:

It’s a Corvair. We plan to get a new tank, fuel lines, sender and probably a carb. 

 

I had replaced a fuel tank on a Corvair many years ago, the job looked much easier then it turned out to be. As I recall some of the steering linkage had to be removed. The reproduction fuel lines might be cheaper then cleaning out the line. Get a new sender as well

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1 hour ago, John348 said:

I had replaced a fuel tank on a Corvair many years ago, the job looked much easier then it turned out to be.

 

It is quite a chore! The fuel tank was installed on the assembly line (pictures are on the internet)  BEFORE anything else was installed in the front unibody under area. 😲

 

So unless you want to drop the front crossmember (and who wants to add all that work and broken bolts...?), you will be working in tight quarters. You MUST drop the sway bar (on those earlies so equipped, all 64s and lates have them).

 

Make new lines out of Cunifer, then never have to replace them again from rust.

 

A lift helps a lot, since you have to have the car so far up in the air if you are trying to remove tank with the filler and vent still connected (usual method since the clamps are impossible to get to typically).

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