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Questions About Early Chrysler Features


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I am contemplating another old car  purchase. My oldest car currently is a 1938 Plymouth. I am interested in going back further.

 

I think I like to be able to comfortably drive at 35-40 mph and feel stable.  Max 40 mph is good enough for around here, town cruising. Yet I don’t want it to feel like its strung-out zinging along, laboring at 40.  For reference my 1938 is quite comfortable at 50. 

 

What year would virtually all Mopar cars have centrifugal spark advance? 
 

About what era was vacuum advance pretty much a basic standard on all Mopar cars?

 

I have driven a 1928 DB Standard Six a few times. A 5P sedan model. It doesn’t feel all too stable to me at 40 mph. 25 mph its fine.  Maybe it needs some work? I’m unsure.  I recently found a 1928 Chrysler Coupe Model 62 for sale.  I suspect this car would have a considerably better horsepower to weigh ratio than the Standard Six. Less weight. It has an optional 60 hp 6 cyl red-head engine they claim. 54 HP was standard power, the ad reads.  Top speed was supposedly 62 mph. Full hydraulic brakes. I assume Lockheed.

 

Any idea if a 1928 Chrysler 62 has automatic spark timing advance and retard? Was an OD option available in 1928?  How about engine hardened valve seat inserts?  I suspect there are no synchros between anyntranny gears?

 

Thanks for any info related to this 1928 era. 
 

 

 

 

 

Edited by keithb7 (see edit history)
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Hi Keith,

 Pretty sure all 1928 Chryslers are manually advanced and retarded from the levers in the centre of the steering column. I have a Model 62 that I recently aquired from a warehouse where it has been stored for 45 years, the distributor has no centrifugal advance. No overdrive option, synchro's, or hardened valve seats were available in 1928.

 Cars built back in the 20's used whatever gas was available and have survived without leaded gas. The amount of mileage you are likely to do, I would not get hardened valve seats fitted

Viv

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I can’t say for other Chrysler makes, but Plymouth started having automatic spark advance with the 1931 PA models. I believe the 1931 & 32 used a vacuum advance only. 1933 and, I think, 1934 were centrifugal advance only. And 1935 with “perfected ignition” used both vacuum and centrifugal.

 

Not sure why you care if the car has both vacuum and centrifugal. I know the 1933 and 34 (and strongly suspect the 1931 & 32) don’t have a spark advance lever you have to worry about.

 

If you are looking for other modern features, the big change was the 1933 model year. It was a total redesign of the engine and running gear from the old Maxwell/Chrysler 4 design that evolved into the 1928-32 Plymouths. For 1933 and up you are looking at basically the same general mechanical design as your 1938 including thin shell insert bearings, hardened exhaust valve seats, down draft carburetor, etc.

 

1934 was the first year that Plymouth had an automatic choke (only on the PE (Deluxe) models). The 1934 PE was also the first to have a voltage regulator instead of a pure 3rd brush self-regulating generator.

 

First year for synchromesh on Plymouth was 1935, though the 1933 and 34 had sliding dog clutches so while they do better than sliding gears they do benefit from double clutching.

 

First year for overdrive for any Chrysler product was, I think, 1934.

 

 

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I have a 29 Chrysler 65 Sedan it does have a manual advance and retard lever on top of the steering wheel but only needs to be used if starting by crank handle(no Thanks). We have only just done a engine rebuild so I’m not pushing it yet but by the feeling of it 45-50mph should be comfortable when run in. As for handling I have been pleasantly surprised it handles and stops beautifully. There is no synchro but gear changes are easy and once in top you rarely need to change as the motor has a lot of power. The model 62 was the fore runner of the 65 I would imagine if it is well sorted and genuinely has a red head it should have similar stick to my 65 maybe even better with a lighter body style.

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Thanks for all the info folks. Good to know. I'm not sure what I want yet. I am pretty sure it'll be a Mopar product. At this point I am learning more about the mechanical updates and when they were introduced. 

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My 32 Dodge Brothers is right before Chrysler went to pretty much what your 38 has.  My car has free-wheeling, hydraulic brakes, a vacuum clutch (long since removed), a non synchro gearbox, centrifical advance, Floating Power rubber engine and transmission mounts, Babbitt bearings, and will cruise at 50 - 0nce I finish restoring it.  My friend Phil Kennedy has the same model and he drove from Connecticut to Detroit and back for the national meet celebrating the 100th anniversary of Dodge Brothers, so these old buggies can take it and then some.

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Keith: While most Chryslers had hydraulic brakes from the beginning in 1924, they were external contracting bands until the 1928 Imperial. 1929 models had the superior internal expanding type. Hydraulic or mechanical, internal expanding is better than external contracting. Zeke

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My Chrysler Series 65s will lock up all wheels in a straight line on dry asphalt showing the benefits of large hydraulic brakes on a light car, but I the reckon cars with external hydraulics can do that too? The 1928/29 change to internal hydraulic brakes is first-most significant if you end up driving in heavy rain where the cars with internal bands still works like any 50s car. Like pictured here..

All 6-cylinder Mopars will anyhow (when properly sorted) happily cruise at 50 mph plus, to master the non-synchronised transmission is an entertaining skill to learn in my view. Comparing the 1929 with my 1940 Chrysler the 11 years of development was huge in comfort and speed, however the 29 is fun in town and can be thrown around roundabouts like a 50s sportscar - whilst the 40 can NOT.

 

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Small hack regarding the the gearbox, if you use a very heavy gearbox oil, you can change gears (upshift slowly) without double clutching, though you will need to double clutch when down shifting from 3rd to 2nd. I used Penrite T250 Transoil in my former series 62.

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Yeah on the gear box front I don’t find my 29 too difficult just take your time but then again as I’m in the Farming game I have been driving some not so user friendly equipment since I was pretty young. 

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On 4/14/2021 at 4:00 AM, maok said:

if you use a very heavy gearbox oil, you can change gears (upshift slowly) without double clutching,

Until winter time and then you can't shift at all. I went from the 600w back to 140w and have no regrets. I have found that short shifting is the best option and these long stroke engines have no problem pulling the car at low RPM's. 

I'll admit that synchronizers would be nice. 

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