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1932 Country Club Coupe 90S Engine timing


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Hello All

 

I have a question in regards to engine timing and want to make sure I am not steering myself in the wrong direction.  Now last year I had the engine running and was having trouble putting the car in first and second gear and was attempting to tune down the carburetor and adjust the timing.  Now the car has not started since 1980 and I cleaned the carb and put new gaskets and needle valve in, took the water pump apart and cleaned, took of the fuel pump cleaned and put back.  The car was in pretty good shape, just parked.  So as I began to go thru the process of trying to get the timing down by going thru the blue manual specifications and adjustments for 1932 and followed the timing of the vehicle by watching no 3 exhaust fifth valve from front at top dead as exhaust is just about to open and timing to adv 10deg on the flywheel positioning rotor to number 1.  Now this is where I am thinking I screwed things up!  I in my ADHD hast was actually once I timed the first time was trying to time of the fourth valve instead of the 5th.  I did not realize what I was doing and thought the rotor had moved and moved it back by undoing the advance screw picking up the the distributor and moving to position, this was last winter.  I could not get the car to turn over and at that time winter was setting in and decided to continue in spring.

 

Spring is here and went out to see what I had done wrong, now I have redone the timing to the fifth valve and moved the distributor back to original and am going to attempt to start soon.  Now my questions are once I have in the position and no 1 is about to fire will the valves for no. 1 will both be in the up position?  Also the points should they be opening or closed or just about to open?  Other question is since moving the distributor a couple of times will that affect anything I should be concerned about with the distributor gear.  Any comments will be most appreciated, I am not a mechanic and have never claimed to be and am willing to learn as much as I can from those born with the gift.  I love antique cars and love driving them now I am attempting to understand what really makes them tick as much as possible.  Just wanted to throw that out there and if anyone wants to make a video that would be even more helpful.  I am going to go thru the book again and make sure I am in the right area.  Thank you again look forward to the comments.

 

Thank you

Matthew Maya

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I'm on my cell right now but if you go to the Buick forums then Me and my Buick then My 1931 Buick project- the saga begins and find next to the last post I just went through the process with good pictures and details 

 

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Spark plug fires as the points open, breaking the circuit to the coil. If you are timing #1 cylinder both valves should be closed and the piston at top dead center or close to it. Some cars are times a degree or two before TDC, but if it fires at TDC it will start.

 

I never heard of timing an engine by #5 valve. Are there any timing marks on the front pulley or flywheel? Is this a 1932 Buick you are talking about?

If you are static timing an engine from scratch there are several ways to determine exactly when the points open. One way is with a 6 volt test light, connected to the wire that goes to the points, when the points open the light will come on. Another way it to put a piece  of cigarette paper between the points and slowly turn the distributor, while gently tugging on the paper, when the points open it will come free. Either of these is good.

Adjust the timing by setting the engine at TDC and slowly turning the distributor until you get the timing right then tighten down the hold down bolt. Of course, you need to be sure the point gap is adjusted first because the point gap affects the timing.

Once you get it timed and running you can double check timing with a timing light.

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2 hours ago, Rusty_OToole said:

I never heard of timing an engine by #5 valve

The reference to #5 valve is to help locate #1 cylinder timing mark ON THE FLYWHEEL, it is just a way of knowing when the timing mark is coming up in the window on the bell housing.  You don't time to the #5 valve.  This is straight out of the 31/32 specs and adjustments manual which states "With ignition off crank the engine by hand until #3 cylinder exhaust valve starts to open."  "Then crank over slowly and watch timing hole...until the 10 degree mark on 8-80, 8-90 series flywheel coincides with the index line." index line is on the bell housing.

 

I just did a pictures and description of the whole job of setting points clearance, putting the engine on the timing mark for #1 on the flywheel, which way the distributor body should be oriented, where the rotor needs to point for #1 cylinder when the distributor gear is meshed with the camshaft, how to connect and set the spark retard cable to its lever for the instrument panel control and what position it must be in for successful setup,  how to get the primary point timing set and locked in, how to rotate the engine to the Syn 6 timing mark to set the secondary points and how to adjust secondary point timing and lock in.  It's the 4th post from the end of my thread on 1931 Buick restoration found here. 

 

https://forums.aaca.org/topic/309205-my-1931-buick-project-the-saga-begins/page/3/?tab=comments#comment-2201914

 

Edited by Str8-8-Dave (see edit history)
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Hello Dave

 

Thank you very much, I really appreciate it.  I will be going over it again and again to make sure I have it correct.  I will keep you posted.

 

Thank you again

Matt

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34 minutes ago, M&M said:

I will be going over it again and again

There are quite a few steps but taken one at a time none are difficult.  Best of luck with this and if you have questions I will try to help you.

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  • 3 weeks later...

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