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Not every antique automobile enthusiast is a club joiner.  

I belong to several clubs and I enjoy club membership and events.  

That being said, there has been a lot of discussion lately of club membership numbers.  

For most clubs, the numbers are going down.  And that is causing anxiety in some quarters.  

It begs the question --at least in my mind-- is a club more enjoyable if it has 9,000 members instead of 4,000?  

Or--Is the club less viable if it has three-quarters of the numbers it had 25 years ago?

I think the answer is "no" to both.   It is my contention that a club is not any less viable or enjoyable with reduced membership.  

At least one club I belong to has been kicking around stupid ideas to employ in an effort to increase membership.  Bad idea.  

 

 

I am looking for total club numbers for 2021 for several clubs.  I can't find the numbers in my own directories.  

 

Looking for these numbers:  

 

Total Club Membership:

Early Ford V-8 Club

Cadillac LaSalle Club

Buick Club

AACA

Model A Restorers Club

 

I think the Buick Club of America numbers are in the issue where the Club's vitals are published.  

I am going to try and run these numbers down on my own here at home, but if anyone can save me time please post the numbers.  Would also like to find the numbers for past years for comparison.   Thanks.  

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If I joined all of the clubs that perk my interest I couldn't afford it.

I did within the last year or so join two clubs.

For my own selfish reasons (information and web comradery) as neither one is active  where I live.

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I just grabbed my Model A News and cannot for the life of me find a member count or magazine distrbution count.  Will look again tonight.  I think MAFCA and MARC both have a pretty good membership base, I would guess a very significant number belong to both clubs which are essentially the same.

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I have been concerned with membership of our local region AACA for some time.  We have been around for a while but were never a large club.  When I got in about 12 years ago we had 25-35 people at out monthly membership meetings and always tried to have a program.  Now we would be lucky to have 10 out and it is always the same die hards.  I am 63 and the youngest or second youngest in the group.  I have started a cars and coffee on Sunday mornings which Covid has made rather successful due to cancellation of other events which are sponsored.  We are totally un-sponsored and it is totally casual or unorganized.  I and other members of the club have not been able to recruit one member for the Harford Region AACA.  Out of normally say 75-100 cars that show up randomly I would say 80% are hot rods and modifieds.  We have a great time and have no trouble with burnouts and such but no one is interested in the club.  I think there are lot of reasons for the declining club membership all of which are legitimate reasons though sad.  The aging population has slowed everyone down and we simply don't have the energy we once did.  Everything organized is more difficult today,  worrying about liability and all the rules to be broken and no one including  me wants the risk.  It used to be if there was a car show the local clubs put it on for the public to enjoy once or twice a year.  Now (pre COVID) you can go to 5 cruise nights a week  and it is no big deal.  Most young people don't have the connection to the cars our generation had and don't have the excess cash to participate in a hobby which is expensive.  Lastly the interest in the type cars has changed and the modified and hot rod builders are driving the hobby today more than ever.  I continue to support the all original portion but am in the minority.  In spite of the AACA putting a lot of effort into the younger generation I'm not sure there will be enough people to support the Marque clubs or the AACA.

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To me total membership is somewhat less important than actual engaged participation. In almost every car club I'm actively involved with 20% of the members do 80% of the work anyway. I doubt very much my experience is vastly different from anyone else in that regard. There is a lot to be said for quality over quantity. That said, I'm always happy to see new faces getting involved!

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27 minutes ago, JCHansen1 said:

To me total membership is somewhat less important than actual engaged participation. In almost every car club I'm actively involved with 20% of the members do 80% of the work anyway. I doubt very much my experience is vastly different from anyone else in that regard. There is a lot to be said for quality over quantity. That said, I'm always happy to see new faces getting involved!

 

Yes, I was involved with two non profits and it was the same.  80 members but the same 20 people showing up all the time.  I think some of the clubs will survive undiluted.  The locals may fade, but the national will probably survive.  

 

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1 hour ago, Pomeroy41144 said:

Total Club Membership:

Early Ford V-8 Club

Cadillac LaSalle Club

Buick Club

AACA

Model A Restorers Club

 

 

Some of these numbers are based upon what I've heard of found on their websites or social media pages, others based on direct knowledge. (I think they are pretty accurate)

  • Early Ford V8 - 9,000
  • Model A Restorers - 15,000
  • Cadillac & LaSalle - 6,500
  • Buick Club - 6,500
  • Antique Automobile Club of America - 30,000
  • Vintage Chevrolet Club - 6,800
  • Pierce-Arrow Society - 850
  • Classic Car Club of America - 6,000
  • Pontiac Club (POCI) - 6,000
  • Oldsmobile Club - 6,000
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3 minutes ago, Peter Gariepy said:

 

 

Some of these numbers are based upon what I've heard of found on their websites or social media pages, others based on direct knowledge. (I think they are pretty accurate)

  • Early Ford V8 - 9,000
  • Model A Restorers - 15,000
  • Cadillac & LaSalle - 6,500
  • Buick Club - 6,500
  • Antique Automobile Club of America - 30,000
  • Vintage Chevrolet Club - 6,800
  • Pierce-Arrow Society - 850
  • Classic Car Club of America - 6,000
  • Pontiac Club (POCI) - 6,000
  • Oldsmobile Club - 6,000

 

 

 

Thank you so much.  I hope our clubs can survive.  I love National Meets.  Like old car heaven.  

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2 hours ago, Pomeroy41144 said:

It begs the question --at least in my mind-- is a club more enjoyable if it has 9,000 members instead of 4,000?  

 

This is probably from limited observation... but I see local and national clubs collaborated.

For example:

  • Local clubs are working together.  GM Clubs including:  BCA/POC/OCA/CHEV/CAD doing group outings.  Cool to see.
  • National AACA, BCA, and Hudson clubs are all working together for the AACA meet in Auburn coming up soon.

 

 

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I agree that membership numbers aren't as important as engagement, although I think membership numbers can matter if the club relies on membership dues to pay for publications.  Fewer members can mean fewer or lower quality publications.  But that may or may not be important, depending on the club.

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Unfortunately, I think many clubs will consolidate in the future. Nature of the beast. Demographics, on line chat rooms, Facebook clubs, Ext..............  no one is going to throw running and driving cars away.......but prices and events will surly be different in the future. Personally, I have been doing much more of the “email and Facebook” club events since the pandemic hit. Time will tell.......

 

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For small clubs like ours I would guess that merger with other regions will happen and is a reasonable way to go.  I think for a club to thrive it has to be about the cars and doing events with the cars.  The social element is easier but has less draw to new people.  There are so many things pulling us different directions and we need people to want to join for the technical support and the interaction with like minded people.   What is the old adage "I wouldn't belong to a club that would have me as a member", this is how I feel about the pure social element of th clubs.

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3 hours ago, Pomeroy41144 said:

It is my contention that a club is not any less viable or enjoyable with reduced membership.  

At least one club I belong to has been kicking around stupid ideas to employ in an effort to increase membership.    

 

Excellent points, Pomeroy.  Even if membership is

down a bit, keep up the standards and the enjoyment.

Organizations of all sorts, when facing declines,

sometimes want to lower their standards to get

more people.  "Let's accept street rods at our

shows and tours," an antique car club might say.

"Let's relax membership requirements," another

organization might think.

 

But the high standards are what attracts people in

the first place.

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I belong to a couple of organizations but would not consider them car clubs, although I suppose that is exactly what they are. I belong to POCI (Pontiac) and AACA.  I dont and have never participated (yet) in a sponsored event.  I have been tempted to contact the people local to my area but being busy and lazy I havent yet.  To me a 'club' is getting together with some guys, whether 2 or 50, hanging out, talking about a like subject. Maybe a monthly cars n coffee, a show a year, something to that effect. So I am as guilty as the next guy for not participating but would love to do so, just not sure which direction to head to first.

 

As far as membership, car club or civic club its the same all over. I was very active in our local Kiwanis for many years, we had a paid membership of over 200,  30 guys showed up at the meetings every week and 10 would do all of the work.

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I belong to only two National Clubs,  AACA & EFV8CA and two local groups.   I value the membership in all of them for roughly the same reasons.  #1   I know other people in all that share my love of antique cars, and those friendships are mutual and recipricol.   #2   Those people are more interested in driving an enjoying their antique cars than showing them for trophies.   A evening drive for ice cream or to see sunsets is more fun than a cruise-in and a visit

to historical sites in our cars on roads less travelled is educational and fun with people we like.   As one of the 20%, sharing the experience is fun as well.

Edited by Paul Dobbin
spilling (see edit history)
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From my own perspective and experience- not everyone who belongs to a national club can afford the time or the cost for : tours in assorted parts of the country, national meets where a major focus is on what best cars will win the awards, yearly annual meetings . I see it as all coming down to cost - to arrive at the meet/event ( getting a car and you there to participate) , costs for food, lodging , activities.  They need to be family affairs for the most part, if you include kids , that is the next generation who will own the cars. If the kids ( just about all are well behaved , they are used to their parents and grand parents who own the same cars so know how to treat and respect them) have fun, are/can be  treated well by other participants on the tour or at the event, get their "silly" questions answered, they will remember and respect that their entire life. I taught kids ages 5 to 18 for over 40 years , I had the whole school as I was the art teacher (1,100 kids a week) . Kids are a lot more observant and know more then you realize. Don't talk down to them, you will be able to tell the level that they can understand, let them sit in your vehicle and ask questions. They won't damage or dirty up you car, no longer wear diapers  but may have to when they get past 85.......

Publications are sooooo important, and that is not just coming from someone who is an author who writes stories ( me) . For many it is the only thing that they get for their annual dues. Members need to constantly be reminded that the publications want their stories- editors can edit, so as long as they have something to work with you will get a good publication.

Many club officers, boards of Directors feel that their club is in competition with another one. Perhaps it would be wise if you have a national meet to invite the local car club region from another club to one of your events ( perhaps a talk being given by someone) for the cost of some coffee, tea and donuts you may see more appreciation for your favorite club, make of car, or purpose that the invited people never knew about. Welcome them with open arms. I have been on the national and regional boards for a number of clubs over the past 50+ years, egos and attitudes of importance have lessened the positive impression and impact of many of those clubs. After experiencing that , now I just walk away and look elsewhere , life is to short to not have a good time when you can. I never belonged to any club and expected to be entertained because I paid my dues - I always contributed what I could in some way.  We are all here for the same reason- we love used cars.

One of the best PR jobs during these trying times for "old car people" to bring us all together - when we weren't allowed contact in person are these AACA Forums. It keeps us sane ( or allows us to justify how crazy we are because we can point to here and say - see look at all of them doing it to, every day, just like me).

Walt

Edited by Walt G
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59 minutes ago, Walt G said:

We are all here for the same reason- we love used cars.

One of the best PR jobs during these trying times for "old car people" to bring us all together - when we weren't allowed contact in person are these AACA Forums. It keeps us sane ( or allows us to justify how crazy we are because we can point to here and say - see look at all of them doing it to, every day, just like me).

Walt


This forum was never meant to replace local and national activities, but instead provide an alternate way to communicate with fellow hobbyists. COVID has escalated forum participation for no other than reason other activities have been limited. With our continued use of masks and social distancing, and more widespread distribution of the vaccine, local and national activities will be in full swing soon!

 

I got my second COVID shot today.  It gives me hope that activities will return soon that let us share our old cars in person and to interact with fellow hobbyists face-to-face.

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Peter, the Forums gave us the sense of community and friendship that we could not have in person, until the good times we were used to can return. I too got my second Covid shot today as well!  Your last sentence says it all.

Walt

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I've said this before and I'm sure I'll say it again, but if you want younger people to get involved, stop insulting cars post WWII. 

 

The majority of any hobby is rekindling fond memories of youth, reminiscing.  For people in my generation that's 70s through 90s cars. 

 

When we get comments about it being "simply a used car" or "should be in the parking lot" it tells us in no uncertain terms: you are not wanted here. So, of course we aren't going to join your club or attend your events. 

 

I have had that happen on the AACA facebook group. Put me off the club for literally years. I only gave a second chance to the club because, despite attending 25-30 car shows and cruises a year, I still wanted more car stuff in my life. This forum seemed active and wasn't about chopping every identifying feature off of a car. So I'm decided to give it a try...and I'm still here. 

Edited by Billy Kingsley (see edit history)
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Numbers=activity=volunteers=newsletters, get togethers=more members=infinitum. If the chain is broken at any point, the club will shrivel and die, as has happened to the AACA in the Pacific NW.

 

11 hours ago, edinmass said:

Unfortunately, I think many clubs will consolidate in the future. Nature of the beast. Demographics, on line chat rooms, Facebook clubs, Ext..............  no one is going to throw running and driving cars away.......but prices and events will surly be different in the future. Personally, I have been doing much more of the “email and Facebook” club events since the pandemic hit. Time will tell.......

 

 For thirty year I've felt that consolidation was the best solution for survival of the old car culture. We are all outliers in the world today. The negative pressures from outside the culture are often matched by pettiness and infighting, between factions within our culture. I'm too old to make a difference. I won't be around to help plot the future. It's up to you younger people to decide whether you want the chain to be broken. Like the demise of the AACA in the PNW, once dead it may be impossible to resurrect.

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Agree with Bill's comments on consolidation.  For better or worse, online forums and fb groups (literally hundreds of collector car groups to choose from, only reason I use fb, really.) Have impacted traditional clubs IMO.  You join most for free, and have instant access to people, parts, knowledge and pop up type events as Ed pointed out.  Appealing, especially to folks who have grown up online as well.   But, they are different and lacking in some ways.  Organizing national level type events, a hard publication, and maybe a little deeper member committment is missing.  As well as the ability to organize for legislative purposes.  That will be key in the future and perhaps the most compelling reason for those seripus about preserving the hobby to get behind a consolidated group.  AACA is the natural choice here, we will see how that plays out.

 

Anyone who thinks declining traditional club membership is a death knell is wrong.  A concern, yes, but for example, one car of ours is the 89 MB 560 SL, otherwise known as an R107 series car.  There is not one, but at least 6 or 7 fb groups devoted to this single series within a single marque.  And so on.  Those groups are exploding so interest is there, it is just changing venues.

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Quote

 

Billy hits on an important issue for the "rolling admission" clubs, but not a new one.  WWII has been a rather arbitrary break point in the hobby for a long time.  But how much different is a 46 from a 42, choose your make?  I think the other major break point is around 1970-72 when early smog controls went in, and 1970 and 1975 cars do drive very differently, to put it kindly.

 

 The "closed end" clubs don't have this issue (CCCA, MARC, any orphan marque) but have the demographic issue of not covering cars younger people remember from daily life.

 

Joint meets make sense to me.  Packard and Studebaker combined for a National meet a few years ago in South Bend.  There were no crises that I saw, although where to put the 57-58 Packardbakers was perhaps a question. :)

 

I think the real border question concerns modified cars/rods.  This is where the philosophical differences really lie more than marque and year. 

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13 hours ago, Peter Gariepy said:

 It gives me hope that activities will return soon that let us share our old cars in person and to interact with fellow hobbyists face-to-face.

Life resumes for me in two weeks with the return of the Pate Swap Meet with 8500 spaces sold.  Thirty per cent of Texans have been vaccinated and we have been vaccinating 18 and older for a week.  Hopefully we are getting close to Herd immunity.  Can't wait for Hershey!!!

On the topic of car clubs the greater Houston area has over 4 million people and can't support a CCCA club.

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6 hours ago, Billy Kingsley said:

I've said this before and I'm sure I'll say it again, but if you want younger people to get involved, stop insulting cars post WWII. 

 

The majority of any hobby is rekindling fond memories of youth, reminiscing.  For people in my generation that's 70s through 90s cars. 

 

When we get comments about it being "simply a used car" or "should be in the parking lot" it tells us in no uncertain terms: you are not wanted here. So, of course we aren't going to join your club or attend your events. 

 

I have had that happen on the AACA facebook group. Put me off the club for literally years. I only gave a second chance to the club because, despite attending 25-30 car shows and cruises a year, I still wanted more car stuff in my life. This forum seemed active and wasn't about chopping every identifying feature off of a car. So I'm decided to give it a try...and I'm still here. 

Billy, sorry that happened but the GROUP page.  We took it over a few years ago when it was headed in the wrong direction.  If you have been there lately it is heavily populated by newer cars and the moderators all are into Post-War cars, even I have two!  Being a group page made up of many, many non AACA members we get all sorts of viewpoints.  Hopefully, we are keeping the insults to a dull roar.

 

Lots of would like to say here but rushing to get out of here for our event in Charlotte, NC this weekend.  Should be a good show!

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17 hours ago, Steve_Mack_CT said:

I just grabbed my Model A News and cannot for the life of me find a member count or magazine distrbution count.  Will look again tonight.  I think MAFCA and MARC both have a pretty good membership base, I would guess a very significant number belong to both clubs which are essentially the same.

I could be wrong, but if you look in your (most likely) December issue, there should be a 3526-R form reprinted as required by the USPS which provides circulation numbers for that particular publication.

 

It will appear like this:  https://about.usps.com/forms/ps3526r.pdf

 

Craig

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1 hour ago, bryankazmer said:

Billy hits on an important issue for the "rolling admission" clubs, but not a new one.  WWII has been a rather arbitrary break point in the hobby for a long time.  But how much different is a 46 from a 42, choose your make?  I think the other major break point is around 1970-72 when early smog controls went in, and 1970 and 1975 cars do drive very differently, to put it kindly.

 

Joint meets make sense to me.  Packard and Studebaker combined for a National meet a few years ago in South Bend.  There were no crises that I saw, although where to put the 57-58 Packardbakers was perhaps a question.

That was in 2007 when there was the combined Studebaker and Packard meet in South Bend.  It was great, and would love to see it happen more often.

 

I am still trying to get my head wrapped around Billy's comment about people insulting cars Post WW2.  Some of my favorites are cars and TRUCKS are from 1946 to 1972, ( and with very few exceptions from 1973 to the early 1980's) and again starting in the later 1980's until present day.  I've read Autocar and other British car magazines since the 1970's, and would envy those across the pond and 'down unda' who still got good looking cars after 1973 with bumpers that were designed to appear they were part of the car, and decent performance.     I do NOT stick my nose up at an unmolested Subaru WRX STi from the early 2000's when I see one at a car show.

 

Craig 

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I understand what Billy said about post war cars, I have not been insulted, or excluded but I do feel there is a bit of division. More so say post Viet Nam War.  50's and early 60's seem to always be in vogue. However I have a 1977 and a 1979 and feel like they are a bit 'new' compared to most. However when I go to a show, I hardly see anything that is pre 1950, the fibreglass duece coupe excluded.  My 70's cars are closing in on 50 years old, In 1970 a 1920 car was 50yrs old, and I am sure that was the core group at that time.  

 

I enjoy ALL old cars, one of the reasons I belong to AACA. I really could care less at this point if I am at an organized event and someone thinks my car is too new, I enjoyed restoring it and now I enjoy driving it. My motto has always been Live and Let Live. 

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I think possibly every generation of collector who focuses on a set era ( that they like the best or perhaps can afford the best? know how to fix easier?) goes through a period when they think that they are being shunned because of what they own. Maybe if you feel you are being looked askance at , it is worth going up to the "offending" person and asking them ' so tell me about your car, its a lot older then mine and I really would like to know more about it'  You are not putting down what you own but perhaps are letting the other collector know that you appreciate that his car is a decade ( or 3 or 5 ) older then yours . You are not making excuses but are letting them know you are a " car person " as well.

In the mid 1960s when I got into the "old" cars it was with a 30 year old car - pre WWI brass era cars were what was considered and old car or an antique car then . I was never put off or put down for what I owned. Try to meet someone half way, try to be the one to break the ice to start a conversation , it works both ways.

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9 minutes ago, Walt G said:

...every generation of collector who focuses on a set era...goes through a period when they think that they are being shunned...

 

One of our local members, who is a Past President

of the AACA, says when he first joined around 1972,

his 1940 Pontiac was disparaged by someone as just

a used car.  It almost turned him away, but he persevered.

 

Almost all members are supportive, so never let a few

opinions sully your show!  We all have our favorites.  But

for someone to like only pre-1942 cars--criticizing anything

less than 70 years old--is absurd.  When the AACA was

founded in 1935, would such people disparage ANY old car

and like only horses born before 1865?!

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1 hour ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

When the AACA was

founded in 1935, would such people disparage ANY old car

and like only horses born before 1865?!

AACA didn't always have the 25-year-old acceptance rule, nor even pre-World War II.  I still have my 1969 Judging Standards Handbook, all eight half-size pages of it, which allows for judging only vehicles through 1937 plus a couple of CCCA marques through 1941.

 

Therein lies one of the problems:  The umbrella organizations (AACA, VMCCA) plus the single-marque still-in-production clubs like Cadillac are inclusive and I like it that way.  Nevertheless, those clubs have the difficult task of having their publications and activities accommodate 95 years of eligible production (that is 120 years less 25-yr rule).  AACA and Cadillac are very successful at this, VMCCA not so much.  For a variety of reasons, most of us focus on one period, maybe 25 years, of that 95-yr eligibility.  Clubs rightfully focus their touring activity on those elements where participants can "keep up," which is why there are 1- and 2-cylinder tours.

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I belong to three National club's. The A.A.C.A., National Woodie Club and M.A.R.C.  I am very happy with all three and appreciate what the officers and staff do, "behind the scenes". At one time I belonged to two smaller local car club's, but quit both. The problem with the smaller club's was that it seemed like every meeting there was some sort of disagreement, about some petty issue and it always got out of hand. Screaming, accusations, threats all over dues, jacket's, hat's, car show's, new members and other nonsense. I see several of the members and they ask me to re-join but it's simply not for me.

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46 woodie - I have experienced the same ( here on long island) over the years. Certain people think they know any and all because they may have been in the hobby longer - are SENIOR members . Even a local region group that I helped start ( get passed by a national club as being part of it)  I walked away from because of the regional officers letting one guy have his way the way he wanted to run things cause he knew best. Their last on line publication dates from 2012.

Fortunately there are still a few club regions /chapters that function well, people get along with each other, egos remain tolerable , events are well planned etc. I found that with the L.I. Buick Club.

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33 minutes ago, 46 woodie said:

I belong to three National club's. The A.A.C.A., National Woodie Club and M.A.R.C.  I am very happy with all three and appreciate what the officers and staff do, "behind the scenes". At one time I belonged to two smaller local car club's, but quit both. The problem with the smaller club's was that it seemed like every meeting there was some sort of disagreement, about some petty issue and it always got out of hand. Screaming, accusations, threats all over dues, jacket's, hat's, car show's, new members and other nonsense. I see several of the members and they ask me to re-join but it's simply not for me.

 

18 minutes ago, Walt G said:

46 woodie - I have experienced the same ( here on long island) over the years. Certain people think they know any and all because they may have been in the hobby longer - are SENIOR members . Even a local region group that I helped start ( get passed by a national club as being part of it)  I walked away from because of the regional officers letting one guy have his way the way he wanted to run things cause he knew best. Their last on line publication dates from 2012.

Fortunately there are still a few club regions /chapters that function well, people get along with each other, egos remain tolerable , events are well planned etc. I found that with the L.I. Buick Club.

 

Myself also, on Long Island as well.

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M.A.R.C. ? Mid Atlantic Radio Club for collectors of Antique radios ? My kinda stuff.

 

Personally am interested in anything since and including Cugnot's trike. May have near every Clymer book but generally come back to the "Steam Car Scrapbook" often.

 

So cars, computers, and radios - have a warm spot for all and the issues of keeping running. Understand some are probably aghast at the notion of sealing a leaking E-type power brake with an inner tube but when the real power brake unit is NLA and getting one rebuilt is a months long endeavor and have a couple of old 6.00-16 types at hand...

 

Grew up mostly with European cars so used Jags were cheap (quickly found out why, 40 psi @ 3000 rpm is hardwired in my brane.)

 

GTOAA was formed because GTOs were too new for POCI. The roads must roll.

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2 hours ago, Grimy said:

AACA didn't always have the 25-year-old acceptance rule, nor even pre-World War II.  I still have my 1969 Judging Standards Handbook, all eight half-size pages of it, which allows for judging only vehicles through 1937 plus a couple of CCCA marques through 1941.

 

Therein lies one of the problems:  The umbrella organizations (AACA, VMCCA) plus the single-marque still-in-production clubs like Cadillac are inclusive and I like it that way.  Nevertheless, those clubs have the difficult task of having their publications and activities accommodate 95 years of eligible production (that is 120 years less 25-yr rule).  AACA and Cadillac are very successful at this, VMCCA not so much.  For a variety of reasons, most of us focus on one period, maybe 25 years, of that 95-yr eligibility.  Clubs rightfully focus their touring activity on those elements where participants can "keep up," which is why there are 1- and 2-cylinder tours.

We have discussed that issue in the past, when it came to driving tours.

 

Another 'problem' I have seen in marque car clubs that cover 100+ years are the demographics the said marque was marketed at, and how it made or ruined its reputation.  I'm trying to imagine the poor 20 year old who thinks he really has something when he parks his 18,000 mile Cimarron beside a classic 1930's V16 or an Eldorado Brougham, and he finds out the rude reality from those who remember them new. 

 

Craig

Edited by 8E45E (see edit history)
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2 hours ago, 8E45E said:

I'm trying to imagine the poor 20 year old who thinks he really has something when he parks his 18,000 mile Cimarron beside a classic 1930's V16...

 

I'd like to see a Cadillac Cimarron.  At a large AACA

national meet, there's usually a V-16 from the most

common production years, but I've never seen a

Cimarron.  Excellence, but never pretentiousness,

impresses me in all aspects of life.

 

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)
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I would bet that the 'poor 20yo cimarron owner' would be just as proud or even prouder of the car he arrived in as the person that brought the v16 caddy! Hypothetically of course, the poor Cimarron owner has skrimped and saved to enjoy ownership of an 'antique car'. He found a low mileage original example that his hard earned money he had been saving for the last few years now can buy. The 16 cyl Caddy owner on the other has just another blue chip investment to show off until hes bored enough with it to sell and get something different. I have been to shows and seen an AMC Pacer garner more attention than cars 10 times the value.  Just because it is expensive doesnt mean it has to be loved, and just because it was a more pedestrian car doesnt mean it has to be hated.

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