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I understand hotrods have their appeal, but what I don't understand is why you would advertise the car below as a "1926 Buick" - is it done because of preferential registration treatment? 

 

164796455150?hash=item265ea258ee:g:IzsAAhttps://www.ebay.com/itm/1926-Buick-Roadster/164796455150?hash=item265ea258ee:g:IzsAAOSwNzRf3CHl

 

164796455150?hash=item265ea258ee:g:IzsAAI suspect many members on here will have a similar opinion as me on this car, but I'm more interested as to why it would be being represented as a "1926 Buick" 

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7 hours ago, hidden_hunter said:

I understand hotrods have their appeal, but what I don't understand is why you would advertise the car below as a "1926 Buick" - is it done because of preferential registration treatment? 

 

164796455150?hash=item265ea258ee:g:IzsAAhttps://www.ebay.com/itm/1926-Buick-Roadster/164796455150?hash=item265ea258ee:g:IzsAAOSwNzRf3CHl

 

164796455150?hash=item265ea258ee:g:IzsAAI suspect many members on here will have a similar opinion as me on this car, but I'm more interested as to why it would be being represented as a "1926 Buick" 

 

The body obviously is a fiberglass replica of a 26-27 Ford roadster.  I suspect the name comes from the engine.  The description says it's an "Iron Duke" which was developed by Pontiac.  It ended up in Buicks and all GM marques except Cadillac, as well as AMC.  Course the Buick badge on the radiator shell further confuses the issue.  I suppose it is whatever it's titled as.

 

It's a cool little hot rod.  I like both hot rods and antiques.  In any case, no Buicks or Fords were harmed in the building of this one.

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