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48 Lin Brake Problem.?


Cokekid
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Just once when I complete a installation I wish it would work. I finished installing the wheel cylinder and cleaned up the drum. When I installed the drum and tried to turn it  by hand I found out the drum would be tight, As you can see that the adjuster is completely closed. 

 

Gerry

 

 

1425794389_LINLEFTFRONTBRAKES03855.JPG.f020cfadca565d8b12bc7bcc60f203c5.JPG333222343_LINLEFTFRONTADJUSTER03856.JPG.cd5e0f9e2e04c638e290967f1bdf9842.JPG

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It looks like this is the drivers-side front, so the shorter length lining in the front appears correct. How bad is it dragging, will it turn by hand at all? You may have already tried; but sometimes after all drums in place, will need to apply good brake pedal pressure to center the whole brake shoe assembly inside the drum, allowing enough clearance to allow the drum to turn until it polishes up more to spin more free. Paul

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40ZephSeadn

 

When I try and tun it to the left it is tight. If I turn it clock wise there is a bit of drag, . I did both front cylinders so I tried both drums on the passengers side and they both spin freely. I am unable ti use the brake system as I am replacing all of the brake lines. Maybe it must have something to do with the shoes.

 

I am just going to have to play around with it until I get the lines done.

 

Thanks 

Gerry

   

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I am still having a problem with the drivers side to get the drum on. Here is maybe my problem.

 

If I take the Primer Shoe from the Passenger side and install it in the drivers side the drum will go on. I decided put both Primer Shoes together side by side and this is what I found. The right shoe has a little more shoe on it.

The passenger shoe is the bottom one. 

 

Could this be the problem. Also in saying this, I originally did take both drums off.

 

In not to further confuse the problem. Did I do some thing wrong when rebuilding the Wheel Cylinder, Should I have been able to push the Wheel Piston back and forth by my hand.?

 

 

 

 

lLIN BAD SHOE #1 03858.JPG

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a couple things  I have found out while rebuilding brakes on old Lincolns. I never cared for "glued on shoes" on my cars, I like rivets. Check the thickness of your shoe material, there are specs on this .  I would have that one short shoe redone. I always have my shoes "cam ground"

to match each drum- that is--- 100%  shoe contact  to that drum. Go back again and check ( Motors Repair Manual)   major and minor 

adjustments. I hope this helps---Larry

 

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Larry

If I have to get new shoes I will get ones with rivets. I also will do some reaching  as were to find out the specs for these shoes.

 I checked the Manual for both adjustments and as one of my photo shows the star wheel cannot be closed anymore then it already is.

 

Let you know what happens.

 

 

 

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Larry

 

I decided to remove the wheel cylinder and push the pistons on each side a little further in. After installing the cylinder back in I was able to get the drum although  it's still a little tight to turn the drum. For the time being  I am going to leave it  alone  now and go to work on the rear brakes.

 

Seeing I needed a special tool to take them off, I am guessing they just install like any drums by sliding them on. 

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The 2 outer shoe springs have more than enough strength to overcome the small spring inside the cylinder and push the pistons back toward the center as far as they need to go. As Larry said, glued linings may bulge out a little if too much adhesive is used, or if the lining bows out a little before the adhesive sets.  Can you rough up the linings and rub on some yellow chalk (or an indicator that won't affect the friction) and then spin with drum on to see where your high spot is rubbing on the lining?   I have also had problem before with adjusters that were initially very rusted, have to use a flat file to clean out the grooves in both ends of the adjuster so the shoes can fully retract at the bottom.  Or possibly crud in the inside of the female adjuster half, causing the male end of the adjuster to bottom out in the threads against the crud before it is fully closed/retracted.

 

Even if the drum is tight, if you can spin it on new linings, you probably are not very far off.  You don't need much more clearance, maybe only a few thousandths more. When I look at your 1st pic, it appears there is a bigger gap than mine where the two shoes meet at the top stud.  Might check to see if any reason why the 2 shoes are not closing tight against the top stud.  Just don't want shoes dragging much when you first drive; only takes a short distance to overheat the linings, and smoke/glaze them, because it ruins them & lose a lot of stopping power.

 

Also, is it possible the blue shoes are a matched pair and should both be used on the same side, as the front and back shoes?  Paul

1588730760_Topbrakeshoestud.jpg.00847750dc552f600ff7e4e1e1d37873.jpg

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Paul,

 

I think my problem is with the one shoe.It does not line up with the left side shoe. I will follow your instruction on  marking the shoes and marking the shoe and spinning it to see were the high spot is rubbing. As for the adjusters I cleaned them and they are working fine.

 

I never thought that maybe they are a matched pair. Can you use two Primary shoes on one wheel.?

 

 

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Paul,

 

Followed your advice about making a mark to identify a high spot, The drum was catching on the top side of each shoe. I lightly sande both spots and the drum will now turn.

 

I have another question regarding installing the rear drums. Both drums go on only till the end of the axle shaft is showing.  Should they have slid on all the way.?

 

I also will be starting a new post with t I think is a axle problem 

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I would take a hacksaw and shorten the longer of the 2 primary shoes and then sand or grind a short bevel  on the end. The longer  primary shoe may cause pulling and erratic brake operation.

 

I usually leave the bleeder screw open when I install new shoes. This allows the cylinder piston to move inward and allow the shoes to seat on the anchor pin.

 

Make sure that the key is installed correctly on the rear axles and fully seated in the keyway. The drums should slide almost all of the way with about 1 turn of the nut to bring them tight against the backing plate.

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Tom,

 

I was thinking about doing this but I was not sure what would happen if I did it. Seeing you would have done it, I'm  going to follow your advice. 

 

The drums don't exactly slide on all the way. I will have to take a look at what is stopping them from sliding on. 

 

I will also examine how the key is installed. 

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Tom,

 

I went out a removed both Primary Shoes in order to measure how much material to remove. When I put the one on top of the other this is what I discovered 

 

The first photo  showing shoes from were they connect to the Anchor pin.The top one is to long, When you look at the second photo it shows the bottom shoe to long. What I thing happened is, one of these shoes was glued on and the other one was not aligned with the first one.  

 

Any suggestion as what I can now do.

 

538047614_LINLONGSHOE03864.JPG.d9383404571b8b6ce56c546610d487ed.JPG164707901_lLINBADSHOE103858.JPG.3126d3f55ba240a01d0b48068f91f285.JPG

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I would send the shoes back to the supplier and ask for a set that was put together correctly. There is no excuse for such sloppy workmanship.

 

Brake shops that do drum brakes are long gone form most areas of the country, and the ones that are around want a fortune to reline shoes. I found 2 shops, 1 wanted $80 a wheel to reline the shoes and another $80 to fit the shoes to the drum. The other shop wanted $150 per wheel including fitting the shoes to the drum. I bought new shoes from Kanter for way less money and they fit the drums.

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Tom,

 

I had bought these shoes a few years ago from one of our vendors and I cannot remember who it was . I looked around my area for anybody who handles shoes but was unable to find one.

 

For now I am putting this job on the back burner for now.

 

 

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