Jump to content

Some of the best money you will spend


Recommended Posts

Zimm63,

 

    The one wire system is just that, a one wire system.  The only one who can tell has been converted to Electronic is you & the installer.

ALL parts are included. Including a screwdriver & an Allen wrench, plus instructions.

 

The advantages are:

Single wire so systm operation preserves stock appearance & simplify's wiring

Active dwell control maintains high RPM spark energy while reducing coil heating at idle.

Auto-standby prevents coil damage/overheating or dead battery if ignition is left on & also while troubleshooting for other problems.

Hall Effect rotary-vane sensor design compensates for worn bearings/bushings & distributor endplay. 

Magnetic sensor is unaffected by oil, dirt, water or other contaminants, unlike optical systems.

Over-current/over-voltage protected against damage from high amp battery chargers, reversed battery, or improper wiring

No distributor modification, disassembly or removal required.

Constructed with premium quality components. Sealed, hi-temp thermoplastic housing provides exceptional resisance against moisture & vibration.

Easier starting & better running. May even provide better MPG.

Reduced maintenenance.

No rubbing block wear which will keep timing accurate for the life of the unit.

Uses stock resister/resister wiring. No need to run new wiring for a full 12 volts

3 year limited warranty.

 

Any other questions I'm just a phone call or e-mail away.

 

Tom T.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a little experience in useing the Pertronix systems, I went to work for UPS in '79 and all their "package cars" (this is wht they called them) had been converted to the pertronix system. These p cars were 292 GMC, 300 Ford 225 Dodge 6 cly engines.  When a pertronix ingnition works it works great but when they fail they fail immediately and without warning, just like a failed condensor.  This would involve a tow and "service" failures. not good! I worked nights and was on call all day to respond to break downs. I learned quickly to carry an extra Pertronix with me. When I would get a call that the engine had just
"shut down" with no warning I was pretty sure what I would find! I didnt record the number of failed Pertronix but I went on many R-calls that just required a new Pertronix.  I do realize this was the ultimate test with these 35 vehicles used (and or abused) daily but they will fail and without warning , so always have a back up plan!  When we began running the newer P-cars with Factory electronic ign the problem went away!!!...RH  

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, Roadhog1951 said:

I have a little experience in useing the Pertronix systems, I went to work for UPS in '79 and all their "package cars" (this is wht they called them) had been converted to the pertronix system. These p cars were 292 GMC, 300 Ford 225 Dodge 6 cly engines.  When a pertronix ingnition works it works great but when they fail they fail immediately and without warning, just like a failed condensor.  This would involve a tow and "service" failures. not good! I worked nights and was on call all day to respond to break downs. I learned quickly to carry an extra Pertronix with me. When I would get a call that the engine had just
"shut down" with no warning I was pretty sure what I would find! I didnt record the number of failed Pertronix but I went on many R-calls that just required a new Pertronix.  I do realize this was the ultimate test with these 35 vehicles used (and or abused) daily but they will fail and without warning , so always have a back up plan!  When we began running the newer P-cars with Factory electronic ign the problem went away!!!...RH  

  LOL....RH, sounds like we have alot in common! I retired a couple of years ago after a 4 decade career as a UPS mechanic. I loved working for UPS. It was a tight, challenging, no nonsense employer for most of my career and they payed well for it, both short and long term. But because John Q. Public got so soft in the belly, so did our company, needing to conform to what became the typical norm of employment expectations. After my first 3 decades of dedication, it was very disappointing to see the company`s guidelines and standards get watered down, and turn into just another big employer. Still a great company but very different now. Having said that, I remain invested.

  I have shared my experiences as a UPS mechanic as they relate to the early electronic conversions here on the forum many times over the years. If you recall, the company which marketed the electronic ignition conversion product which UPS purchased was called "Perlux". The UPS shops I worked in also used the conversion on the power plants you described. It sounds like you may have been in a rural area? My career was spent in most of the large shops in the Chicago metro area. The larger shops averaged between 200 and 350 package cars and 75 to 150 tractors. Although I spent most of my career in the heavy line, the initial years of my career were spent in the package car fleets because I had logged a handful of years in a general automotive shop before coming to UPS.  I had plenty of experience running road calls (very often my entire 12 hour day, one after another!), partly due to the fact I liked the challenge of on road repair, but I also liked to get outdoors and out of the shop, and I was able to "see" a good sampling and volume of ignition failures. (BTW, remember when it was a source of unnecessary expense and embarrassment to call a tow truck on a road call? Now, it`s SOP...)

 As you know, UPS was very particular about tracking road calls, their causes and prevention. I distinctly recall, after the electronic conversion program was well established, that there was absolutely no difference made in the ignition related road call frequency by the conversion program. In other words, our vehicles broke down due to ignition related failures at the same frequency whether they had mechanical points style ignition systems or the electronic conversion. We had a very large sampling of thousands of vehicles in our district, and nation wide, so I think the statistics were very well established and accurate.

  Having stated the above, maybe Pertronix has made improvements over the original Perlux system? But as you stated, when we started receiving GM engines with their electronic ignition system, all the problems went away as long as tune up intervals were attended to. I cant say the same for Ford products, as I replaced MANY Ford ignition modules in both UPS delivery vans and in my own shop on their passenger cars.

  As it relates to this thread, IF I was going to the trouble and expense to replace the original mechanical points system, I`d convert to a GM HEI system for the reliability, parts availability and the ACTUAL increase and benefits in secondary voltage levels. Having said that, all my vehicles remain as original.

  Sending you a PM Mr. Buster Brown!

Tom Mooney 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, 1965rivgs said:

Having said that, all my vehicles remain as original.

Tom, interesting comments. I was with Pitney Bowes for 31 years. I sold many UPS shipping and weighing systems.

Large corporations are always changing. Could be as we age we not as flexible as we once were? We get fed up and it is time to retire. At age 55 I cashed in my chips and retired.

 

Some advances in technology I think have helped increase reliability and safety of my Riviera. The dual brake cylinder seems to make the car safer, at least I feel that way. Tom Telesco rebuilt my distributor and put in electronic ignition, new plug wires and Bosch Platnum plugs. Tom comes with a performance based perspective. I’m ok with his updates because I believe it will make my car more reliable. I’m not interested in burnouts or 1/4 mile races just when I push on the accelerator the car goes. I believe rebuilding my old nailhead with an eye on the best parts available was a good move. I’ve heard some of the after market kits for rebuilding nailhead engines were not so good. Tom T suggested certain named parts for replacement and some recommendations to refurbish existing engine parts if the old parts could be reconditioned. We have to make decisions on the best info we have and rely on known experts to get things done on our old Buicks.

Some of the repairs I’ve made myself have required the task be done again because I did not do the task in a competent manner. I don’t mind * do-overs as I’m starting to get experience in many areas of the car. Enjoyable activity and keeps me out of trouble.

 

* exceptions for heater core replacement and HVAC  evaporator box install were really hard. I don’t want to do that again.

Turbinator

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...