Jump to content

1936 Cord 810 Phaeton with 327 Chevy Engine


Recommended Posts

Randy,  how does this compare to yours?   I much prefer your period change over and caddy engine.

 

https://www.ebay.com/itm/1936-Cord-810-Phaeton-Rear-Drive-/143991393855

 

1936 Cord Phaeton converted to rear drive probably in the 70's.

327 chevy with a turbo 350 automatic. PS and PB with a floor shift
All original sheet metal, gauges conv top, door hardware, and steering wheel
Older conversion, with very little history. Paint shows age as well as the canvas conv top (see pics)
Runs well  and starts easy. 15 inch tires and drum brakes. Leather interior. Solid body and has supercharged front sheet metal
Please ask for more info.

810PhaetonWithChevyEngine.jpg

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well his is running and driving.  Cosmetically overall it's a little nicer than mine of course.  Probably because it's atleast 30 years fresher.  Similar idea between the two.  I saw it says it has 15 inch wheels but looks like original hubcaps? 

I like the nostalgia aspect of mine being an old rod. 

Now if they were sitting there side by side for the same price I would buy this one if the body is really clean in the nooks and crannies, because it's a running car.  Someone i sent it to that was looking for a car like mine but was hung up on the fact mine was inop. said they were contacted by the guy (they believe it's the same guy) as they have ads out looking for one and believes he wants 90G for it,  or did then.  So at that well you would have alot of room to get mine on the road and looking good with probably a nice chunk of change left over and a pile of original parts you could always sell as mine is almost half as much. 

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

auburnseeker, To facilitate others in finding it, I am posting a link to your Cord below to enable an easier comparison of the two cars. For me, it's interesting to see the difference in approach between the the two conversions. 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by rg171352 (see edit history)
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If priced Right it will find a home. People buy reproduction Auburn Speedsters, and reproduction Cords. The asking price on some of those cars are high. A lot of that can have to do with quality of the build. But a buyer willing to purchase a reproduction car. Would also consider a real car, with a different drive train. In my opinion.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The fun thing is that you can show up atmostACD meets and be welcome with such a conversion.  I like it too, though the rats nest of wiring and rubber hose fuel line makes me question the whole build.  Small details that are iffy can sometimes mean big details are iffy too....

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, auburnseeker said:

Well his is running and driving.  Cosmetically overall it's a little nicer than mine of course.  Probably because it's atleast 30 years fresher.  Similar idea between the two.  I saw it says it has 15 inch wheels but looks like original hubcaps? 

I like the nostalgia aspect of mine being an old rod. 

Now if they were sitting there side by side for the same price I would buy this one if the body is really clean in the nooks and crannies, because it's a running car.  Someone i sent it to that was looking for a car like mine but was hung up on the fact mine was inop. said they were contacted by the guy (they believe it's the same guy) as they have ads out looking for one and believes he wants 90G for it,  or did then.  So at that well you would have alot of room to get mine on the road and looking good with probably a nice chunk of change left over and a pile of original parts you could always sell as mine is almost half as much. 

 

 

I'm wondering how he got those hubcaps to work?

 

I like yours better from a coolness "period" hot rod factor,  but he does have the running/driving advantage.

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Auburnseekers car is a better set up with the vintage motor. But a 350 Chev is a great engine, and can be dressed out with reproduction Corvette engine goodies. You can make that engine look like a vintage Vette engine.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 minutes ago, alsancle said:

We have a little bit of a resto mod vs period hot rod thing going on and I love period hot rods but have no time for resto rods.   Plus I always side with the stick car.

You could probably swap that TH350 for an M-20 without too much trouble.  Judging from the location of the master cylinder, you may even be able to get a clutch pedal in there without too much effort.  I feel like you'd need to take Xander's idea and dress it as a vintage Corvette engine.  

 

For me, I like seeing the active side pipes on Randy's car versus the fakes on the ebay car.  It somehow ads an air of legitimacy to the car to know the flex tubes aren't just for decoration.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I figured if I ever restored my car those pies were going to be functional.  Believe it or not I have seen a few stock Cords with pipes that had no exhaust running through them.   Kind of like a Corvette with sidepipes but the exhaust really just comes out the rear. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well now, you all know my name, and the car I would go for. But my preferences certainly don’t need to influence anyone else. The greatest ROI for Randy’s Cordillac would be to get it going and stopping. The value added would exceed the cost to get there. But being astonished by Randy’s genius productivity and family responsibilities, I suppose there is only so much gas left in the tank on any given day. Auburn comes first not being the least of tasks on hand. I can’t remember : what is it standing in the way of roadworthyness ?   -  Cadillac 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My car is a typical car that hasn't run in 45 years.  Figure it needs everything mechanically and if it doesn't then you got a bonus.  I no longer figure any non running car is going to be just gas, file the points and go.  (even the running ones I have bought lately needed a bunch of work to make them roadworthy) They all need brakes , tires, Usually exhaust,  engine work from a valve job to a complete rebuild in many cases.  Only bonus is I have a completely rebuilt Caddy flathead with paperwork I would throw in the deal. That would save the cost of rebuilding one. 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
8 hours ago, BucketofBolts said:

Not know why but is the wheelbase the same as a correct 1936 CORD? Appears to me to have a shorter wheelbase. Am I mistaken? 

 

The track on the rear end is wrong,  at least a couple inches too wide in back.    But the wheelbase is correct.   Can't imagine how you could change that, at least easily.

Edited by alsancle (see edit history)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Looks like top bid was 24,100 with reserve not met. 

That one really tanked.  

I have a few thoughts about why.  

A reserve auction always seems to really dampen the bidding spirit.  Though with cars it's really tough because no reserve means a high opening bid and that doesn't invite bidders either.

I sell stuff consistently higher than others even with those with cheaper buy it nows because of stupid cheap opening bids and no reserve.  You have to get the base excited and believe they are going to win it.

Secondly I agree those photos, mainly the lead photo, was not the best choice to garner serious money.  It just doesn't have that sparkle to excite people. 

Finally there was mention of it not being on ebay motors.  With ebay's new search I have had alot of trouble trying to refine searches to find what I'm looking for and gave up looking for many items.  (this is a recent change in the last 2 weeks) that with ebay chasing customers away doesn't help.  

 

Any one else have any thoughts?

You can't tell me even the modified Cord market has dropped this much. 

As Xander mentioned they sell glass Auburn speedsters that are poorly done for more money. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not showing correctly in eBay motors was a big deal.  Also, not the greatest auction. You need lots of crystal clear photos, especially underneath.

 

A real 851/852 Speedster is about 4 to 5 times the price of a real 810/812 open car.  But still, I would think the subject car should be worth 50k.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

In my opinion, a Cord is a special interest vehicle. It is not a car that comes up in conversation in many car circles. Very historically significant, but the main following for them is in the ACD, restored original side of the car world. That puts the car in an odd place in the market. What is the value? It is modified, but it is still a open Cord. The restoration side frowns on it. And looks at the cost to make it right. That is a lot, and it will never be right by the numbers. So people into these cars are turned off for a few reasons. People who are into customs/hot rods/street rods do not look to Cords as an ideal project. Or will judge the car on how it was done and with what. A 327/350 is not where the market is. LS engines, six speed transmissions, air conditioning, four wheel disk brakes and other improvements will increase the desirability on that side. The chosen components, and the quality of the build will all play a part. That car falls into a grey area of the market. Like street rodding your V12 Packard Roadster. When a known value can be achieved restored, you can roll the dice by modifying a car. As to the finished value. Some cars are worth more when updated, some are worth less. This is a car that is not really worth less. It just has to have the quality in components and build to be able to hit a high value. My Jaguar roadster is a good example. What will it be worth when finished. Restored value is easy to guess, market sales tells you that. I like the Cord listed for sale, also like Auburnseekers Cord. But I dwell on both sides of the car world. Both cars can be bought at a good buy in price for what you are buying. But you have to like what is there. Great cars to do an all electric convertion on. But again, cost involved will turn most people away. I would look at both cars if I was in the market for one. A good opportunity to get into a very significant car, and enjoy the side of the car world it opens up. Just have to be able to drop the money.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just heard from a friend that followed up on this Cord and the owner said he would take $75,000 for it. 

Puts it in a weird area.  Not much more or actually real close money with some shopping and you can get a running original phaeton. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...

Hey guys I'm new to the forum my first post actually. I wanted to comment on this thread as I just purchased a 1936 cord from my uncles estate. He has owned it since the 50s and it has been stored in his garages and barns from 1985 on. Unfortunately back in the 50s he couldn't afford an OEM motor. Plus I don't think that's what they did back then it was all about hot rodding I believe they put a V-8 out of a Buick in the car. I'm headed up to Idaho next month to pick it up. I would like to identify some kind of casting numbers or Vin number on the car. Do you guys have any information how I can accomplish this? From what I was reading I know one of the serial numbers would be on the engine which is long gone. Although I would like to bring it back to factory I'm not sure if it's going to be feasible to do that I guess I'll have to wait until I get to the car. Anyways I'm excited to own such a cool piece of American history and bring back my uncles car to life. I have owned a few hot rods but nothing from this era and this would be my first antique car.

 

Anything I should be looking for are out for on this car would be helpful. What do you think a non-running cord in barn fine condition without the original motor or transmission would be worth? When I get to Idaho I'll take lots of photos and be sure to register it with the crew here. I'm pretty sure this is one of the lost ones since it's been tucked away so long. Also if anybody is in the Idaho area or Spokane Washington I'll be heading up through California that way. If any of you were out that way and are looking to part with a car trailer I'm thinking about purchasing one on the way up.

 

0BA1B927-F3D8-48A7-8800-275B6A2EC70A.JPG.a1b06285c2d7c414e8527fd6841d3872.JPG

Joe 

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, jdelima said:

Hey guys I'm new to the forum my first post actually. I wanted to comment on this thread as I just purchased a 1936 cord from my uncles estate. He has owned it since the 50s and it has been stored in his garages and barns from 1985 on. Unfortunately back in the 50s he couldn't afford an OEM motor. Plus I don't think that's what they did back then it was all about hot rodding I believe they put a V-8 out of a Buick in the car. I'm headed up to Idaho next month to pick it up. I would like to identify some kind of casting numbers or Vin number on the car. Do you guys have any information how I can accomplish this? From what I was reading I know one of the serial numbers would be on the engine which is long gone. Although I would like to bring it back to factory I'm not sure if it's going to be feasible to do that I guess I'll have to wait until I get to the car. Anyways I'm excited to own such a cool piece of American history and bring back my uncles car to life. I have owned a few hot rods but nothing from this era and this would be my first antique car.

 

Anything I should be looking for are out for on this car would be helpful. What do you think a non-running cord in barn fine condition without the original motor or transmission would be worth? When I get to Idaho I'll take lots of photos and be sure to register it with the crew here. I'm pretty sure this is one of the lost ones since it's been tucked away so long. Also if anybody is in the Idaho area or Spokane Washington I'll be heading up through California that way. If any of you were out that way and are looking to part with a car trailer I'm thinking about purchasing one on the way up.

 

Joe 

 

 

Welcome Joe.

 

Start your own thread here so we don't confuse topics:

 

https://forums.aaca.org/forum/86-our-cars-restoration-projects/

 

You have an 810 or 812 Cord (depending on if it is a36 or 37)  "Phaeton".   Which is a 5 passenger 2 door convertible.   Join the ACD club as soon as  possible:   https://www.acdclub.org/

 

Once you have your own thread going I can give you a few more comments.   We have another member with basically the same car that and other Cord owners here. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...