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Any idea this neon?


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Look at the back to try to see if it is modern repro.....in case it's going for big bucks. 

 

Front looks too new, too clean, to me but I'm no expert on if Sealed Power ever made these in neon back in the day.

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I agree with the reproduction vote. It just looks too clean, with no trace of surface rust on any of the components. Also, if you look at the picture that shows the switch and cord, it looks like they are using a rubber grommet as an insulator. If it was original I doubt that they would do that. 

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The rubber grommets are above the on/off switch on the neon.  They are common hardware items.  Seems unusual that the Sealed Power name does not show up somewhere if it’s original.  What matters is whether you like it and the price is acceptable to you.  Lots of reproduction items are sold to people who just want the look without having to pay exorbitant prices. 

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14 minutes ago, TerryB said:

The rubber grommets are above the on/off switch on the neon.  They are common hardware items.  Seems unusual that the Sealed Power name does not show up somewhere if it’s original.  What matters is whether you like it and the price is acceptable to you.  Lots of reproduction items are sold to people who just want the look without having to pay exorbitant prices. 

I think it must be a fantasy art piece, and the lack of the Sealed Power name would then make it more of a saleable piece for anybody including decorators that would not want that name on there? 

 

 I ran a few image searches and there is nothing even close.  It just doesn't look right to me.  I even did a member search for items on ebay from a Massachusetts guy who deals and collects the very rarest porcelain auto signs, but nothing is currently listed to be able to contact him to ask about this neon sign. He bought 2 expensive signs in person from me 13 years ago and he definitely knows what is genuine or not.

 

Maybe let this thread go a few days in hopes that an AACA member had seen one at Hershey back in the days of all original sign sales.  If nobody has ever seen one...then... I would not pay crazy money, and then take it apart and find evidence of it being a brand new piece. 

 

Don't forget; you did ask for opinions. ;)  We all have those..

.

 

.

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3 minutes ago, F&J said:

I even did a member search for items on ebay from a Massachusetts guy who deals and collects the very rarest porcelain auto signs, but nothing is currently listed to be able to contact him to ask about this neon sign.

I just ran a search with the guys last name and it shows he even wrote a book in 2005 just on signs.  I can't find a company contact page in this search below, but the book is still available so maybe he is still alive. No idea on how to contact him.

https://www.bing.com/search?q=amistadi+vintage+signs&form=EDGENT&qs=PF&cvid=cebe4b9dd941470aa2e65306057fd335&cc=US&setlang=en-US

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7 minutes ago, Chris Bamford said:

Hard to tell in the last photo, but those look like modern machine screws with the combination flat and square drive heads. 

Suppose they are and this particular sign has been refurbished/restored and these were used. Does the value go down on an original sign that has been restored?

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9 minutes ago, Chris Bamford said:

Hard to tell in the last photo, but those look like modern machine screws with the combination flat and square drive heads. 

It is rivets in the tabs

 

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37 minutes ago, Sdcookie2 said:

It is rivets in the tabs

 

 

To my eye, these ones look like big-box store machine screws.

 

Not saying that this sign isn't an original, but these fasteners are not old.

 

If the sign is a restored original, I wonder what trauma the original machine screws suffered such that they had to be replaced...

 

 

Piston ring sign.png

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I'm pretty sure the way that "can" is notched to form it around the sign and back is not normally found on originals, nor is the use of rivets like that. If they are modern "pop rivets" its either an incorrect restoration or something else. I think knowing the history or provenance needs to be a factor in determine its authenticity.  If the dealer is representing it as an original, he must have some reason to believe it is, and knowing that would help with verification.  I agree the lack of other advertising (product name) on it is an issue.  These also usually had the sign makers  name or logo someplace on them, like a bottom edge.  I too have done an internet and auction search and turn up nothing.  In person inspection though might be necessary to be certain. Try contacting Dan Matthews at The Authentication Co. (TAC) for an expert opinion.  You've not mentioned the price so I'm assuming it's a substantial amount.

Let us know what more you find out. 

Terry

 

Edited by Terry Bond (see edit history)
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2 hours ago, Chris Bamford said:

Hard to tell in the last photo, but those look like modern machine screws with the combination flat and square drive heads. 

Just emailed Dan Matthews he got back to me in minutes, he says it is a fantasy piece, he doesn't authenticate through photos so he didn't give a value

 

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4 hours ago, Terry Bond said:

If it's a fantasy piece it has value only as a decorative item. That depends on how much you like it and are ok spending.  What is the asking price?

Terry

$1800

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Sdcookie2,

                               Personally $1,800 sounds a little high to me for a reproduced piece.

After an exhaustive search, I turned up this image of an original.  Perhaps if you shared it with the seller he may reconsider his asking price.

 

643821766_beanpower.png.9986a82af14d79835f2299967bd6a50f.png

 

 

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54 minutes ago, GregLaR said:

Sdcookie2,

                               Personally $1,800 sounds a little high to me for a reproduced piece.

After an exhaustive search, I turned up this image of an original.  Perhaps if you shared it with the seller he may reconsider his asking price.

 

643821766_beanpower.png.9986a82af14d79835f2299967bd6a50f.png

 

 

Now that is funny 🤣

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So new about $300, extra $1500 must be for patina. Is it claimed to work ?

+1 Terry, we stop learning, we die.

Internet is like Jeopardy. Key to finding anything  is in forming a question in the form of an answer.

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Too many things make it look like it's a new, fabricated piece. New screws, pie cut's rather than a rolled outer ring, pop rivets, modern cord and plug, and weather proof cover on the toggle switch. Also, if you look at the the sheetmetal that is behind the figures hair and arm, it looks like it was hammered to form the curve. If it was a production part they would have stamped that part out. I'm not saying that the maker built it to deceive anyone, but probably just fabricated a unique decorative piece.

Edited by 46 woodie
spelling correction (see edit history)
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I worked for a sign company in the late '50's, the construction is not typical of how we custom made neons in the day.  It almost looks to me to have been made using the bottom portion of a 5 gallon can.  I'm not troubled by the cord, round black rubber cords existed then, but pop rivets weren't around then, we used regular flat head brass rivets, set by hand using a riveting hammer and a dolly.   Regarding its cleanliness, it may have been intended to be an inside sign as evidenced by the single hanging hole in the back, perhaps for mounting up high on a wall, in which case it would not become very dirty or weathered.   Not seen is an Underwriter's Lab sticker which would have had to be affixed certifying electrical standards were met. 
P. S.  When the company closed, the owner invited me to take any signs laying around that I wanted.  I found 3 Nash signs, 2 Chevrolet's and a "Seasons Greetings", all small neon window hanging ones which I still have.  What I passed up still brings tears to my eyes, huge vertical outdoor dealership signs, a Packard one in particular stands out in my memory.  Where do you store 12'-15' high signs while living in an apartment?  

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30 minutes ago, Dave Henderson said:

Where do you store 12'-15' high signs while living in an apartment?

That's exactly the problem I had when I first began collecting "stuff" back in the 70s.   The Navy only allowed so much weight when we moved. 

Terry

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