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Automotive parts in industrial applications


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I've seen lots of old flathead Fords running irrigation pumps in the fields.

 

Have you ever seen the videos on YT of old air raid sirens powered by Hemis? Even Don Garlits has one in his museum he restored and takes to car shows.

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Buick engines for jet engine start carts. 

 

Model A engine with two cylinders firing, two cylinders pumping air as an air compressor. Saw it at "Field Day of the Past" in Rockville, Virginia

 

Also saw an Oliver tractor that had a GMC V-12 stuck in it. One of those rare GMC V-6s cast en bloc (as in one block) for over the road tractor use in the early 60s. 702 Cubic Inches.

 

Seen several different car engines on old sawmills on farms in Southside VA.

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1 hour ago, Studemax said:

I've seen lots of old flathead Fords running irrigation pumps in the fields.

 

Have you ever seen the videos on YT of old air raid sirens powered by Hemis? Even Don Garlits has one in his museum he restored and takes to car shows.

These things are awesome. Well, maybe not for the neighbors.

Edited by AL1630 (see edit history)
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I think Chrysler must have made more industrial flathead sixes than the automotive version they put in their 1930's-1950's cars and trucks!

 

I've had payloaders, Draglines, tractors, pumps, screening plants, buzz-saws, welders and compressors all powered by those low tech, low maintenance, ultra-reliable pre- "Slant Six" engines and to this day you still can't go to an old equipment or farm auction without finding a few examples of them in the machinery row. 

 

I have at least 5 of them here now in or out of various machines and have never owned (with the notable exception of an ass-busting  Chrysler "Snow Runner") a Mopar.

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26 minutes ago, dustycrusty said:

I think Chrysler must have made more industrial flathead sixes than the automotive version they put in their 1930's-1950's cars and trucks!

 

I've had payloaders, Draglines, tractors, pumps, screening plants, buzz-saws, welders and compressors all powered by those low tech, low maintenance, ultra-reliable pre- "Slant Six" engines and to this day you still can't go to an old equipment or farm auction without finding a few examples of them in the machinery row. 

 

I have at least 5 of them here now in or out of various machines and have never owned (with the notable exception of an ass-busting  Chrysler "Snow Runner") a Mopar.

Indeed they did!

 

I have seen flathead six Dodge engines in bullmoose cranes, and some Slant-sixes in Massey Ferguson tractors and Bombardier snow coaches.

 

Craig

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I've seen many emergency generators powered by automotive engines.  Kohler used Ford engines and then transitioned to GM 5.0 and 4.3 engines....which one depends on the kW output of the generator.

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Working in the Chrysler parts department we had calls for parts for the Dodge Quewe 251cu in six cylinder side valve engines used in aircraft tow motors and airport luggage trains, wood chippers, forklifts, cement mixers as well as many of the applications already mentioned. These were often owned by Government or semi-Government agencies. Gardener diesels were also used in rail cars and marine applications as well as trucks.

Just my two bobs worth

Rodney 😀😀😀😀😀😀

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For years Smith Air Compressors used the Ford V8 engines with one of the heads changed to 

a compression generator.  The used the 289 and 302 and had a warehouse full of take off heads.

When I Rebuilt our 65 Mustang 289, I bought new heads from them for less than $50.00 a piece.

That was in the late 80's, saved a fortune and had all brand new stuff.

 

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Oldsmobile did a sizable business with marine and industrial engines. Mostly 455 but I've heard of 350 use too. The factory-supplied ones were great- no emissions garbage on them and they got the good heads and carburetors.

 

Tobacco farmers here wore out a lot of Olds and Buick 455s watering their crops. Run 'em wide open for days on end irrigating tobacco fields, then when they quit head to the junkyard for another one.

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6 hours ago, rodneybeauchamp said:

Working in the Chrysler parts department we had calls for parts for the Dodge Quewe 251cu in six cylinder side valve engines used in aircraft tow motors and airport luggage trains, wood chippers, forklifts, cement mixers as well as many of the applications already mentioned. These were often owned by Government or semi-Government agencies. Gardener diesels were also used in rail cars and marine applications as well as trucks.

Just my two bobs worth

Rodney 😀😀😀😀😀😀

Quewe?  That should be Kew which was where British Dodge trucks were assembled in London.

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5 hours ago, dictator27 said:

Quewe?  That should be Kew which was where British Dodge trucks were assembled in London.


yes, your right! I never knew the spelling and winged it knowing it would not be Cue, Queue or Quew.

Thanks for correcting that one! 😀😀😀😀😀

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