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Which make in 1930's had downdraft carb, hydraulic brakes, etc


maok
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  • maok changed the title to Which make in 1930's had downdraft carb, hydraulic brakes, etc

The torque tube depended on design choice, but this list was common construction by the end of the 30's.  Even the slow kid in the class, Ford, had hydraulic brakes by then.  Mopar was an early practitioner, yes, but not alone.

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34 LaSalle had all of that, might be the earliest GM car to have it all? Caddy took another year or two to get the hyd brakes.

 

Mopar had all of that at least as far back as 28 Plymouth model Q

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Chrysler products experimented with Hydraulic Brakes in 1929 -- about half of the '29s were Hydraulic, and in 1930, All of them had Hydraulic Brakes...

G M started in the mid to later 1930s.

Ford started -- and was 100% -- in 1939....

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Buick had juice brakes starting in 1936, but kept the Torque Tube through the 1960 model year, changing to the exposed U-joint driveshaft for the 1961 model year.

This was the first time since 1907 for Buick not to use a Torque Tube.

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2 hours ago, mobileparts said:

Chrysler products experimented with Hydraulic Brakes in 1929 -- about half of the '29s were Hydraulic, and in 1930, All of them had Hydraulic Brakes...

G M started in the mid to later 1930s.

Ford started -- and was 100% -- in 1939....

 Chrysler had 4 wheel Hydraulic Brakes from the get go in 1924 and never looked back.

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I’m guessing the person asking the question thinks mechanical brakes aren’t adequate? Actually, none of the list of items is particularly an issue, except a torque tube is a little bit more work to do a clutch, but not much. There are many early 30’s cars with updraft carbs that perform very well...........interestingly, if you have a car with everything on the list.......It’s probably a small series car with a few exceptions. 

Edited by Joe West (see edit history)
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7 minutes ago, edinmass said:

I’m guessing the person asking the question thinks mechanical breaks aren’t adequate? Actually, none of the list of items is particularly an issue, except a torque tube is a little bit more work to do a clutch, but not much. There are many early 30’s cars with updraft carbs that perform very well...........interestingly, if you have a car with everything on the list.......It’s probably a small series car with a few exceptions. 

Ed, I don't see that in the original post at all.

 

As for mechanical brakes (note spelling), Pierce kept them through the end in 1938:  1933-35 had the Stewart-Warner inertial power assist also used by R-R as a supplemental system into the 1950s, then vacuum power assist 1936-38.  The Pierce brakes were huge--342 sq in of swept area, which was about 40% more than those of Cadillac V-16 mechanical brakes (thru 1936).  Mech brakes require more frequent adjustments, it seems, and don't do the final stop as crisply as hydraulic brakes.  Remember that even hydraulic brakes were, by and large, not self-adjusting until well after WW2.  A local newspaper feature writer was doing an article on my 1934 Pierce and questioned the efficacy of mechanical brakes, so I told him to brace himself at 40 mph on a 5% downgrade.  In the article he said he questioned mech brakes' capability, but the owner quickly diasabused him of that notion.

 

I greatly prefer downdraft carbs for easier cold starts and other reasons.

 

But to me, the most important technological advancement of the 1930s was independent front suspension (which Pierce never adopted, BTW), which essentially meant that a long wheelbase was no longer needed to obtain a smooth, easily controlled ride on the highway.

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3 hours ago, edinmass said:

I’m guessing the person asking the question thinks mechanical breaks aren’t adequate? Actually, none of the list of items is particularly an issue, except a torque tube is a little bit more work to do a clutch, but not much. There are many early 30’s cars with updraft carbs that perform very well...........interestingly, if you have a car with everything on the list.......It’s probably a small series car with a few exceptions. 

 

I wasn't thinking 'not adequate' Ed, just the effort to make them work correctly and on a regular basis. Though, I have never had a vehicle with mechanical brakes, only have heard 'stories'. Like most, if not all here, I am familiar with hydraulic braking systems.

 

I'm on the hunt for another vehicle, my preference years of styling is 1930 to 1937-8, after that, IMHO, most manufacturers lost the plot in regards to styling, though, I'm sure there are some exceptions.

 

I have seen a wonderfully restored 1934 Nash Ambassador and a beautifully styled 1930 Buick tourer but both do not have the mechanical features I have on my 'must have' list.

 

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I’ll admit to have driven just about everything.............I have never driven a perfect car. Pre war cars are about an era and a feel. Some are easy to own, others not so much. I do have a few favorites...........and recently a friend from twenty years ago got back into the hobby. He asked my opinion of what he should buy. I listened to his comments, and made a recommendation. He bought the car two weeks ago, and it arrived on Wednesday. He is thrilled...........and he was already a sophisticated collector of other items. I warned him not to buy a turd, and it would take time. He did take his time, and found the perfect car in condition, year, body style, and price. If your set goals and work towards them, you always end up successful. 

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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8 hours ago, F&J said:

34 LaSalle had all of that, might be the earliest GM car to have it all? Caddy took another year or two to get the hyd brakes.

 

Mopar had all of that at least as far back as 28 Plymouth model Q

The 1934 LaSalle had all that because it shared the chassis and powertrain with the 1934 Oldsmobile L-Series eight cylinder.   Its shared chassis and stellar Art Moderne design were its reprieve until 1941.  

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19 minutes ago, edinmass said:

I’ll admit to have driven just about everything.............I have never driven a perfect car. Pre war cars are about an era and a feel. Some are easy to own, others not so much. I do have a few favorites...........and recently a friend from twenty years ago got back into the hobby. He asked my opinion of what he should buy. I listened to his comments, and made a recommendation. He bought the car two weeks ago, and it arrived on Wednesday. He is thrilled...........and he was already a sophisticated collector of other items. I warned him not to buy a turd, and it would take time. He did take his time, and found the perfect car in condition, year, body style, and price. If your set goals and work towards them, you always end up successful. 

I'd be curious what he bought. 

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