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Walton 1/4" 3-Flute Extractor

 

https://www.waltontools.com/products/extract-machsc-hand.htm

 

Tap Extractor

Removal broken taps and save the threads. Walton Tap Extractors let you remove broken taps without drilling, lasers, damaged threads, scrapped parts or repair inserts. The hardened steel fingers fit in the flutes of a broken tap to back it out simple and safely. This effective method has been used since 1908.

 

https://www.globalindustrial.com/p/metalworking-tools/metalworking-threading/tap-extractors/wal-1-4-3-flute-extractor?

 

Edited by mike6024 (see edit history)
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Here are tap drills. Carbide drills to drill out the tap.

 

Tap extractors drill into a broken tap to break it up while it is still in the hole. This allows the pieces of the broken tap to be removed from the hole so that the partially threaded hole can be cleared without damaging it.

 

https://www.grainger.com/search/machining/threading/taps-internal-threading-tools/tapping-tools/tap-extractors?

 

Bright Finish Carbide Tap Extractor Sets

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I am amazed about how many useful tools are out there that I never knew existed.

 

And could have used in the past.

 

Thanks for bringing it to our attention.

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3 minutes ago, joe_padavano said:

 

Oh, hell. Now I have to get a set!

Knowing before hand, that you will never break another tap in your life after you get a set !  LOL.  Ima gonna get a set also !

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3 hours ago, 34LaSalleClubSedan said:

Does anyone know where I could buy a tool to remove a broken off tap for a 1/4 inch bolt for water jacket plate cover? The block is cast iron. Thanks, Jim

 

It depends how it broke, was it working freely or is it bound in the hole?

 

If it's not bound in the hole a tap removal tool may get it out.

 

If not..

 

Call a local tool and die shop, they either have or know of someone with a tap burner. It's a carbon electrode they insert and it will burn it out.

 

I keep carbide drill blanks in my box that I grind drill points on and they'll disintegrate the tap, messy but it works.

 

Broken taps are a real pain. Any tap under 3/8-16 with more than two flutes are better fishing sinkers. 1/4-20 and 10-24 are the two worst for fracturing.

 

Good luck to ya, I know your pain.

 

Ron

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We occasionally make convertible top irons in stainless.

 Early '30s Packard Phaeton top irons have snaps that are held in place with 10-24 screws. We have about a 50% success rate tapping 10-24 threads in 1/4" stainless without breaking the tap.  Not a job we assign to newbies.

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14 hours ago, Morgansdad said:

Knowing before hand, that you will never break another tap in your life after you get a set !  LOL.  Ima gonna get a set also !

 

Exactly!  I bought a snow blower for the first time a few years ago. So far, I've had to use it exactly once. Cheap insurance!

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Last week I broke an 8-32 tap on a stainless luggage rack cross member and had to replace the whole thing, I'll have me a set of those extractors!

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I have broken my share during door hardware installation (closers mostly- buildings not cars) and its always miserable trying to get them out. Glad to know theres a tool for that. Guess I shouldve figured eh!

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I have several tap extractors, that over time I have purchased from McMaster-Carr. As Locomobile suggests, if the tap is really stuck most of the tools don't work. Remember, the tap probably broke because you over torqued it into the hole and it jammed. I have used the tool that Mike pictures, but all I did was bend the fingers

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Those pronged tools won't work if it is stuck real tight, but they might work in some situations, apparently. Reviews:

 

Negative:

Right out of the box I was doubtful. Tools were too light and felt cheap. Two tines broke off the instant I applied even minimal force. No, I didn't over torque it. Cleaned out the shavings and applied plenty of penetrating oil before attempting removal. The tines are maybe half a centimeter long. Poor quality and cheaply made. Buy something else.

 

Positive:

These tap extractors worked very well. I purchased a used steel frame bike and the previous owner broke a tap off in an area that was extremely tight access. I applied penetrating oil over a period of a few weeks, and used the smallest tool in the kit. I didn’t have a tap handle, so I put a small pair of vise grips to use.

I gently rocked the tool back and forth and applied small pressure in reverse. The tap backed out and I was able to completely remove the broken tap. The bike frame was again usable.

 

This is a well designed, well made set of tools that work! Tool steel is tough. Broken taps are something everyone tries to avoid but are going to happen,this set gives a good start at rescue.

 

https://www.amazon.com/HSS-Broken-Extractor-Removal-Tool/dp/B07PLN1MTM

 

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6 hours ago, Restorer32 said:

We have about a 50% success rate tapping 10-24 threads in 1/4" stainless

Oy.. I would definitely cheat a bit with an oversize tap drill. 75% threads are not always imperative, especially with that material thickness. If you're not already use a good two flute tap with lots of oil. The center web of the two flute is much heavier.

 

3 hours ago, ojh said:

Last week I broke an 8-32 tap on a stainless luggage rack cross member and had to replace the whole thing, I'll have me a set of those extractors!

As I wrote above check with the local Machine shop or weld shop, they will likely have a tap burner. It's a carbon electrode connected to a variac transformer. They set the electrode on the tap and keep cranking the current up until it burns through it. An EDM machine can do it too. Taps are hard as glass and why they are so brittle. Only thing that ever worked as a removal tool for me is a carbide blank, it has to be held in a mill etc, lest it veers off to the side and spoils the piece. Working in machine shops since 1979 I've seen a good number of afternoons (and parts)  ruined with a broken tap. It's the last operation and one of the most risky.

 

Ron

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2 minutes ago, Locomobile said:

Oy.. I would definitely cheat a bit with an oversize tap drill. 75% threads are not always imperative, especially with that material thickness. If you're not already use a good two flute tap with lots of oil. The center web of the two flute is much heavier.

 

As I wrote above check with the local Machine shop or weld shop, they will likely have a tap burner. It's a carbon electrode connected to a variac transformer. They set the electrode on the tap and keep cranking the current up until it burns through it. An EDM machine can do it too. Taps are hard as glass and why they are so brittle. Only thing that ever worked as a removal tool for me is a carbide blank, it has to be held in a mill etc, lest it veers off to the side and spoils the piece. Working in machine shops since 1979 I've seen a good number of afternoons (and parts)  ruined with a broken tap. It's the last operation and one of the most risky.

 

Ron

Yes, a friend has an EDM machine, pretty amazing gizmo.

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21 hours ago, Morgansdad said:

Knowing before hand, that you will never break another tap in your life after you get a set !  LOL.  Ima gonna get a set also !

 

7 hours ago, joe_padavano said:

 

Exactly!  I bought a snow blower for the first time a few years ago. So far, I've had to use it exactly once. Cheap insurance!

 

Kind of like loaning a twenty to someone you don't like very much. Hope they disappear.

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11 hours ago, Locomobile said:

Oy.. I would definitely cheat a bit with an oversize tap drill. 75% threads are not always imperative, especially with that material thickness. If you're not already use a good two flute tap with lots of oil. The center web of the two flute is much heavier.

 

YES! I rarely  use the 75% column tap drills when doing hard material.

 

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