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Good News: Our Children Have Some Terrific Ideas for How to Get the Big Ol’ Boat Unstuck From the Suez Canal


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Good News: Our Children Have Some Terrific Ideas for How to Get the Big Ol’ Boat Unstuck From the Suez Canal

 

I love so many of these kids that I can't pick a favorite but I will say they certainly know how to use their cars.

 

Teddy, 4: “They need a crane and a rope and a ramp and a car. The car will run on the ramp and cut the rope and land on the boat with a crash. This will bump the boat back into the sea. If that doesn’t work, we could just add another car. Double force!!”

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I can't figure out why they don't have helos out there pulling containers off the ship and stacking them in the desert until the ship floats higher in the water - then just reload it, and resume the transit of the canal.

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9 hours ago, Studemax said:

I can't figure out why they don't have helos out there pulling containers off the ship and stacking them in the desert until the ship floats higher in the water - then just reload it, and resume the transit of the canal.

We had a drywall delivery truck get stuck pulling onto the job site. The heavy dot bumper at the rear was hung up on the pavement, the rear wheels kinda floating.  Several hundred sheets on the truck. We suggested unloading, taking the weight off the bumper, then the truck could be driven out. The driver refused to do so, saying he wasnt going to move the drywall 2 and 3 times (all he had to do was unload on the drive with his boom!). He instead called a heavy truck tow company. He got stuck about 7am, it was almost 5 pm by the time he got out and the drywall placed in the building.

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Stude, have you ever read what the maximum load for a container is? It's stenciled on the door and it's about 60,000 pounds or about 30 tons, so I don't see any helicopter unloading it.

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Well, Archimedes said:

 

Give me a lever long enough and a fulcrum on which to place it, and I shall move the world.

 

So if I channel Larry the Cable Guy correctly..........The way I figure it - if all of the Libyan fellers got a really long stick and balanced it on top of one of those pyramid things they got over there.....

Edited by JRHaelig (see edit history)
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a: M26 can lift 44,000 lbs

b: so you dam the downstream side and wait for it to float off ?

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The shear scale of this boat is off the charts...79,500 Horse Power engine, 13 football fields long, larger than an aircraft carrier, it can haul 220,940 tons, so the ship loaded must weigh around 400,000-500,000 tons? ... so it will be hard to move, it is one of those problems you never want to have.  I do agree they could come up with a better plan than this.  

 

 

 

Ever Given is one of 13 container ships built to the Imabari 20000 design developed by Imabari Shipbuilding.[4] With a length overall of 399.94 metres (1,312 ft 2 in),[3] it is one of the longest ships in service. Its hull has a beam of 58.8 metres (192 ft 11 in), a depth of 32.9 metres (107 ft 11 in), and a fully-laden draft of 14.5 metres (47 ft 7 in).[3] Ever Given has a gross tonnage of 220,940; net tonnage of 99,155; and deadweight tonnage of 199,629 tons.[3] The ship's container capacity is 20,124 TEU.[5]

Like most large container ships, the main engine is a low-speed two-stroke diesel. It is an 11-cylinder straight engine, license-manufactured MitsuiMAN B&W 11G95ME-C9. Coupled to a fixed-pitch propeller, it is rated at 59,300 kW (79,500 horsepower) at 79 rpm and gives the vessel a service speed of 22.8 knots (42.2 km/h; 26.2 mph).[4] The vessel also has four straight-8 Yanmar 8EY33LW auxiliary diesel generators.[4] For maneuvering in ports, Ever Given has two 2,500 kW (3,400 hp) bow thrusters.[4]

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Surprised they haven't brought in a boat with a high pressure dredge. They can really open up a channel.

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11 hours ago, 46 woodie said:

Stude, have you ever read what the maximum load for a container is? It's stenciled on the door and it's about 60,000 pounds or about 30 tons, so I don't see any helicopter unloading it.

 

Nope - max weight is 45,000 lbs on a collapsible container (which these are not). A Sikorsky Skycrane is rated at 42,000 lbs of lift. The Russians make an even bigger version that can lift 55,000 lbs.

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18 hours ago, padgett said:

Surprised they haven't brought in a boat with a high pressure dredge. They can really open up a channel.

 

You should try to contact the people overseeing this project to offer your input. 

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Not when they appear to want a political answer to an engineering problem.

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They must dredge all the time?  In the Mississippi river they dredge the channel every year as maintenance.

 

image.thumb.png.3a993d6d0c76bbaf4a03cf55be3702fa.png

 

I think current is the real problem, the ship is acting like a dam with a lot of pressure behind it.  With it wedged in at an angle, the more you free it the more wedged in it might get. 

 

Might be faster to dig a bypass around it.  Get a couple hundred excavators it should go fast.

 

The first time...

 

image.png.7783aca9e08fa95544fb8d5d059dfc05.png

Edited by Graham Man (see edit history)
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23 hours ago, 46 woodie said:

Stude, have you ever read what the maximum load for a container is? It's stenciled on the door and it's about 60,000 pounds or about 30 tons, so I don't see any helicopter unloading it.

Mil Mi-26 Lift TU-134

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3 hours ago, 60FlatTop said:

This guy is in Israel. I would at least ask what he thinks.

 

The operator may be based out of Israel; however, this job is being done in a Spanish speaking country.  The stop sign reads "Pare" which in many Spanish speaking countries means "Stop".  The language being spoken by spectators in the background is Spanish.

 

Judging by his many false starts and misjudgment of the geometry of the operation, the operator has not performed the "tractor lift" maneuver too many times before.  I do, however, rate the operator A+ for effort, perseverance and courage to "give it a try".

 

Cheers,

Grog

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The helicopter that is lifting the jet, is the Russian Mi-26, the heaviest lift rated helicopter in the world, rated at 44,000 max lift. The jet was stripped of it's engine, wing extensions, rear wings and it's interior to facilitate removal from the site. Stude, not to start a pissing contest, but I just got back from the body shop I frequent. Next to it is a container that has the following stenciled in big letters on the door, Max Gr. 30,400KGS, 67,200LBS. I don't know anything about containers and if this container is the same type as the ones on the ship but thats a lot of weight on that ship. It's hard to believe that it stay's afloat.

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That is the max, few containers are that loaded (friend uses several as garages, are cheap here). Single cars are often in a containerAlso would expect to be loaded with heaviest that bottom center and lightest to be in top. Manifest should show the exact weight of each container but also can be 20 ft (lighter) and 40 ft (heaviest).

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3 hours ago, HarryLime said:

xfsla087mtp61.jpg?width=1024&auto=webp&s=5636ab99c1b2df1506bfabb1449ee7799f93ed63

 

That's a great image; however, the Great Pyramids of Giza are about 85 miles from the closest artificial cut of the Suez Canal.  I also strongly suspect that sailing vessels would not be allowed within the canal unless under auxiliary power and following approved traffic separation schemes.

 

Cheers,

Grog

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3 hours ago, HarryLime said:

xfsla087mtp61.jpg?width=1024&auto=webp&s=5636ab99c1b2df1506bfabb1449ee7799f93ed63

Had noticed not as much shipping container traffic out on the four-lane road this week. It's all stuck in a pyramid!😺 How is Wallyworld gonna survive?!

 

And with that...

 

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Used to have a giant hill of beer cans near the Sebring race track.

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Likely the people with certifications allowing them to do the job finally subcontracted a non-certified person who knew how to do the job. That's how engineering works. Sometime in September the subcontractor should get paid.

 

Same story, different date.

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