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A QUICK QUESTION


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On the cars with a divided windshield there is a rubber seal between the glass panes.  When my Dad got the car this seal was nowhere to be found.  I'm hoping someone can give me the correct information as to the placement of the rubber strip.  Does it go on the bottom of the upper pane?  Or does it go on the top side of the bottom pane.  Since the top pane can swing in or out at the bottom, should the protruding lip on the seal be on the inside or the outside of which pane?  I can see several ways that this can be installed.  I would like to do it the way that the factory did it back in 1915.  The photo shows the seal configuration.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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The way I am used to seeing the rubber divider strip is attached to the bottom pane, lip inside.  Here is a photo of my 1915, I also ran the rubber under the nickeled caps on the ends to secure everything.  Good luck, Gary

 

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Gary is correct. It is the same as on my 1925s. 

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The rubber caps on the ends are avilable from BOB'S. Originally the partition strip and the caps were one piece. For my 1925 Master it is part # 170445. The gasket between the cowl and lower windshield frame was also one piece with the stancheon post pads. Now seperate items from BOB'S.

 Your windshield mounting is different mounting though.

 

Edited by dibarlaw
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How mine is installed is with the U channel on the lower glass and the single lip on the outside of the upper glass 

 

This permits tilting the top edge of the lower glass forward and the bottom edge rearward giving a wonderful breeze to the chest on down but protecting your face. 

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I installed mine on the bottom glass with lip on the inside so I could tilt the bottom out if I wanted and/or the top could be tilted out also.  If you put the lip on the outside, then the bottom glass becomes only stationery unless you tilt the top glass inward.  That doesn’t seem right to me.

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Bob and I are saying the same thing.

 

When its raining, I have both halves shut tight.  I'm already wet because I had to put the top up in the rain.  And I'm wishing I had a heater and side curtains. 

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Not a Buick but I suspect windshield might work the same way.  To open for ventilation, the top and bottom panels rotate clockwise as viewed from the driver's side of car; in other words the bottom edges of both panels rotate forward like a venetian blind.  The "h" shaped rubber seal between the top of the bottom panel and the bottom of the top panel is fitted to the top edge of the bottom panel with the lip (tall portion of the "h") towards the back.  This makes sense in the event of accident that the passengers have whatever protection the rubber seal strip might provide instead of striking the edge of the glass (yes, this car has been retro-fitted with modern laminate glass).   There is a handle on bottom center of the lower panel on the aft side.  There is also rubber seal along the very bottom to seal against the body, which wouldn't seal if bottom panel rotated counter-clockwise.         

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A rain story.

 

At the VMCCA Nickel Tour in Heath, Ohio a few years back it rained for 6+ days straight.  Roads closed, detours and changes made to routes, several folks just said, great to see you all but headed for home after a day or two.  On Wednesday my wife got a call that her best friends mother was in the hospital and it did not look good.  My wife headed home with the tow rig in the rain, I stayed behind.  So did the rain.  At least that's the story she gave me.  After Thursday, I threw in the (damp) towel and pointed the 1923 Buick north, in the rain for the 230 mile drive home.  With washouts, closed roads and bridges and detours it took me over 12 hours and the rain never stopped.  Pulled into a drive through of a bank that had an overhang to take a break and the teller on the intercom and I joked how long she would let me stay there before I had to open an account.  Did the same thing at a small country church with no one home.  Also at a small funeral home where they came out and looked at me and the back seat where I had the luggage covered up like maybe they where going to get some business.  I went through water over the tops of the running boards dozens of times.  When you stopped the water would run off the roof onto the hood and through the center hinge and hiss like heck on the hot manifold and steam would billow.  The Buick never stalled.  I have a pic on my phone I will find and post.

Edited by Brian_Heil (see edit history)
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I want to thank all those who have rang in on this dilemma.  It seems that there are several ways that this can be done and it comes down to a 'who's right and who's not right' solution.  The one thing that is certain is the way the body on the 1916 models was built.  The photo shows how the windshield assembly attaches to the cowl.  There is no rubber sealing strip on the bottom side of the lower glass frame.  I do not have to worry about that.  I'm going to put the rubber strip on the top side of the bottom pane and have the lip on the outside.  That way I can use the handle that is on the inside bottom of the lower frame to pull that section in toward the passenger compartment and not have to worry about that outside lip getting all mangled up.  I will post a photo of when the strip is in place.  This car is 106 years old and sadly there is no one living who was around when these cars were current and being driven daily.  Those folks have been gone for decades, and I mean decades.  This leaves using some common sense  and trying to figure out what just might work.  Thanks again for the insight.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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WELL DOG MY CATS!  It looks like I opened my mouth and inserted the foot clear up to the knee.  There is a narrow groove on the very bottom of the lower glass frame and according to the Restoration Supply Catalog there is a 'T-shaped' strip that goes into this groove and forms the seal for the bottom of the lower frame to the windshield assembly body (for the lack of a better word).  That will go on the list to order.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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I wish I asked my grandmother more about cars. She was born in 1901 and talked about these old cars all the time, she said the first cars in her town (Durango Colorado) were Oldsmobiles. She talked about how they heated the cars with big soapstones they heated in the fireplace. She talked about the mud ruts in the road and when people got stuck they pulled them out with horses. She knew EVERYTHING about horses, which we know almost nothing about today. She lived until 1996. The only thing she didn't tell me was which way the rubber strip on the windshields went.

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No dogs to cat on the 1923.  There is a straight edge that comes up from the cowl to the windshield bottom frame.  A modern bulb cross section trunk seal fits right on this half inch high straight edge and seals great to the bottom of the frame.  Cost me $2 at the bone yard. 

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Brian,

 

Thanks for the photos.  If you look at the photo of my windshield you will see that I have an entirely different setup.  I think Restoration Supply has just what I need for this.  They tell me that this rubber strip is trimmed to the height needed for each windshield.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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Terry:

 The T shaped seal is the same for Model T Ford and comes in several sizes for the root to fit the groove and the height to seal against the cowl. Check with Syders, Longs etc as they were cheaper than Resto Supply. Resto has their root at 9/32". You will see what is appropriate for your car the 3/4" or 1" height.

The sides of my 1925 Master take the same T strip on the sides of the upper/moveable windshield frame. Strange that my Standard does not have the same groove. Thanks to Tom Black who bestowed a bag of left over rubber seals to me. There was just enough to do my car.

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