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1941 Buick Jack


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I am trying to learn about my "new" Buick so I will have questions from time-to-time and I appreciate all the help I have received so far.  As my familiarity with this site increases, I hope to get those questions where they belong.  In the mean time, please bear with me.  In the Owner's Manual of my car, someone wrote to be sure and check the jack instructions.  I did and saw a jack I am not at all familiar with nor can I find anything out about it on the web.  The jack appears to hook directly under the top of the rim on the outside of the wheel for jacking with another piece put behind the wheel when the car is jacked up.  What is the deal with that jack?  The jack in my car is a regular bumper jack.  Is it O.K. to use that jack?  Again, thanks for all the help.

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If you feel that you need a jack just in case, get a small, lightweight modern floor jack and carry that with you. Don't try to use any bumper jacks and definitely not that rim jack that came with the '41s. That's just risking your life for no reason.

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Ditto on everything said above. AAA and the small bottle jack are your best bet. It is nice to have the original jack kit for display.

 

Every owner’s manual had the inscription on the inside cover. That was done by the publisher to get your attention. There were two versions that appeared in the manuals of which there were at least 7 editions. The one you have likely directs you to page 60. The instructions actually begin on page 59. They corrected this in the 7th edition and put two inscriptions on the inside cover. They read: “Suggest you read short wave radio information page 97. For “use of jack” see page 59.”

WWII was going on in Europe and people here were interested in hearing about it directly so the short wave radio option was added. This is a very difficult radio to find today since relatively few were ordered. 

 

I have only one 1942 manual. By that time they managed to begin the jacking information on one page, 60. Also the short wave radio was no longer mentioned. Instead they offered two different radios that were AM broadcast band only. The radio for models 40, 60, and 90 had the faceplate at the bottom of the radio and the radio was in the same position as for 1941. In the 50 and 70 the radio has the faceplate at the top and they project from the top of the center chrome grill rather than the bottom.

 

I know, too much information; but, I was into radios before cars.

Ken, KE1RI

 

 

 

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Roadmaster 71,  Do you repair car radios?  Mine isn't working and eventually I will remove it to have it fixed when I find someone who can fix it.  I had a guy in the Chevrolet club fix a radio for me but it didn't work when I got it back so I want to stay away from him.  Thanks. Stuart

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Roadmaster 71,    I checked my owners manual yesterday and yes, I have the one with the jack notation to read page 60.  It is the Fourth Edition.  Did Buick ever acknowledge the problem with that jack?  Just curious.  Stuart

 

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Stuart,

I do not know if Buick acknowledged the danger of their rim jack. I suspect it was replaced in the late 40’s but I don’t know when. I think I have a Buick manual that lists problem areas and solutions like when they changed the spark plug size and changed exhaust recirculation for some straight eights. I will check that. You raise a very interesting question. Please post here if you find out what happened.

Ken Carr, KE1RI

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Stuart: I checked the 1941 Buick Parts and Service Bulletins manual (abridged ed., Aug. 23, 1940 - Sept. 13, 1941)

I was not able to find anything about using the jack. There sure was a lot of other stuff, though:

Leaking trunk, water getting into backup lights, radio dial sticking (use white "lubriplate", not the brown stuff),

leaking air cleaner .. oil all over the place .... install shield), etc.

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Thanks.  I will have to look into getting some of the service bulletins if they, or copies of them, are available.  I had a whole three ring binder of them for my '38 Chevy and I always found them helpful.  I did get a copy of the '41 Buick Shop Manual and have gotten quite a bit of info out of it.  Also, several tips provided as a result of a couple of my posting have been very helpful.   My car had white LED bulbs for tail/stop lights and turn signals and someone recommended using red bulbs.  I bought some of those and put them in and what a difference.  You can actually see them in the daylight. 

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Stuart,

 

Great looking car. Welcome to the 1941 Buick "addiction". I have to admit I have been addicted for the 47 years I have owned my car. If you are looking for a jack, I do have the "stand" which goes on the inside and tries to hold up the brake drum from the inside. As the others have mentioned to you, if you decide to acquire a jack and it components so you have them, that would be great, but do not use it under any circumstances! If you have any questions about your car, I would be happy to help in any way I can. Richard BCA 3985, feel free to give me a call. California 805-6895978

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