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I have purchased the Vern Tardel Stromberg 97 help book.  
 
I need information about the special tools listed on page eleven (item 11 and 11A) (also item 12).  
 
What is the tool (tool # 11) called and where can I get one?  
 
What size is the socket extension (tool # 11a)? Is it a special tool or an ordinary socket extension? 
 
What size screwdriver for tool # 12? What are dimensions of the cuts in the screwdriver? 
 
Any help is greatly appreciated.  

20181129_200304.jpg

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I do not have the book, so cannot look at the pictures mentioned; however, perhaps I can guess, assuming the book is referring to the Ford version of the EE-1 produced by Stromberg USA from 1935~1938. My comments do not apply to the modern imitations, as I have no information.

 

The most unusual wrench used on the EE series carbss was the wrench for removing the main metering jets. This is a socket shaped like a double capital D (one D is backwards). Many enthusiasts refer to this tool as a "double D jet wrench".

 

Stromberg referred to this tool as a "Metering Jet Wrench". There are 3 different sizes for the various type EE carburetors, but the one associated with the Ford 97 would be Stromberg P-24924, which was later superseded by P-73606.

 

Jon.

 

 

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11 hours ago, carbking said:

Thanks Jon.  I have that tool.  The tool I am talking about is not the T-handled jet remover, but the tool described as "Main Jet Tool and socket extension." I looked at the photos, which I cannot reproduce here, to try and find a part number for the tool.  Could only come up with "09-51" or "T - 09-51".  It is displayed with what appears to be an ordinary socket extension (which is used in concert with the main tool).  The book does not tell the reader where this tool can be purchased.  I checked the strom page, summit, speedway, Mac's, Drakes, etc.  The tool can be replaced by doctoring a screw driver.  The book gives no dimension on the alteration to the screw driver or even what size screw driver to use.  It took me more than four years to graduate college, so please forgive my ignorance.   

 

 

 

 

11 hours ago, carbking said:

 

The most unusual wrench used on the EE series carbss was the wrench for removing the main metering jets. This is a socket shaped like a double capital D (one D is backwards). Many enthusiasts refer to this tool as a "double D jet wrench".

 

Stromberg referred to this tool as a "Metering Jet Wrench". There are 3 different sizes for the various type EE carburetors, but the one associated with the Ford 97 would be Stromberg P-24924, which was later superseded by P-73606.

 

Jon.

 

 

 

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11 hours ago, reoinwi said:

You can usually get the tools needed from the same supplier of parts.  I dont remember where I ordered mine but can try to look it up and let you know. 

Thanks Friend. 

 

 

Please see the attached photo.  I am interested in Tool # 11 and Tool # 11a. 

 

Tool # 11 --  What is tool #11 ?  Where can I get one? What is it called?  

 

Tool # 11a --  Is this an ordinary socket extension?  If so, what size?  Or is it a special extension?  

 

Tool # 12 --  What size screwdriver? What are the dimensions of the modification?  

 

Vern says that tool number 11 is "essential".  I wish he could have provided a little more detail.  

 

Any help with tool number 11 and 11a and 12 greatly appreciated.  

 

 

 

 

Vern9797.thumb.jpg.fe047089e4776dfbbf0f49d3cd94a11f.jpg

 

 

 

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7 minutes ago, carbking said:

I do not recognize the description.

 

Can you email me the picture?

 

Name - carbqueen

 

ISP - sbcglobal.net

 

I do not post it together because of the spiders.

 

Jon.

 

 

provide the full email address.  ?  carbqueensbcglobal.net is not working for me.  

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10 minutes ago, carbking said:

I do not recognize the description.

 

Can you email me the picture?

 

Name - carbqueen

 

ISP - sbcglobal.net

 

I do not post it together because of the spiders.

 

Jon.

 

 

 

Here is my email:   tony_caroline@att.net      Send me a message so I can message you back.  The way you have the address there does not work for me.  

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Hi - tool number 11 is T-24968 Grip Handle
 
I do not recognize tool 11A
 
Nor do the numbers you posted mean anything to me.
 
There is only one special tool other than the double D socket that is necessary, and that is the one required to insert/remove the power valve.
 
Call me at the office 573-392-7378 (9-12, 1-4 Mon-Tues), and I will describe to you how to make one.
 
Regards
 
Jon (carbking) Hardgrove
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OK - the picture on page 17 clears up everything! THERE IS NO MAIN JET UNDER THE ACCELERATOR PUMP!

 

The jet under the accelerator pump is generally referred to as a power valve, however Stromberg generally referred to it as an economizer valve.

 

This is the other essential tool to which I referred earlier.

 

Jon

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In the meantime:

 

Check out this link, and look at 15210 and 15211.

 

Carter carburetor tools

 

I personally use Carter 15210 on the Stromberg power valves.

 

If you will visualize the square prongs (side view of 15210) just wide enough to enter the slot of the power valve, and the center hole (bottom view of 15211) just a few thousands greater than the diameter of the plunger of the power valve, and deep enough to allow the plunger to not bottom, you will visualize the perfect tool.

 

While a similar tool may be fabricated by grinding, or even a hacksaw into the center of a standard screwdriver; it would not be nearly so functional as milling one such as in the pictures. The screwdriver has a tapered blade, which will never fit the slot of the jet correctly. This causes the soft brass jet to deform, and the slot fail. This is ONE of the reasons we include new power valves for the EE-1 in our rebuilding kits.

 

Any decent machinist can fabricate a tool with the square blade from a piece of solid rod. The other end may then have a round hole drilled perpendicular to the rod for a cross handle.

 

Jon.

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