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Evaporust as coolant or hot flush?


Ken_P
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2 hours ago, broker-len said:

has anyone had leaks develop after using evaporust  in cooling system

 

Yes.   All it did was point out that the radiator that looked like it needed to be replaced really had to be replaced.

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6 hours ago, broker-len said:

has anyone had leaks develop after using evaporust  in cooling system

Yes but it was before Evaporust.   A real horror story Thankfully it involved a common drive train.

 

1960 Edsel wagon, basic standard FoMoCo 352 FE engine. 

My good friend wanted to drive it coast to coast for a big meet. I had about 6 months to get the car ready. The Car ran well locally, but it had a lot of deferred maintenance. Oil leaks on engine. P/S leaks. Front end rebuild. Rusty cooling system, BUT NO OVERHEATING. 

Decided that it was easiest to pull the engine for access to everything.  I pulled out the freeze plugs and the block was full of "mud". I flushed it with a hose. I used a series of picks, wires, screwdrivers, magnets to clean it all out.  Installed new oil leak type gaskets and seals (Note: I did NOT pull the heads) and I put the engine back in. 

 

From the first fire up, combustion was getting into the cooling system. [boiling temp within 5 minutes of running, bubbles in radiator, instant pressurization] WTH, gotta be a head gasket! (remember I did not originally pull them)

 

Replaced the head gaskets 3 times and used TWO SETS of different reconditioned heads and the problem persisted. (fortunately FE parts are common) It had to be the block somehow. 

 

The departure date was coming up fast. All his reservations were made. <panic mode> 

 

Eventually I pulled an FE short block core out of my pile, sent it out for a quicky rebuild and put one set of the previously installed, reconditioned heads on it and put it in the car.  Problem solved. 😊 Still running well to this day. 

 

Remember the car/engine did not have an overheating problem before I started. I thought that flushing out the mud would be an improvement. Obviously The flushing and scraping opened up a "crack" somewhere, somehow.  I threw the overheating short block on the scrap metal pile (happy that Ford FE engines are common) and never had it carefully examined. 

 

But once something like this happens in your life, you become a little apprehensive about deep cleaning a block without being prepared for a complete rebuild and magnaflux exam etc. 

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23 hours ago, edinmass said:

 

Jim, thats not my experience. Maybe the heat in the system also turns it black or it doesn't settle out. Maybe someone can post photo of drained fluid after a few days. There is one member now who is running it this weekend, so I will ask him to try it. Ed

Maybe it is the heat I have only used it on one car. I put it in ran in up to temperature shut off and let it sit in the car for a few days, ran till warm again and drained. A few days later I poured off about 80% of the liquid clear. I would have though it would not have settle but that is what their website said so I let it sit and it did.

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of all the people why used Evaporust---------------did any one develop leaks        think I am going to try thrmocure   make for radiators and with the one bottle can do a 3 gallon rad   --------------BR

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If EvapoRust or Thermocure causes your radiator to leak, there was already a problem that was just a ticking bomb. It doesn't create leaks or damage anything in your cooling system. I prefer straight EvapoRust but I'll admit I have not used Thermocure--I just don't believe it can be as effective if it's diluted. It's totally safe and the only leaks it will create are those that happen because whatever rust was clogging the system has been removed.

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Agree with Matt. Evaporust only attacks iron oxide. It isn’t an acidic product that will attack solder, brass, coppper, etc. - only iron oxide. So if your radiator leaks after a flush, it’s because you dissolved rust that was “plugging the dike” as it were.

 

Tried gluing my impeller back together, thought I might as well flush cold until the new pump got here. Nope. 30 seconds to failure. Oh well...

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I viewed the piece on u tub about thrmo cure------the guy says it is concentrated so one bottle produces 3 gallons of chemical      my car has a cooling system close to 4 gallons    if I follow all the recommendations on this thread cleaning my system would cost me $ 60 bucks           I found the web sight for the company     I sent an E mail     but at this point I believe thrmo cure is the same as evaporust just more concentrated      I may be wrong    will do a bit more checking before I pull the trigger

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 5/12/2021 at 8:47 PM, edinmass said:

When it’s “all boiled down to gravy”, (sorry, I can’t help myself) it probably is going to be a radiator that was replaced with a core that was too small, and doesn’t have the correct flow rate.


Well, I owe Ed a bottle of something brown. He called it.

 

The radiator core is supposed to flow 28-32 gpm. It flows 12. I know it’s a newer core, so that sure looks like my culprit!

 

The shop said radiator looks great, except for the fact it doesn’t flow the right amount. No amount of evaporust in the world is fixing that!

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That's very common. The radiator was re-cored but they used a modern core that doesn't flow the same as the original. Sadly, the only cure is a new core. There are still original-style cores available, so make sure your radiator shop knows about them and use the right one. I had a new radiator made for the '35 Lincoln and while it was expensive, it uses a core identical to the original which is, apparently, still available.

 

I'm sure I've told the story of a '38 Packard a friend owned, which had a brand new radiator. It ran nice and cool but would lose a half-gallon of coolant during a drive and you could see it spilling out under the car while he drove. He had the same problem you do--the radiator did not flow fast enough and the water pump was cramming water in the top faster than it could flow to the bottom, so it was coming out the overflow. The solution there, rather than a new radiator, was to modify the water pump impeller to make it less aggressive. The car ran nice and cool after that with no more lost coolant. Perhaps that's worth considering.

 

Let us know your solution!

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  • 1 month later...

I have used this recipe for flushing a cooling system found in my 1936 Cadillac shop manual a number of times with great results;  Make a solution of one pound washing soda and two quarts kerosene, fill system with solution and water. Run for 30 minutes just above idling at a temp just below boiling, drain and let cool. I repeated this 3 times and then thoroughly flushed with water. you will be surprised at the gunk that flushes out and its dark color.

 

I would continue using Gano filter until it stops catching rust particles.

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