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1922 Paige Model 6-66 $22,000


John Bloom
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Hi John,

 

I have the same car in a 4/5-passenger phaeton called "Larchmont II" (vs. this 7-passenger "Lakewood").  Photos of mine attached.  131" wheelbase, Continental 8A engine (L-head six), 3.75 x 5.  2-wheel brakes.  Mine was $2245 new, 7-p probably $100 more, but the limo was $3350.  Good cars but with short gears as normal for the period (about 4.55 to 4.75), so expect a 35-38 mph cruising speed stock.  I have a Mitchell 26% overdrive on the shelf which seems to be an easy installation, and which vastly improved the manners of my 1925 Pierce 80 sedan with 4.88s to a 48 mph cruise.  I don't want to go fast as much as to avoid pushing the engine to high revs.

 

This one:  It's good that it was an AACA winner 55 yrs ago, but the standards were VERY different then.  From the photos, it looks like the rear seats and jump seats are done in the hides of the endangered Nauga species, which are found only in the DuPont forest.  Correct headlights except they've chromed the whole things--look at mine.

 

I'd say you'd have to go thru the fuel system (Rayfield Model G carb, vacuum tank), and of course drop the pan and ensure the water pump and valves aren't frozen.

 

Major vulnerability is the fiber timing gear for camshaft (no chain, 4 gears mesh) which was made of silk and resin.  Mine was replaced by previous owner with an aluminum gear, a tad noisy on startup is a welcome tell.  Second stock vulnerability is that the water pump holds its shaft (30" long) captive.  To remove water pump--unless it's been modified like mine NOW has-- you must remove hood, headlights, radiator and shell, fan, pulley, timing cover, then one timing gear, distributor, external oil pump, and generator--only THEN do you pull hoses and 3 nuts.  I now have a new short shaft with a coupler so the next poor fish doesn't have to go thru what I did.  Need photos of both sides of the engine to see if this has been done already.

 

AND I call this overpriced for a non-runner, but probably $15-17k might be ok.

 

Feel free to PM me if you're interested in the car.  I have some literature and the owner's manual which has a lot on mechanical adjustments, and I'd be happy to tell you some other things to look for.

 

These photos of my car make it look better than it is.  I've had it 20 years.

Paige-1.JPG

Paige-interior.JPG

Paige-rearqtr.JPG

Paige-tonneau.JPG

Edited by Grimy
correct typos (see edit history)
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Grimy, 

 

Your Larchmont II is a handsome car.  Color is such a visual impact and that black looks very nice on your Paige.  I also like the proportions of yours better.  I'll have to take your word that your photos are more flattering than in person, but your car needs no apologies!  very nice.  

It is probably good that this car is 700 miles from me, or I might go look at it.  I have just undertaken a project and don't want to get distracted at this point.  If the timing was different, i'd go look and see exactly what this car has to offer.  

The complexities of the water pump and shaft are good to know.  I worry about these type of issues, and I don't have the experience that others have taking on "surprises like this".  Your comments about speed and gearing are about what I would expect from this era.  It looks like it would be a lot of fun in the country roads of Indiana at 35 mph.....  I need to turn my eyes away from this project.

 

Growing up, we didn't know there was any world outside of the Dupont Forest.  By my early 20's, I could skin a Nauga in the field, and get every last square inch of premium hide.  One day we went to the edge of the forest and saw a pasture.  there were some large Bovine looking things grazing about.  Can't imagine any use for those beasts.....

 

There is some complex diagram I'm sure that relates Free Time, Finances, Your Age and the reality of taking on cars needing work.  I probably need to just watch this one from a distance, but it looks interesting.  I'll be keeping an eye out for Paige related content.  This car and yours has opened my eyes to them. 

 

 

 

 

 

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John, I bought mine in SF 20 years ago from a friend because I didn't want it to go to a street rod owner, and grew to love it.  Paige was an assembled car (I no longer consider that automatically a slur), but their components are very high quality.  The Larchmont bodies, at very least, were made by Wilson of Detroit, which also did some series-custom coupes for Pierce-Arrow (and other makers) a few years later.

 

I should mention that the condition of the vee-ed radiator with herringbone fins is exceptionally important, as it would cost as much as the car to re-make.

 

This car was refurbished (I wouldn't say "restored) in Iowa in the early 1970s, and a friend found two photo prints of it in the same condition with 1973 dates at the Bakersfield HCCA swap meet in 2018.

 

I know all too well the diagram you mention (Venn Diagram with overlapping and tangent circles?) and have been its victim a few times.

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On 3/23/2021 at 10:08 AM, Grimy said:

John, I bought mine in SF 20 years ago from a friend because I didn't want it to go to a street rod owner, and grew to love it.  Paige was an assembled car (I no longer consider that automatically a slur), but their components are very high quality.  The Larchmont bodies, at very least, were made by Wilson of Detroit, which also did some series-custom coupes for Pierce-Arrow (and other makers) a few years later.

 

I should mention that the condition of the vee-ed radiator with herringbone fins is exceptionally important, as it would cost as much as the car to re-make.

 

This car was refurbished (I wouldn't say "restored) in Iowa in the early 1970s, and a friend found two photo prints of it in the same condition with 1973 dates at the Bakersfield HCCA swap meet in 2018.

 

I know all too well the diagram you mention (Venn Diagram with overlapping and tangent circles?) and have been its victim a few times.

 

On 3/23/2021 at 11:25 AM, HarryLime said:

Grimy , Thank you for the info and pictures of your beautiful auto . Having owned a Paige , I am a great fan .

Harry and Grimy, what would you say the "competition" was for Paige in the early 20's?  Fairly large wheelbase and Displacement......Custom bodies ....?

 

Would they have been comparable to a Big Six Studebaker?  More high end than that?

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33 minutes ago, John Bloom said:

Would they have been comparable to a Big Six Studebaker?  More high end than that?

Big Six Studebaker would probably be a strong competitor.  The Paige Big Six (this one) was 331 cid (3.75 x 5) for 70 hp with 131" wb vs. Stude's 354 cid for 75 hp (at the end of the run) and 127" wb.  I don't know the open and closed prices for Studebaker, but the 1922 6-66 Paige prices were (from Bill Roberts's website):

  • Touring, 7-Passenger, Lakewood, $2,195
  • Sport Type, Larchmont II, $2,245
  • Roadster, 3-Passenger, Daytona, $2,495
  • Coupé, 5-Passenger, $3,100
  • Sedan, 7-Passenger, $3,155
  • Limousine, 7-Passenger, $3,350

(At the time, closed car prices were much higher than open car prices.  I've read somewhere that in 1919, 90% of cars sold in the U.S. were open and by 1929 only 10% were open.)

 

I'd have to spend some quality time with the Standard Catalog to give you more possibilities, but the more I think about it, the more I agree with you.

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v8For context, the 1922 Studebaker Big Six EK Models 126" wb were 7 passenger touring $1,985; 7 passenger sedan $2,950.   By four years later Model EP the 7passenger Duplex Phaeton $1,795; 7 passenger sedan $2,245.  Wheelbases were 120" & 127" with a wider selection of body styles, priced from $1,795 to $2,325.

 

The Packard Single Six 126, 268.4 ci, 126" wb, five passenger touring $2,485, sedan $2,750; the Model 133, 133" wb 7 passenger touring $2,685, sedan $3,525.  Those prices would moderate by the 1925-'26 326 and 333 models, particularly the sedans which reached parity with open cars causing the sales to burgeon.

 

Added this later when I had time to research the other competitors.

1922 Roamer 6-54E, 303 ci, 128" wb 5 passenger touring $2,485; 7 passenger touring $2,750.

1922 Jordan Model F, 303 ci, 127" wb, 7 passenger touring $2,475

1922 Cole Aeroeight V8, 346 ci, 127" wb, 7 passenger touring $2,485

Edited by 58L-Y8
more competitor context (see edit history)
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