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We have a few cars :) Some are SAE and some are Metric. I seem too often grab the wrong size socket. Just got a set of Metrinch.

Each wrench and socket will work on SAE OR  Metric (even rounded off) bolts. Becoming my go-to toolbox!

https://www.amazon.com/Metrinch-Combo-Spanner-Socket-Wrench/dp/B000WR3JUO/ref=asc_df_B000WR3JUO/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=309813767497&hvpos=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=7756132433841522820&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9010804&hvtargid=pla-568899462894&psc=1

Youtube Metrinch Review

Edited by CatBird (see edit history)
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Some are real close (19mm=3/4") but many are not.  Most commonality is in lug nuts and 6 point has a lot of tolerance. I also have Whitworth.

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For me it's easier to have one roll around pair for SAE and another for "other".

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Besides 3/4 - 19mm, 13/16 is close to 21mm, 5/8 & 16mm, & a 9/16 might turn a 14mm. As mentioned even a 6 point is only useful for lug nuts.

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These have been around since 1993. A Cadillac friend has been using them since 1995. I used his tool set and am surprised by the quality.  $200 is not cheap, and I tend to cheap, except when buying cars!

The company has longevity. I bought these on Amazon for their outstanding return policy. Free shipping back to the seller.  I am very happy with these tools, and I think that you will do the same. Don't let your preconceptions deter you. They work!

Suggest that you read the attached Amazon ad and read the reviews. The tools have a very different opening shape. They easily fit SAE and Metric. I have been using them on a variety of nuts and bolts, and they work beautifully! 

 

See the Youtube review.
Metrinch Review

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The metrinch sockets have a curved face between each pair of internal 'points'. This puts the turning force pressure further away from the corners of the nut, and allows small variations in nut sizes to be accomodated. They also have less tendency to mark the nuts. Personally, I only seem to use them for Whitworth, but that's just my habit, I guess. Old dog, new tricks. I bought them when my hex drive Whitworth set was stolen.

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Home is here.

    3/8” Sockets:
    10 mm - 3/8”
    11 mm - 7/16”
    12 mm - 15/32”
    13 mm - 1/2”
    14 mm - 9/16”
    16 mm - 5/8”
    17 mm - 11/16”
    19 mm - 3/4”

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On 3/21/2021 at 5:34 AM, Bush Mechanic said:

The metrinch sockets have a curved face between each pair of internal 'points'. This puts the turning force pressure further away from the corners of the nut, and allows small variations in nut sizes to be accomodated. They also have less tendency to mark the nuts. Personally, I only seem to use them for Whitworth, but that's just my habit, I guess. Old dog, new tricks. I bought them when my hex drive Whitworth set was stolen.

Thanks, Bush. Appreciate that you understand these wrenches. They are NOT a sloppy fit nor gimmick for SAE and Metric. Quality tools IMHO.

Interesting they fit Whitworth. I had a 1954 Vincent Black Shadow motorcycle "Belch Fire V twin" it had Whitworth. I have classic cars from 1903 to 1960 and a few 2016 for daily drivers. These wrenches fit everything and are having my goto box when touring.

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As a machinist that routinely works in thousandths and ten thousandths at the grinder, there is no such thing as a wrench that fits both, they're clearly two. There is not one metric or fractional nominal size that are equal to the other. It's going to be tight on one and loose on the other.

 

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Agree, the right tool for the right job or might as well use a monkey wrench.

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That's a crescent wrench, monkey wrench fits big stuff.

licensed-image?q=tbn:ANd9GcQ5UjVuiVugj8q

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On 3/21/2021 at 7:20 AM, padgett said:

Home is here.

    3/8” Sockets:
    10 mm - 3/8”
    11 mm - 7/16”
    12 mm - 15/32”
    13 mm - 1/2”
    14 mm - 9/16”
    16 mm - 5/8”
    17 mm - 11/16”
    19 mm - 3/4”

 

I cannot agree, close possibly on some sizes but I have found that a 10 needs a 10, neither a 3/8 nor a 7/16 will work.

I was in the dark the other day and grabbed an 11 and it fit the 7/16 that I was working with. Half is close to 13 but only fits sometimes.

In a pinch maybe, but a real mechanic will have both plus a couple of others if needed. I bought a set of Whitworth some yeas ago that see very little use.

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+1 agree, table was from metrinch. 3/8 is almost exactly 1/2 way from 9mm to 10mm. Would need a 9.5mm.

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1 hour ago, padgett said:

That's a crescent wrench, monkey wrench fits big stuff.

 

Then you should show a picture of a Monkey Wrench!🤬

 

That is a Stillson Wrench (aka Pipe Wrench)!

 

Google has it confused also, with picture like Padgett shows when looking up Monkey wrench, and pictures of Monkey Wrenches when looking up Stillson wrench....  at least they are labeled Monkey Wrench.... What is wrong with young people who program?

 

A Monkey Wrench has parallel smooth jaws for use on fasteners with flats. A pipe (Stillson) has curved jaws with teeth to grab the smooth pipe or fittings with the flats worn off (like from using a pipe wrench!). 

 

Figure 157 is a Monkey Wrench. Figure 158 is a Stillson Wrench.

 

 

375px-Monkey_and_Stillson_wrenches.png

Edited by Frank DuVal (see edit history)
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We have had a set of metrinch sockets for a long time now they work well. I tend to use my other correct size sockets but the metrinch or single hex sockets tend to work better when dealing with chewed around nuts or bolts. They definitely were not a cheap item when Dad purchased them year’s ago, as I remember being a teenager at the time and getting a lecture about not loosing any. 

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Have one with smooth sides. Does not work well on anything. And then there is a coach wrench.

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There is a fascinating compilation about Metrinch. One side thinks they will not, cannot, work as well as a particular socket designed for a particular bolt. As best I can tell this side has not used Metrinch and is extrapolating from previous concepts.

Others have used Metrinch and see how well they work. I have a set and are very pleased with how well they work. 

I appreciate both opinions.

However I am going for a ride, and carrying my Metrinch and a few other tools. The weather is beautiful. 65 degrees and sunny. Good convertible weather getting on my Outback clothes. Trying to decide if I want to put on my windshield on my Thomas Flyer.

Suggest that everyone do the same! Lets enjoy some breeze. If anyone in Atlanta who would like to go for a ride, come on! Share the fun. It can hold five people, but a bit windy.

BTW I am looking for a good monocle windshield for my 1913 Marmon Speedster? 

 

1.JPEG

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