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Looking for Engine Chrysler CD8


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Which engine? 1931/32 CD-8 came in 3 different varieties depending on month of production. Early 3 X 4 1/4 Bore and Stroke 3 1/8 X 4 1/4 and the Late De Luxe 3 1/4 X 4 1/4.  Manifold, carburetor and other difference apply to each incarnation.

 

Kurt M

1931 De Luxe CD-8 owner

 

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Hope your able to find a usable engine. The block in my DeSoto CF8 is cracked in the water jacket and the oil galley.  Fortunately a member provided me with another engine. The members here are wonderful so one of them just might have what your looking for. 

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6 hours ago, hchris said:

Sadly a common fault with these engines, can't help with your problem but good chance you're going to have to weld.


Yes, with old engines everything can happen and everything has a solution

thanks 

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If you can't easily find another engine, you may want to consider having your engine repaired with metal stitching.  A search of this forum will show many threads discussing the pros and cons of welding vs. metal stitching.

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Hello Nicolas !

I did not realize how to find multiple word phrases for a long time. What you must do is put quotation marks around the phrase. Just putting   metal stitching  will not work.  “metal stitching”  gives 74 results. 
 

A little over 20 years ago I spent about a month and a half in Chile. My main purpose was my involvement with my astronomical hobby, and I brought a fairly large telescope and two friends. We had a really fantastic time visiting research observatories,  meeting Chilean amateur and professional astronomers, and exploring the whole arid Chilean coast in a rented car. It was a real trip of a lifetime. Poor health in my old age would make this totally impossible now.

 

The driving for me was exceptional. The sterile, lifeless parts of the Atacama look just like some of the pictures we see from Mars. I have been having road adventures over much of Latin America beginning in 1954 , riding with my parents through  Mexico when I was ten years old. I have spent years living in, working in, and driving in our Southern neighbors. Driving in Chile was unique for me. I had been warned not to speed EVER in Chile. The consequences if caught wold be SEVERE. A foreigner could have to spend a huge amount  time and money before being allowed to leave Chile. Oncoming vehicles would flash their lights to warn of “speed traps” ahead. Well, those of you who know me, know that I drove very fast and aggressively when I was young and able. I was driving with a friend who had lived in Chile, and knew how things were very well. He had begged me not to speed, saying if I was caught, that would be the end of our vacation, and I would have an extremely unpleasant cross-cultural experience. Naturally, I got caught. An oncoming “Doppler cop” got me. My friend sternly warned me not to compound the serious trouble I was in by trying to bribe the police. That is what I usually do in such situations. I have done a lot of driving in Costa Rica. It is the only other country where I don’t dare try to bribe my way out of things. But I got  EXTREMELY LUCKY !!!!! I used my “stupid gringo” technique. It was the only hope I had. I speak Spanish fluently, and always know what the police are asking me. But if I pretend to be ignorant, speaking very limited broken Spanish with a horrible gringo accent , I can continuously confuse and frustrate my way out of trouble. This is not easy, and must not be tried by anyone who does not have rather advanced proficiency with the Spanish language, and a sophisticated level of cultural awareness. Sadly, this technique would not work for you. Neither would it work for a gringo who actually IS stupid. “Stupid gringo “ is a GREAT ACT ! A good game if you play it right. As I said, I got lucky again that time. I only wish I could try it at home 😉.

 

Nicolas, where in Chile do you live ? I wonder how and where you guys move your fast cars at speed. Doing what I did could not have worked forever . Eventually, somewhere, I suppose I could have been pulled over by a cop who spoke English well. Mucho miedo.           -      Carl,     (El Cadillaquero)

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21 minutes ago, C Carl said:

Hello Nicolas !

I did not realize how to find multiple word phrases for a long time. What you must do is put quotation marks around the phrase. Just putting   metal stitching  will not work.  “metal stitching”  gives 74 results. 
 

A little over 20 years ago I spent about a month and a half in Chile. My main purpose was my involvement with my astronomical hobby, and I brought a fairly large telescope and two friends. We had a really fantastic time visiting research observatories,  meeting Chilean amateur and professional astronomers, and exploring the whole arid Chilean coast in a rented car. It was a real trip of a lifetime. Poor health in my old age would make this totally impossible now.

 

The driving for me was exceptional. The sterile, lifeless parts of the Atacama look just like some of the pictures we see from Mars. I have been having road adventures over much of Latin America beginning in 1954 , riding with my parents through  Mexico when I was ten years old. I have spent years living in, working in, and driving in our Southern neighbors. Driving in Chile was unique for me. I had been warned not to speed EVER in Chile. The consequences if caught wold be SEVERE. A foreigner could have to spend a huge amount  time and money before being allowed to leave Chile. Oncoming vehicles would flash their lights to warn of “speed traps” ahead. Well, those of you who know me, know that I drove very fast and aggressively when I was young and able. I was driving with a friend who had lived in Chile, and knew how things were very well. He had begged me not to speed, saying if I was caught, that would be the end of our vacation, and I would have an extremely unpleasant cross-cultural experience. Naturally, I got caught. An oncoming “Doppler cop” got me. My friend sternly warned me not to compound the serious trouble I was in by trying to bribe the police. That is what I usually do in such situations. I have done a lot of driving in Costa Rica. It is the only other country where I don’t dare try to bribe my way out of things. But I got  EXTREMELY LUCKY !!!!! I used my “stupid gringo” technique. It was the only hope I had. I speak Spanish fluently, and always know what the police are asking me. But if I pretend to be ignorant, speaking very limited broken Spanish with a horrible gringo accent , I can continuously confuse and frustrate my way out of trouble. This is not easy, and must not be tried by anyone who does not have rather advanced proficiency with the Spanish language, and a sophisticated level of cultural awareness. Sadly, this technique would not work for you. Neither would it work for a gringo who actually IS stupid. “Stupid gringo “ is a GREAT ACT ! A good game if you play it right. As I said, I got lucky again that time. I only wish I could try it at home 😉.

 

Nicolas, where in Chile do you live ? I wonder how and where you guys move your fast cars at speed. Doing what I did could not have worked forever . Eventually, somewhere, I suppose I could have been pulled over by a cop who spoke English well. Mucho miedo.           -      Carl,     (El Cadillaquero)

hahaha what a good story and experience you have lived in Chile.  Today waze is used and the police enjoy great prestige because no one can corrupt our "" carabineros ". Not like in other Latin American countries where everything is solved with a ticket and is part of the monthly salary of a policeman.  Today there are very fast highways linking the country very efficiently.  All thanks to the private sector.  Living and enjoying the landscapes of Chile in an old car is a tremendous experience of complete freedom! Thanks you for your post! 

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