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American Bosch Wiper Motor


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1. Can anyone tell me over what span of years (or decades) the American Bosch (Springfield, Mass) wiper motor was in use in production vehicles? This particular one is model WWA6A.

 

and

 

2. What type of wiper arm fits the American Bosch shaft?  1/4" diameter shaft followed by a serrated taper followed by a #10-32 thread.

 

Currently fitted to a 1928 Springfield Rolls-Royce, although it is not the original motor for the car.

 

Thanks.

Amer Bosch unit.jpg

motor shaft.jpg

motor.jpg

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Since both Rolls and Bosch were in Springfield, it could actually be a factory replacment done back in the day. Your P1 windshield looks more like a Murphy casting rather than Brewster....what body style do you have?

 

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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Ed, you're pretty good to discern a Murphy windshield from all the more than was shown in the photo. 1928 Springfield Phantom I, S129RP, Murphy Allweather. Correct motor is likely the Stromberg Model C, photo attached.  Most since disintegrated due to lousy white metal housings, the survivors finding their way to Model J Duesenbergs, which used far more Murphy bodies than ever fitted to R-R.  So, until a Stromberg Model C comes along, would like to fit an era-appropriate wiper arm and blade to the Bosch.  I just don't know what that arm looks like - not the hook and saddle common to the era (as use by Trico) nor the clamp on type as used by Anco.

Stromberg Model C ebay.jpg

S129RP Murphy Allweather MacDonald front.jpg

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“Ed, your pretty good.....”

 

Thanks, and I’m not just another handsome face and charming personality! Most of the guys here think I’m like petroleum.........crude and unrefined!🤫

 

I might have what you need, I’ll look in the next day or two. Take offs from a past project. 
 

 

PS- I was born and raised in Springfield........so I guess I turned out ok. I worked with the factory employees back when I was just a kid. Your car looks familiar to me........I probably worked on it. Too many cars and years to remember clearly. Where has it been the last fifty years? How long have you had it’s. Best, Ed.

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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1 hour ago, alsancle said:

What Ed said.  That looks like a Murphy body,  in which case you would need the Stromberg.

 

https://straight-eight.com/product/stromberg-wiper-motor/

 

EDIT:  You beat me to it.

 

Nice car!


The good news is they just made a bunch of new castings.........the bad news is they aren’t 1.99! 
 

 

“Nice car!”.......Yes, a Springfield P1 is arguably the best car ever built. The PII’s are junk.....🤣

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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Fortunately you have the “low end” or “standard” windshield frame with only one wiper..........for 18 grand the purchaser when new didn’t throw down for the extra accessory wiper.....which was an entire different casting for the windshield! Wonder why they were 60 times the price of a Ford of the same year? 
 

Who would have imagined a Rolls without every single option? 
 

 

 

 

93327C52-2317-4C52-A7BF-A840AF9095D0.png

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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Not to bore you with undesired detail, but you did ask:

 

S129RP delivered new to Bemb-Robinson dealership in Detroit, 1928. Primarily a Hudson-Essex dealer, but also authorized to sell R-R.  An open Murphy body perhaps an odd choice for the Detroit market in 1928, but Walter Bemb and Walter Murphy were contemporaries from Detroit, and a number of custom Hudsons done by Murphy may be the connection. Whether for personal use or a demonstrator is not known.

 

Next owner, Joseph Diens, a used car dealer in Cincinnati, 1932.  Just imagine the depreciation in those four years! Diens died the following year, and it is not known if he still had the car at that time. Then three more owners in Ohio before getting as close to you as it has ever been.  Dick Moore of Elba NY did a cosmetic restoration in the 1980s. Then Dr. John Lawrence in Pennsylvania in the early 2000s, and I became its caretaker in 2012.

 

A full engine rebuild has just been completed, and hopefully the car will be back on the road soon. By the way, the extra lamps (used for turn signals) have been removed, and the bumpers corrected since the photo was taken.

 

One of five Murphy Allweather bodies on Phantom I chassis. This one may be unique in that the landau irons are on the outside of the top (usually inside), and there is a windshield for rear seat passengers which folds into a compartment in the back of the front seat.

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2 hours ago, edinmass said:

Fortunately you have the “low end” or “standard” windshield frame with only one wiper..........for 18 grand the purchaser when new didn’t throw down for the extra accessory wiper.....which was an entire different casting for the windshield! Wonder why they were 60 times the price of a Ford of the same year? 
 

Who would have imagined a Rolls without every single option? 
 

 

 

 

93327C52-2317-4C52-A7BF-A840AF9095D0.png

I was reading recently that the average new car sales prices exceeded $40,000 for the first time in 2020. If you use the same multiple of 60, a modern Rolls Royce would have to cost approximately $2,400,000 to have the same price differential.  

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I noticed the landau bars as being unusual. There must be another one in a similar color. Your car has a very nice look. The drum headlights and round front bumper work well with the design. Taking off the lights is a good idea. The car looks much better true to form without any extras on it. From a personal perspective, I remove side mount mirrors also. Less is more on these special cars........and way too many people bolt way too much junk onto the car. Congratulations on owning such a fine automobile. Early P1’s rarely have good looks....your car certainly does. 

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Another somewhat unusual feature are the red (port) and green (starboard) jewels in the sides of the otherwise standard Haverhill  R-R cowl lamps. Perhaps Mr. Bemb intended to take the car for a spin on Lake St. Clair?

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  • 3 weeks later...

To answer my original question should someone in the future wish to know, the attached photo shows the type of wiper arm that fits the American Bosch electric wiper motor. A splined hole in the arm pivot that matches the spline on the motor shaft, and a nut to hold the two together.  In overall design and appearance, probably a decade too new for the car it's currently fitted to. This particular arm is made to fit a WWII era Dodge Power Wagon, which used the same basic motor.  But it will be functional until a correct Stromberg Model C comes along.

wiper arm and nut.jpg

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I checked my stuff in the warehouse, no Stromberg spare.......just some small leftovers from installing a new casting. They are fairly difficult to come by since the Duesenberg guys are always on the hunt for them. Maybe a better finish or a chrome cover on your current unit will hold you over till you get one. It will probably be years unless you throw money at it.........

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Many ? Most ? Everybody ? know that Straight Eight is the present , living descendant of Classic and Exotic Services. I have found that whatever money I spend with these guys really seems like a bargain in the end. You  have to factor your time into the valuation of their better than new products and expert services. Say : does anyone know if Bruce is still with them ?  Thank you,    -    Carl 

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Thank you, Ed. If that ‘24 Cad Victoria I just bought can be put back on the road without any heroics, I will send them another carb for their expert rebuilding. I agree 100% with you that all the old Cadillac Johnson carbs should be treated to very experienced rebuilding by guys who know them inside and out. With Mark now several years gone from Scottsdale, I don’t know anyone else who can do justice to the Ruben Goldberg devices. And of course, Mark’s turnaround time was getting a bit hard to bear. C&E turnaround time was lightning fast for a carb and distributor rebuild for me.   -   Carl 

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