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Need Vintage 1940s Sedan for TV Miniseries in Beaufort SC


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I need to rent a vintage 1940s sedan to use as a taxi in one episode of a television miniseries to be filmed in April in Beaufort SC. It must be running. It will be cared for. If you have one or know of one you can refer, please contact me at thomas@sapphire multimediafla.com. Thanks!

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10 minutes ago, bryankazmer said:

Good luck as this type of use is forbidden by many antique car insurance policies.

Why be negative.  Production companies can easily provide appropriate coverage for anything that is used in their work.

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It would help if you provided a little more info. 
What period is show set in early 40’s, late 40’s, early 50’s? 
How long is shoot? A day, 5 days, more?

Who drives the car? Owner, goofy actor, does he know how to drive a vintage car, manual shift? 
Compensation or just bragging rights it’s in a TV show? 
Do you plan to modify the car? Paint, taxi light? 
Where is it kept overnight?

Insurance?

Do you restore to original condition if modified? 
Lots more but you get the idea. 
 

FYI - most old cars are a passion to the owners. They just don’t care about a TV show bragging rights IF they have to give up complete control of the vehicle. A lot of time, blood, sweat, tears and money goes into these family members, yes family members, and no one wants them taken for granted as just another prop. As an example my 38 Studebaker cost about 10 grand sitting in a barn for 42 years. Rebuilt the engine, trans, brakes, suspension, electrical wiring and put new tires and windshield in it. That took hours and hours of labor and a good amount of money for parts. We buffed out the paint which again took time & money. On top of all that my two blondes (see avatar) that ride everywhere with me in the back seat love the ease they can get in and out of it. Therefore dollar wise I wouldn’t sell it for double what I have in it. Heck, I’m sure I value my labor time higher than you do a production hour of your show. 
Give a more complete description of what you are looking for and you might have better results.  
dave s 

Edited by SC38DLS (see edit history)
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ej, bryan is not being negative, he is only cautioning a fellow member that some insurance companies forbid using your car for any commercial enterprises. One of the members of our car club told the membership that his insurance company cancelled his policy because he was using his car for weddings. It has nothing to do with the production company insuring his car. In this day of litigation the injured party will sue everyone, including his insurance company and they simply don't want to get involved. Always check with your insurance carrier before getting involved in any such enterprise.

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In answer to several questions:

What period is show set in early 40’s, late 40’s, early 50’s? Based on real-life events, the miniseries is about a WWII US Navy dive-bomber hero returning home from the war to his family homestead in Charleston. Therefore, it is late 1940s. 
How long is shoot? A day, 5 days, more? One day. The main character is being picked up by a taxi at the military air terminal and drives along country roads. The cab arrives at his home, which is an inn in Beaufort, SC.

Who drives the car? Owner, goofy actor, does he know how to drive a vintage car, manual shift? Anyone. Not essential to the story, but a responsible person, not a "goofy" actor. It can be the car's owner if he/she wishes and can even be in the shot. 
Compensation or just bragging rights it’s in a TV show? A negotiated fair price.
Do you plan to modify the car? Paint, taxi light? A magnetic taxi light for the roof and a couple of magnetic signs for each front door. No modifications whatsoever.
Where is it kept overnight? A one-day shot. It can be return home same day.

Insurance? Negotiable. If it is a vintage auto rental company it may be covered.

Do you restore to original condition if modified? No modifications whatsoever. The car will be kept safe, secure and clean.

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Thomas Blitch,

I am probably not the guy you are seeking since I am in Wilmington NC, home to lots of film and TV productions, but not close enough to Beaufort SC to be of interest. I would, however, like to help you get your story a little more realistic. The vast majority of cars that would have been available to pick up a WWII veteran at the end of his enlistment would not have been a car from the 40's. Almost all of them would have been from the late 30's. Car production ended in 1942 and did not restart until after the end of the war. Your production company should probably be looking for a 1937-1941 car. Most cars used as Taxi's at the end of the war would have probably been from the late 30's.    

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a television miniseries to be filmed in April in Beaufort SC

 

Yet another series about how cruel Southerners were in the old days? If so, no thanks. Sorry to be presumptuous, but I trust the "wisdom" of television about as far as I can throw a '41 Cadillac.

 

If that isn't the case, then best wishes to your production.

Edited by JamesR (see edit history)
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MCHinson raises a good point - after WWII new cars were in short supply.  Some big city cab companies had 46-8 taxicabs (DeSoto was popular), but small town company would more likely be running a prewar car, of the low to medium price range.

 

The accuracy is perhaps more important to this board than to the film maker, but it is best to avoid the flubs we've seen, like the postwar Packard in 1945 in "Patton".

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Mr. Blitch:

To impart realism into your choice of cars to act as the taxi, a 1940-'42 DeSoto or Dodge or six cylinder Chrysler four door sedan would be the best choice.   Even a Plymouth of those years would work too.  Chrysler Corporation cars, especially DeSoto, were the choice for taxi companies as they were rugged, reliable, easy-to-repair, and ubiquitous.   As private passenger cars, they were valued for the same reason, have a fairly high survival rate now.   For that reason, fully functional, presentable examples still appear for prices well under $10K, here is an example recently for sale in your region:

    For Sale: 1948 DODGE D-24 sedan - $4,800 - Concord, NC - Not Mine - "Not Mine" Automobiles For Sale - Antique Automobile Club of America - Discussion Forums (aaca.org)

You might consider purchasing such a car for use in your film. Although this is a 1948 model, Chrysler products were visually unchanged for the three postwar years, would be the choice of a taxi company who did receive a new car during 1945-'46.    We only ask that it be treated as the 70+ year old survivor car it is, be undamaged and enjoyable for the next owner when you've finished with it.   Good luck with your research.

 

BTW: Whatever car you ultimately use as a taxi, Do not show white wall tires on it!   No taxi company equipped their cars with white wall tires!    Here is a period photo of a bus station/taxi company, the sedans are all Chrysler product cars.

'40 bus stop - '39 Plymouth lwb.jpg

Edited by 58L-Y8
Added 1940' bus station-taxi company photo (see edit history)
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Thank you for providing answers to the questions I posted. These were just examples of what most owners would want to know before even considering doing something like this. The point about post war taxis in a small town not being a 40’s car should also be taken into consideration. 
 

Someone will come along and help you out, so don’t be discouraged, keep trying on this forum, we’re really a decent group that will help if possible. Good luck with finding the right car and I hope the show is a success for you. Please let us know when it will air and on what network. 
dave s 

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16 minutes ago, 58L-Y8 said:

Mr. Blitch:

To impart realism into your choice of cars to act as the taxi, a 1940-'42 DeSoto or Dodge or six cylinder Chrysler four door sedan would be the best choice.   Even a Plymouth of those years would work too.  Chrysler Corporation cars, especially DeSoto, were the choice for taxi companies as they were rugged, reliable, easy-to-repair, and ubiquitous.   As private passenger cars, they were valued for the same reason, have a fairly high survival rate now.   For that reason, fully functional, presentable examples still appear for prices well under $10K, here is an example recently for sale in your region:

    For Sale: 1948 DODGE D-24 sedan - $4,800 - Concord, NC - Not Mine - "Not Mine" Automobiles For Sale - Antique Automobile Club of America - Discussion Forums (aaca.org)

You might consider purchasing such a car for use in your film. Although this is a 1948 model, Chrysler products were visually unchanged for the three postwar years, would be the choice of a taxi company who did receive a new car during 1945-'46.    We only ask that it be treated as the 70+ year old survivor car it is, be undamaged and enjoyable for the next owner when you've finished with it.   Good luck with your research.

 

BTW: Whatever car you ultimately use as a taxi, Do not show white wall tires on it!   No taxi company equipped their cars with white wall tires!    Here is a period photo of a bus station/taxi company, the sedans are all Chrysler product cars.

'40 bus stop - '39 Plymouth lwb.jpg

Sounds like a deal in the making for some enterprising person in the area. Person can buy this car, work out a lease with the tv production for a day or two at $1500, end up with a classic car for $3000. No brainer.

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19 hours ago, JamesR said:

 

Yet another series about how cruel Southerners were in the old days? If so, no thanks. Sorry to be presumptuous, but I trust the "wisdom" of television about as far as I can throw a '41 Cadillac.

 

If that isn't the case, then best wishes to your production.

Not even close, James. Check out "Pop's Place: Some Things Are Meant To Be" on Amazon.

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10 hours ago, TAKerry said:

Sounds like a deal in the making for some enterprising person in the area. Person can buy this car, work out a lease with the tv production for a day or two at $1500, end up with a classic car for $3000. No brainer.

 

10 hours ago, SC38DLS said:

Thank you for providing answers to the questions I posted. These were just examples of what most owners would want to know before even considering doing something like this. The point about post war taxis in a small town not being a 40’s car should also be taken into consideration. 
 

Someone will come along and help you out, so don’t be discouraged, keep trying on this forum, we’re really a decent group that will help if possible. Good luck with finding the right car and I hope the show is a success for you. Please let us know when it will air and on what network. 
dave s 

It seems to be so, Dave. I am appreciative for all the advice.

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11 hours ago, 58L-Y8 said:

Mr. Blitch:

To impart realism into your choice of cars to act as the taxi, a 1940-'42 DeSoto or Dodge or six cylinder Chrysler four door sedan would be the best choice.   Even a Plymouth of those years would work too.  Chrysler Corporation cars, especially DeSoto, were the choice for taxi companies as they were rugged, reliable, easy-to-repair, and ubiquitous.   As private passenger cars, they were valued for the same reason, have a fairly high survival rate now.   For that reason, fully functional, presentable examples still appear for prices well under $10K, here is an example recently for sale in your region:

    For Sale: 1948 DODGE D-24 sedan - $4,800 - Concord, NC - Not Mine - "Not Mine" Automobiles For Sale - Antique Automobile Club of America - Discussion Forums (aaca.org)

You might consider purchasing such a car for use in your film. Although this is a 1948 model, Chrysler products were visually unchanged for the three postwar years, would be the choice of a taxi company who did receive a new car during 1945-'46.    We only ask that it be treated as the 70+ year old survivor car it is, be undamaged and enjoyable for the next owner when you've finished with it.   Good luck with your research.

 

BTW: Whatever car you ultimately use as a taxi, Do not show white wall tires on it!   No taxi company equipped their cars with white wall tires!    Here is a period photo of a bus station/taxi company, the sedans are all Chrysler product cars.

'40 bus stop - '39 Plymouth lwb.jpg

Very interesting. I do  want to be as accurate as possible. Thank you.

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Just now, Thomas Blitch said:

Not even close, James. Check out "Pop's Place: Some Things Are Meant To Be" on Amazon.

 

Looks like an awesome, wonderful story! I'm so glad I was wrong. Thank you for making a kind of movie/series that the world needs more of. I have family in SC with automotive connections and will let them know of your need for '40's cars. I'll gladly watch this series when it becomes available, and again, best wishes on your production!

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