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Hey all Nash lovers, I'm considering a new acquisition of one of these in a recent well restored state, though I have not seen it in person as yet. Where does this particular model sit regards to its prestige, it's obviously not at a Duesenberg/Cord/Cadillac/Packard level ,etc., or as low as a Ford or Chev (no disrespect to those guys), I was thinking more like high end Buicks, Chryslers etc. I'm a Mopar man and have no idea.

 

And what is the rough value range of this particular model in well restored condition. Also, anything to look out for in terms of particular traits of these vehicles, ie., engine, gearbox, brakes and so forth.

 

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The 1090 Nash Ambassador (142" wheelbase) is a great car and there are almost zero of alive.

 

I remember when Richard Bloomquist had this car for sale years ago and I really wanted it.  He was looking for 75k.   This is at 32.

 

The 34 you pictured looks great without the rear wheel cover.   There is a red one floating around that doesn't look as good.

Nash1090Ambassador.jpg

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Thanks for your reply. Like you, I'm not keen on a red body on any vintage car. The wheel covers do give it much more of a prestige look. This one that I am eyeing off is priced at about us$48k

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I have the exact same 1934 LWB that was sold by Bonhams. Same long 142 inch wheelbase and two side windows instead of three windows. Only difference is that my vehicle has wire wheels instead of the artillery wheels and my car has dual sidemounts. Long beautiful vehicle F.O.B. from Kenosha factory at $1,850 per unit which price was more than a Buick, less than a Cadillac, and "streamline" styling by the famous Alexis de Sakhoffsky.  One of the magazine ads at the time in 1934 has a little girl (after seeing that "Dad" purchased the car) asking her father the following question:  "Daddy, are we richer that we used to be?" The only car I am aware that existed in that era that had dual starters other than a Rolls Royce. My vehicle is restored (armature job) but presentable. Finding parts is difficult.   I am still looking for two hubcaps for the sidemounts to replace the 1933 Hubcaps that are on the sidemounts.  The 1934 high-end coupe with rumble seat for Nash is a very rare vehicle. One was for sale 2.5 years ago in Sacramento. The seller (age 80+) wanted too much for the car which car was sky blue (factory color) and a very attractive car. Not sure if he ever sold the car however. 

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42 minutes ago, BucketofBolts said:

I have the exact same 1934 LWB that was sold by Bonhams. Same long 142 inch wheelbase and two side windows instead of three windows. Only difference is that my vehicle has wire wheels instead of the artillery wheels and my car has dual sidemounts. Long beautiful vehicle F.O.B. from Kenosha factory at $1,850 per unit which price was more than a Buick, less than a Cadillac, and "streamline" styling by the famous Alexis de Sakhoffsky.  One of the magazine ads at the time in 1934 has a little girl (after seeing that "Dad" purchased the car) asking her father the following question:  "Daddy, are we richer that we used to be?" The only car I am aware that existed in that era that had dual starters other than a Rolls Royce. My vehicle is restored (armature job) but presentable. Finding parts is difficult.   I am still looking for two hubcaps for the sidemounts to replace the 1933 Hubcaps that are on the sidemounts.  The 1934 high-end coupe with rumble seat for Nash is a very rare vehicle. One was for sale 2.5 years ago in Sacramento. The seller (age 80+) wanted too much for the car which car was sky blue (factory color) and a very attractive car. Not sure if he ever sold the car however. 


Pictures please?

 

Do you mean dual ignition, not starter?

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My dad drove a Nash through 1938-40 with the dual ignition and worm drive. They used it as a van for their band. The Vagabonds. 

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Thanks gents for the information, I may have to pass on this if parts availability is an issue. Though its a beautiful looking automobile.

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  • 2 weeks later...

With incredible styling by Count Alexis de Sakhnoffsky, these are truly awesome cars in their fine details.   Recognized by the CCCA too, are they not.  

I've considered several but the one I really missed was the one and only Coupe that was for sale in New Zealand and ended up in the UK last I heard.  Kick myself on that one!

 

53003628_2278017972519485_3924761176877039616_o.jpg

nash30.jpg

fs_nash34.jpg

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11 hours ago, BucketofBolts said:

Stop kicking yourself. There is still a 1934 Coupe for sale I think in Loomis California. 

That lead and no other info.  Come on,  your killing us.  Give us some details. 

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On 4/2/2021 at 9:28 PM, BucketofBolts said:

Stop kicking yourself. There is still a 1934 Coupe for sale I think in Loomis California. 

There are a LOT of LaFayettes out there.  Some "Advanced" 6s and 8s on the 121" w.b.   An Ambassador on the other hand, is on a 133" wheelbase.

 

40_12_sba.jpg

Edited by StillOutThere (see edit history)
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I spoke to the owner 2+ years past, a fellow about 84+ now assuming he is still shaking the trees at his age. He had it at auction but the high BID did not make the "reserve". I think he still owns this car. The color is correct as I have an Ambassador Sedan Model 1297 LWB at 144 inch that is the same color. A littler more than two years ago at the auction I did not see a problem with the springs. The restoration was by the owner himself. The car was in great shape and drove well. A very rare car but not concourse. Sometimes it is very difficult to let a car go when you have so many hours and decades of your life invested in restoring the car. Sadly none of his many children are old car enthusiasts so he has no offspring to pass on this lovely car. Now for me I purchased not one but five 1933 Buick cars just because they remind me of my Dad who owned a 1933 Victoria Coupe since after WW2 when he needed a cheap ride to go back & forth to University on the GI Bill. Every time I see an image of a 1933 Buick I think fond memories of my Dad. If I had the $$$$$ I would have purchased a B- 26 Martin Marauder because that was the plane my Dad flew in WW2. 

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On 3/13/2021 at 8:44 PM, maok said:

Where does this particular model sit regards to its prestige, it's obviously not at a Duesenberg/Cord/Cadillac/Packard level ,etc., or as low as a Ford or Chev (no disrespect to those guys), I was thinking more like high end Buicks, Chryslers etc. I'm a Mopar man and have no idea.

The Nash Advanced and Ambassador Eights were part of a short-lived phenomenon that arose in the late 1920's frenzied prosperity.  Medium-priced automaker, taking note the increasing sales popularity of the entry-level luxury cars such as mid-$2,000's Packard Six and LaSalle, decided to develop model series that would slot in price-wise above $1,750 to the $2,200 mark.   In order to compete, they had to match or better the specifications of those popular luxury makes.  Consequently, 126" wb and above 300 ci displacement engines plus transitioning to eight cylinders from larger sixes defines the group.  The late 1920's was generally the end of the period for American-made, six cylinder luxury cars, Franklin notwithstanding.  Imported six cylinder luxury makes were still considered prestigious.

 

The long list introduced between 1926-1932 included, Chrysler Imperial L-80, Studebaker President Eight, Graham-Paige 835, 629 & 827, 837, Hudson Models O & L, Hupmobile Custom Eight Model H & U, Buick 129, 60 and 90, Auburn 115, 120, 125, Nash 490, 890-990, Advanced & Ambassador 1090-1290, Elcar 96, 120, 130, Gardner 8-95, 125, 130, 140, 150, Kissel 8-95, REO Royale 8-31, 8-35, Willys-Knight 66 & 66A.   As these luxury contender arrived, so did the economic reversal that immediate evaporated their market segment.  Some were in development at the turn only to be introduced into that rapidly plummeting economy, wonderful cars but an exercise in futility.   Those automakers that didn't fail immediately gave their premium models a few seasons in the event the Depression would prove short-lived.  Once its durability was manifest and the losses mounted, rationalization of their model selections occurred, a few salvaging the name to elevate a lower-priced 'luxury' model as line-leader. 

 

Ask a simple question, get a dissertation. 

 

        

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  • 2 weeks later...

I spent my life in the apparel industry and I can tell you that it's my opinion that very few people, women included, should make important color choices without lots of assistance.

 

This is a terrible Strawberry Red color for any car:

1934Nash1290.jpeg

 

This is close to a nice color, but it has too much blue in it which makes it, too, look somewhat "berry" like:

fs_nash34.jpg

 

Lastly, this is a case of some guy thinking that any blue looks good with any red:

380_1934_Nash_Other_a1109cfa-fc3d-46de-8580-a991ca4756e8.jpg

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It's just my opinion, but I think that red on this Chrysler convertible that's for sale in the Chrysler forum is much more balanced than the one on the '34 Ambassador. (Not that anyone should have ever painted that sedan red to begin with):

 

123810195_2850131655232120_4449820402840134693_o.jpg

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It is apparent from the discussion that many do not like the red on the 34 Ambassador above. You should be aware that it was not a questionable choice when someone restored it but was consistent with 34 Nash advertising for the Ambassador 8. At least in the artists rendering it appears very classy. 

 

34 nash dealer poster.jpg

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1 hour ago, Hybrid said:

It is apparent from the discussion that many do not like the red on the 34 Ambassador above. You should be aware that it was not a questionable choice when someone restored it but was consistent with 34 Nash advertising for the Ambassador 8. At least in the artists rendering it appears very classy. 

Restorers should research the colors offered rather than rely on artists' conceptions in company advertising.  I used to see at a local concours a 1930 Packard 733 touring in three shades of purple displayed with a framed magazine ad (painting) showing the same body style in the same colors--but none of my Packard friends thought anything ever left the factory looking like that.

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4 hours ago, Grimy said:

Restorers should research the colors offered rather than rely on artists' conceptions in company advertising.  I used to see at a local concours a 1930 Packard 733 touring in three shades of purple displayed with a framed magazine ad (painting) showing the same body style in the same colors--but none of my Packard friends thought anything ever left the factory looking like that.

 

There is a purple Reo Royale that was painted to match the magazine advertisement.   That was unfortunate, and the seller's son learned how much when he tried to sell the car for the estate.

 

1931-reo-royale

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Back in the 1950s and 1960s car owners would justify a bright color on a pre war car by having a magazine ad of the same year showing the car in day glo colors. Magazine ads were a marketing ploy to attract the reader of a magazine who would not look at an ad with conservative colors most of the time. It was the same for a car in a showroom even up into the 1970s - put a red convertible in there and draw the crowd in to see it who would then wind up buying a sedan in a conservative color.

Look at period color chips and go by that ( larger the chip the better, not something 1/2 inch high by 2 inches long against a white back ground paper.) Do you want "flashy" or period correct. People who designed the cars wanted the customers to see their work, their designs/styling not a flashy color. But flashy magazine ad colors are what sold cars and got people to go look at a car in a showroom.

It compares to loud music from a "boom box" in the 1960s - got your attention, but was that what you would play at that level when you got home?

 

My back ground and education is in art, and in the past 2 decades I have chosen colors for cars for owners and restorers by request - still am. 

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To Walt's remarks I'll ad that it's important to remember that sales brochures, as well as chip charts, are just ink, and not paint. Also, maybe consider buying enough paint to spray one panel and then study it. Also, ask questions of your paint guy. I'm sure that he has opinions based on his experience. No good paint guy wants your vintage Nash to be painted tomato red, unless he thinks it's what you want.

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Hudsy 's comment is spot on. When I was restoring my 41 Packard and my 31 Franklin I knew what colors I wanted, but on the suggestion of the fellow who was painting the car ( who learned his trade in the 1940s) he said I had to get a piece of masonite, prime it sand it and then get a quart of the color I wanted ( can't buy a pint) use that paint with the known current formula available to spray the 12 inch by 12 inch masonite panel that was primed and sanded to have a LARGE color chip to hold up against the car and stand back to let it sink in your mind . This is especially true of you are using two different shades of the same color. It is worth the $ to pay for the paint to do this. All of the paint that I used were color matched to paint colors used on late model European cars - Mercedes Benz, Jaguar etc.  they had more to offer in straight , plain , non metallic "ballistic futuristic" modern colors. 🧐  If you look at a color look at it in natural light, not under fluorescent light! the fluorescent light will totally change the color especially if you are looking at a postage stamp size chip. For pre war vehicles I found that the chips made by ACME were the best representation and faded the least over a period of 80+ years. if the chip is faded somewhat ( and isn't ting to start with) use a very light rubbing compound on it ( very tiny bit) or wax to bring back the luster. This is the "homework" you have to do before you spend $700 plus on color, primer , etc. This isn't guess work on my part so far as advice, I have done this numerous times .

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