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Cars In Barns


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Where I used to live on the central Ca. coast there was a car guy that always came to our early Saturday morning pastry / coffee place. One day this car guy invited all of use guys to his ranch. This guy had a 3,000sq. ft. house and huge shop and huge garage all built under a huge mega barn. Turned out he did this to avoid property taxes, building permits etc. Said he didn't care because when he left it would be feet first so it wouldn't matter.

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That page also said "Oldsmobile F-85 Jetfire Hardtop Coupe 4-speed (man. 4 speed)
as offered for the year 1963 until September in North America"

 

A synaps twigged that back in the day a GM four speed got a white shift knob and a three speed was black. Also remember driving to Georgia with a friend who had a 63 turbo Cutlass with a 4 speed. (Guarentee nothing from near 60 yar ago).

 

Found this on Tempest . Was also a slant six in a Valliant that had a 4bbl. Really dredging but think NASCAR had a "baby" class for compacts in the early 60s.

 

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23 minutes ago, padgett said:

That page also said "Oldsmobile F-85 Jetfire Hardtop Coupe 4-speed (man. 4 speed)
as offered for the year 1963 until September in North America"

 

A synaps twigged that back in the day a GM four speed got a white shift knob and a three speed was black. Also remember driving to Georgia with a friend who had a 63 turbo Cutlass with a 4 speed. (Guarentee nothing from near 60 yar ago).

 

Found this on Tempest . Was also a slant six in a Valliant that had a 4bbl. Really dredging but think NASCAR had a "baby" class for compacts in the early 60s.

 

Over the years, NASCAR experimented with a number of different racing classes. Seeking to capitalize on the emergence of compact cars as the 1960s began, NASCAR created the Cannonball Compact Car Division. On Feb. 9, 1961, NASCAR staged a compact-car race on the Daytona International Speedway road course. Ralph Earnhardt drove a four-door Pontiac Tempest in the event. Seventeen drivers competed, seven of whom went on to become inductees into the NASCAR Hall of Fame, including race-winner Lee Petty (2011), Fireball Roberts (2014), Tim Flock (2014), Curtis Turner (2016), Joe Weatherly (2015), Ned Jarrett (2011) and Cotton Owens (2013).

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NASCAR did indeed put on a series of races for compact cars in 1960, and Chrysler made what they called a Hyperpak option package  including a 4 barrel carb for the slant six. The Valiants wiped the floor with everybody, coming in 1 - 2 - 3 in the first race. When it turned out this was not a fluke NASCAR cancelled the series. Whenever Chrysler products were winning they changed the rules so Ford, Chev or Pontiac could win. Reason, when Dodges and Plymouths were winning they drew thousands of spectators, when Ford Chev or Pontiac won they drew tens of thousands. It was purely a matter of $$$$$.

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9 minutes ago, Rusty_OToole said:

NASCAR did indeed put on a series of races for compact cars in 1960, and Chrysler made what they called a Hyperpak option package  including a 4 barrel carb for the slant six. The Valiants wiped the floor with everybody, coming in 1 - 2 - 3 in the first race. When it turned out this was not a fluke NASCAR cancelled the series. Whenever Chrysler products were winning they changed the rules so Ford, Chev or Pontiac could win. Reason, when Dodges and Plymouths were winning they drew thousands of spectators, when Ford Chev or Pontiac won they drew tens of thousands. It was purely a matter of $$$$$.

Not true, Pontiac's were the car to beat from 1957- early 1963. After January 63 G.M. pulled Pontiac and Chevrolet out of racing. No R&D and no support. Then total  Ford in 1963.

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On 3/22/2021 at 6:03 PM, padgett said:

You prefer "reassembed the bits with all of the synchromesh rings (which were shredded anyway) left out so he had a four speed transaxle and no synchromesh." No shop so the trailer was the only flat/clean/well lit spot we had. Hard part was keeping track of all the loose bearings. Used axle grease to stack them. Back then we called a transmission with no synchros a "crash box". What were they supposed to be called ?

I understood your first post perfectly. It must be the way we grew up.

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Not sure I ever grew up. Suspect is part of the problem, have always loved to tinker and particularly at race tracks you used whatever was available to get the car back on the track. Coat hangers, duct tape, different carbs (never use an HD-6 where an HD-8 will fit) & carried over in later life when a 2N278 replaced a D-501. Used to put WEH - What Ever is Handy in the materials section of prototype engineering drawings.

 

Franky is why I am amused at some judging rules when "originality" is supposed to be the criteria. To verify "originality" would require disassembly and date codes. Am particularly intrigued when I see an older car with a 10SI alternator (common on TV).

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Olds Toronado FWD. Thought I wanted one for a while but a Vixen suited me better. Helped a friend get one from here to northern Arkansas. About Tallahassee the unobtainium alternator died. Had parts at home but decided to press on. Drive all day, find a LaQunta (also had puppy along), remove GRP 31 AGM (I like AGMs), charge in motel room all night, drive during daylight, repeat.

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13 hours ago, Pfeil said:

Not true, Pontiac's were the car to beat from 1957- early 1963. After January 63 G.M. pulled Pontiac and Chevrolet out of racing. No R&D and no support. Then total  Ford in 1963.

That's what you think. Chev, Pontiac, and Ford never left racing. Instead of corporate sponsorship they had dealer sponsorship so corporate could keep their hands clean and honor the racing ban - on paper. In reality the corporations continued to develop racing parts and sell them thru their dealers.

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34 minutes ago, Rusty_OToole said:

That's what you think. Chev, Pontiac, and Ford never left racing. Instead of corporate sponsorship they had dealer sponsorship so corporate could keep their hands clean and honor the racing ban - on paper. In reality the corporations continued to develop racing parts and sell them thru their dealers.

By 1963 Pontiac had developed based on the Pontiac block a SOHC 389 & 421, a DOHC 389 & 421 and a SOHC 230 six. Only the OHC six made it out of engineering. The reason all the V-8's were stopped was of the anti-racing and racing development edict from the 14th floor. The indirect result of this was it forced Pontiac to take some of it's racing stuff off the track and put it on the street ( in order to remain in third place in sales and to still attract a youth market) The car that went on the street in 1964 was the Pontiac GTO.

Can you imagine what would have happened to the Chrysler Hemi if it were up against a Pontiac 421 DOHC 4 valves per cylinder Hemi??? In the interim even a SOHC Pontiac would have no problem.

SOHC             DOHC 4 valve

image.jpeg.0f249f660fb8114ae003fd0403505de6.jpegHere's the four engines. They were all supposed to go into production not just the six.

SOHC 3 valve  OHC six

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1 minute ago, Pfeil said:

   Not true, was racing a Catalina and by June of 63 all the left over SUPED DUTY pars were gone and no more was made.

 

   By 1963 Pontiac had developed based on the Pontiac block a SOHC 389 & 421, a DOHC 389 & 421 and a SOHC 230 six. Only the OHC six made it out of engineering. The reason all the V-8's were stopped was of the anti-racing and racing development edict from the 14th floor. The indirect result of this was it forced Pontiac to take some of it's racing stuff off the track and put it on the street ( in order to remain in third place in sales and to still attract a youth market) The car that went on the street in 1964 was the Pontiac GTO.

Can you imagine what would have happened to the Chrysler Hemi if it were up against a Pontiac 421 DOHC 4 valves per cylinder Hemi??? In the interim even a SOHC Pontiac would have no problem.

SOHC             DOHC 4 valve

image.jpeg.0f249f660fb8114ae003fd0403505de6.jpegHere's the four engines. They were all supposed to go into production not just the six.

SOHC 3 valve  OHC six

 

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Maybe I'm dating myself but this is what comes to my mind when I think of cars in barns. My '21 Chevy spent some time there before my new shop was built.

1921 Chevy in barn.jpg

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On 3/8/2021 at 7:51 PM, alsancle said:

Ed,  It isn't a barn find if guys in the know knew about it.

 

This was a real barn find,  because NOBODY knew about it.

schumacherRaceTrackWeb.jpg

July 2014 Thumb Drive Dump 048.JPG

What is that (the vehicle, not the barn)?

 

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10 hours ago, padgett said:

Chev looks more interesting but carbs are not stock.

 

 

How do you know that? You can honestly tell if those carbs are a 3361 and a 3362 or not?  They look like AFB's from the photo, but I can't zoom in to tell which ones they are. The Air Cleaners are incorrect. There are other things that are blatantly incorrect, that you don't mention 

Edited by John348 (see edit history)
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This 1923 Kissel Gold Bug was in a crammed full shed in mid state Michigan a few years ago. It was rolled into that shed in 1956 and not moved since. The tires still held air. I bought it. It was stored next to an early 1930’s Rohlston bodied, split windshield Lincoln roadster. Wish I would have bought that one as well!

Ron Hausmann P.E.

B1380046-1B9B-498F-A841-1991E80FB624.jpeg

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A8884963-CC34-4666-934F-07FB3FB25DF8.jpeg

E9369F0C-2363-41E0-8109-D3EAC125747F.jpeg

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21 minutes ago, ron hausmann said:

This 1923 Kissel Gold Bug was in a crammed full shed in mid state Michigan a few years ago. It was rolled into that shed in 1956 and not moved since. The tires still held air. I bought it. It was stored next to an early 1930’s Rohlston bodied, split windshield Lincoln roadster. Wish I would have bought that one as well!

Ron Hausmann P.E.

B1380046-1B9B-498F-A841-1991E80FB624.jpeg

BAD49092-0121-450E-A8C0-A5B77D8C379F.jpeg

C5BD2973-4281-4C74-A6EB-0BB9AFCDCDAA.jpeg

A8884963-CC34-4666-934F-07FB3FB25DF8.jpeg

E9369F0C-2363-41E0-8109-D3EAC125747F.jpeg


Ron, did you take any pictures of the Rollston?

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Al,

    I apologize as when I hit the button, I remembered it was a Packard Rollston, not a Lincoln rollston. It had been butchered into a tractor, but the cab, hood, fenders, and engine were there. I’m a Kissel guy so I wasn’t that interested then. Since then, someone bought that 1931 Packard Rollston and restored it. If you google it today, she’s a real beauty!

    Ron

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23 hours ago, padgett said:

Ed: was that a Canadian barn ? Does not look like an American 67 Pontiac. Chev looks more interesting but carbs are not stock.

It's a Oshawa Ontario built Strato Chief with the factory installed 283 2bbl PowerGlide. Canadian and British Commonwealth market car, as well as CKD for the European countries.

 

Never seen the 62 Impala before until I went to pick up the 67 Pontiac. Have NO idea about it's heritage or past background. It's currently NOT FOR SALE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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13 hours ago, lelshaddai said:

Picked up these two 27's today. 27 Buick, 27 Chevy. This is an old chicken farm barn in Phoenix. Cars were there for over 40 years.IMG_5645.jpg.f1e209d68f98caf12107e0c9ed3c9e35.jpg

 

IMG_5649.jpg

How do you guys find these things?  Question I suppose related to the original posts intent.  Is this something you knew about, stopped in waved a few greenbacks around? Do you advertise for 'will pay for old cars'?  

 

It always amazes me at what guys are still finding.

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All of my looking now is online & usually for a specific make, model, and year. Has taken serveral months before but always find. Florida title is near a must. Out of both space and license plates (plates stay with owner here).

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The two 27’s  I brought from A long-term friend of 50 years. His father owned the chicken farm and he placed these two in there long ago and he also had a 29 Graham.I didn’t even know he had the cars until two years ago. He knew I was into cars and wanted to know if I knew anybody who wanted them. At the time I didn’t know anyone and I didn’t have any space to store them. I recently have space now so I re-contacted him and he was more than willing to sell them to me. 

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Some years ago, I helped pull a 1912 White gas roadster body out of a barn. The barn had been a three story building but it had collapsed down to a 1/2 story. The body was sandwiched in between two floors with just enough room to snake it out. The car had been taken apart with bits and pieces stored all over. I had hopes it would be put back together but last I knew, it was moved to another barn and was in worse condition.

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