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Well, this is sort of a barn. A carport enclosed on three sides. After it was restored it was sold soon after in 2015. Then the owner found the LHD difficult in Australia so clocked less than 252 miles. I bought it late February 2021, through the dealer who sold it to the PO.
 

It is a happy car, makes me smile ( nah really grin) every time I drive it! Had its first oil change yesterday and service by me. 
Rodney 😀😀😀😀😀😀😀

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18 hours ago, Ed Luddy said:

I've been involved in a few finds over the years and I'm going to see another this week. A 1963 Studebaker Avanti. I will report back. Today I went to retrieve a "garage find" my friend bought. I went along to verify some details, etc. Then later this afternoon we went to get a 1978 VW convertible out of a barn, but I will post pic's of it tomorrow.

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nice find- for sale ?? /S

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When did they begin allowing importing cars to Oz without a RHD conversion ?

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The concept of barn-/field-/garage-/shed find is hugely “over-romanticized” and misused term(s) for what basically amounts to neglect.

There likely are millions (or likely more) of them everywhere on this planet. 
I know countless of them and while many are considered “very valuable” by their owners, most aren’t worth the dirt they’re sitting on or covered with.

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My 38 was actually in a barn in NW PA. For 42 years. Not a true barn find as it was advertised with one very poor picture that was blurry. It was up on blocks, well covered and moth balls all around it, under it and in it. Only bad part of paint was the hood as it had a bale of hay sitting on the cover. Original paint everywhere else. I looked for the pictures of hauling it out but can’t find them as we have moved twice since finding it. 
 

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Edited by SC38DLS (see edit history)
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1 hour ago, TTR said:

The concept of barn-/field-/garage-/shed find is hugely “over-romanticized” and misused term(s) for what basically amounts to neglect.

There likely are millions (or likely more) of them everywhere on this planet. 
I know countless of them and while many are considered “very valuable” by their owners, most aren’t worth the dirt they’re sitting on or covered with.

Value is another nebulous concept. It used to be that cars brought more money in a auction sale on the West coast than they did on the East coast. If one has to sale to settle an estate or because of illness, prices will be down but if one has time to wait for the right buyer, value will be much different. Value is not just in dollars and cents. I may not be able to get as much money out of my cars as I think they're worth, but that does not make them any less valuable in my eyes. Just because you think my cars aren't worth dirt, does not make it so.

 

While I'm on this tirade, value changes almost monthly. Cars that had little value in the past, now bring big money and cars that sold well in the past, today, well, you get the idea. Sales take place when the buyer and seller agree on the price. Auction sales fall through on a daily basis because of this and there are a lot of factors that go into this.

 

My cars belong to me. If I want them to rot into the ground, so be it. It may be a sad thing to you but in this country, I have that right and no amount of disparaging will change that. I once had a friend who restored a car and took it to an auction to sale. It brought $60,000. Six months later it sold again for $80,000 and six months later it sold for $100,000. Six months after that it brought $110,000 at auction but the final price six months later was $120,000. It went off into a museum and hasn't come up for auction again. It didn't receive any upgrades during this time. How much was the car worth?

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Well, the car is located in Switzerland. The owner didn't know much about it. All he knew is that his grandfather had purchased the car in the early 1920's and that it had been used as an officers car in the French army. Since all car papers got lost I contacted the GM Heritage Center in Detroit and ordered the builld sheet for the car (thanks to Charley). According to the sheet the car had been shipped from the Cadillac factory to Geneva in Switzerland on June 20th 1913 to a gentleman named John Meynet (we didn't have Cadillac dealers in the country at that time). Meynet was the founder of the Swiss car make Sigma (Société industrielle genevoise de mécanique et d'automobiles). He was the sole holder of the Knight patent in the country and built sleeve valve engined cars between 1909 and 1914. Meynet was a Swiss/French dual citizen and happened to serve in the French army as an infantry officer. Now the thing is, when WWI broke out he went to war and drove the Cadillac to the battle fields in France in order to fight against the German forces (the French army vehicle ID numbers are still on the fenders). He survived the war and drove the Cadillac back to Switzerland where he sold it to the grandfather of the gentleman I purchased it from. He then drove the car sporadically untill WWII broke out. Due to shortage of gas at the beginning of the war they decided to put it in storage so they hooked it up to the ceiling of a barn. During the war they slowly dismantled the car. The upholstry had been used to stuff a matress for the children, rims and wheels had been used to build a wagon etc.

Overall the remains are in exceptional good condition considering the age. The engine still turns over, the clutch disengages, the brakes still work and the transmission gears look like new. Nothing seems to be worn or abused and all bolts loosen easily.

I believe this is a true low milage car.

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Our A was a barn car in 2 places prior to our ownership.  Hardly rare but our A spent decades in a PA barn before the prior CT owners brought it here. 

In CT, I should have taken a pic of the place it was when we bought it.  Owner had a tobacco barn, if your familliar with those you know they are not really tight.  Inside the barn, was a storage barn for this guys collector cars.  Clever.

Edited by Steve_Mack_CT (see edit history)
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5 hours ago, TerryB said:

Yes, it goes from Lancaster to Pine Grove in Schuykill county PA and is the main N/S route. I used to live north of Lititz.

I think that may be the route I took to 81? I worked in Ringtown for about 8 months about 8 yrs ago.

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I ran a wanted ad in Antique Automobile, not expecting that anyone would reply, once I saw this picture I wired the money. I posted this photo before on another thread

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8 minutes ago, TAKerry said:

I think that may be the route I took to 81? I worked in Ringtown for about 8 months about 8 yrs ago.

Yes, would be possible to get to 81 easy from 501.

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Monza? What year? My best friends older brother bought a brand new Nova that was white with red white and blue accents. Looking back I always thought it was a '76 and built for the bicentennial, but it may have been a little earlier, maybe a 75?

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For about four years, I lived in a Califunny North coast area that had hundreds of old barns around. I always figured there had to be some old automobiles hidden in some of them, but never looked. That area is also well known for decades of 'illegal farming crops'. Poking your nose anywhere off the road was well known as a good way to end your life suddenly! There were back roads around that even long-time local residents wouldn't ever drive past a certain point.

 

As for the term "barn find", I also don't really like it. It used to mean something. Now it is so over-used that it means basically nothing. It started out meaning usually an earlier car, that was put away during the depression years, or during or shortly after WW2. Cars were usually put away because they had become too old or inefficient to be worth being maintained and used, or WW2 rationing made them impractical to be used. The other reason and sometimes not-so-early cars from the 1930s would be put away was after new cars really became available in the late 1940s. (There were also early cars similarly retired a couple decades earlier simply because the technology had changed so much they were impractical to keep in regular use.) Either way, the cars weren't worth much, not worth the trouble to sell, weren't really hurting anything. Also, the "never-throw-anything-away" mentality heightened by the depression encouraged people to save those old cars, 'just in case'. About three decades later, they became 'barn finds'. That meant something.

Edited by wayne sheldon
I hate leaving typos! (see edit history)
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7 hours ago, TAKerry said:

Im not really a vette guy ( that was until my buddy let me behind the wheel of his Zo6), but I would love that 65. Clean it and keep it just that way, really cool period car.

Yeah, that vette caught my eye as well. I would love to have it !

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59 minutes ago, TAKerry said:

Monza? What year? My best friends older brother bought a brand new Nova that was white with red white and blue accents. Looking back I always thought it was a '76 and built for the bicentennial, but it may have been a little earlier, maybe a 75?

 

It is 1977 Monza Mirage, 305 with a four speed, they made around 4,000. A year too late for the Bicentenial. It is going to be the next one go as I downsize. It cleaned up real nice

 

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Yeah guys the corvette is really cool last raced in 1977 owner is a really great guy asked if it was for sale he said not shure yet frame is really chopped up set up for Ford 9 inch. Tilt nose has a 427 hilbourn injection Told him he should buy a stock rolling frame and set the body on it and make it streetable  he’s thinking about it Trying to load a video of the car racing in 1968 but not working 

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I bought this one on a JetBlue flight using text messages. Interesting deal, and yes it was in a real barn since 1962 till 2017. 1929 Pierce coupe. Cleaned up well. Ran and drove great. Lots of fun. 

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6 hours ago, padgett said:

When did they begin allowing importing cars to Oz without a RHD conversion ?

 

Imports have always been allowed, to the best of my knowledge. Registering them for road use is another story. and the laws vary widely from state to state.

 

Thirty years ago, when I imported LHD cars into Tasmania, you could register them for road use if a large yellow and black sign reading 'Caution LHD Vehicle' was displayed across the rear. I actually converted all of my imports to RHD, as this was allowed on vehicles over 30 years old at the time. There was quite an industry across Australia converting cars, and some of the conversion work tended towards rather suspect engineering concepts.

 

Here in Tasmania, I'm told we can now register and drive a LHD vehicle which is over 30 years old, and there are quite a few driving around. In Rodneybeauchamp's state of South Australia, above, their Govt website says you cannot, (20/11/2020) and a motoring site says that you CAN register LHD cars there. And Rodney appears to be driving his. So? This highlights the confusion here when faced with an array of state government sites and on-line opinion.

 

There you go, Padgett, the answer is as clear as mud.

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It is my understanding that South Australia was a state in which you could register and drive a LHD car.

 

Concerning New South Wales, where I live, if the vehicle is over 30 years old it can now be registered and driven as LHD.  Previously you couldn't, hence there were many shops doing conversions to RHD as Bush Mechanic said.

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A few weeks ago I was talking with my cousin - a long time old car guy although his health now precludes working on them. I mentioned the 1920 Cadillac I've been working on and he told me there were two mid-20's Cadillacs in a barn not 2 miles from his house...

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13 hours ago, John348 said:

 

It is 1977 Monza Mirage, 305 with a four speed, they made around 4,000. A year too late for the Bicentenial. It is going to be the next one go as I downsize. It cleaned up real nice

 

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43215281721_c1425be3e7_c.jpg2018-07-05_09-19-58 by Kerry Grubb, on Flickr

These tags would fit right in with that car. MD issued a one year only Bicentennial plate in '76. Mom had them on her car in the day. I was lucky to find a really nice set at Carlisle. When I registered them with the state the girl at the DMV had no idea what they were, I had to explain them. Of course this was when states typically issued one style plate across the board, none of the dozens of different designs for every cause under the sun like is around today. Ironically, I had to have the YOM plate inspected but yet MD requires no inspection for an antique car.

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a) dozens Meh. Florida has more than dozens, even many different license plates. LEO (law enforcement officer) just looks for a current sticker.

b) 4k Mirages. High production. Pontiac made 63 Notchback and 66 Fastback 1978 Sunbirds with V8 & 4-speed. Also an H-body.

 

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And I can confirm it drives very nice! The current owner was on tour with us in Texas two week ago. He has fantastic taste in early cars. I rank this car as a top five Cadillac in the world........and currently my favorite of all known cars with a Cadillac badge. It’s just a fantastic car, very well done. 

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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19 hours ago, AHa said:

Value is another nebulous concept. It used to be that cars brought more money in a auction sale on the West coast than they did on the East coast. If one has to sale to settle an estate or because of illness, prices will be down but if one has time to wait for the right buyer, value will be much different. Value is not just in dollars and cents. I may not be able to get as much money out of my cars as I think they're worth, but that does not make them any less valuable in my eyes. Just because you think my cars aren't worth dirt, does not make it so.

 

While I'm on this tirade, value changes almost monthly. Cars that had little value in the past, now bring big money and cars that sold well in the past, today, well, you get the idea. Sales take place when the buyer and seller agree on the price. Auction sales fall through on a daily basis because of this and there are a lot of factors that go into this.

 

My cars belong to me. If I want them to rot into the ground, so be it. It may be a sad thing to you but in this country, I have that right and no amount of disparaging will change that. I once had a friend who restored a car and took it to an auction to sale. It brought $60,000. Six months later it sold again for $80,000 and six months later it sold for $100,000. Six months after that it brought $110,000 at auction but the final price six months later was $120,000. It went off into a museum and hasn't come up for auction again. It didn't receive any upgrades during this time. How much was the car worth?

 OK ...

... or whatever, I guess ??? 😕 

Edited by TTR (see edit history)
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11 minutes ago, edinmass said:

And I can confirm it drives very nice! The current owner was on tour with us in Texas two week ago. He has fantastic taste in early cars. I rank this car as a top five Cadillac in the world........and currently my favorite of all known cars with a Cadillac badge. It’s just a fantastic car, very well done. 

The story I got when I discovered it, was that a lawyer had owned it and left it to his nephew. Do you have a photo of it in it's current state?

 

Edited by keiser31 (see edit history)
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4 minutes ago, keiser31 said:

The story I got when I discovered it, was that a lawyer had owned it and left it to his nephew. Do you have a photo of it in it's current state?

 


 

Not sure as to the story. It was displayed at Amelia in 2020, and I can’t fine any public photos of it on google. I didn’t photograph it at the show.....wish I did.  

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Just now, edinmass said:


 

Not sure as to the story. It was displayed at Amelia in 2020, and I can’t fine any public photos of it on google. I didn’t photograph it at the show.....wish I did.  

What color is it now?

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57 minutes ago, keiser31 said:

What color is it now?

 

A stunning dark silver/gray metallic. It's an appropriate choice as the metallic is very fine. Very tasteful. 

 

Found a lousy photo.......

IMG_1909.jpg

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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