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1 hour ago, padgett said:

You missed the 50 pages in the owner's manual on how to fasten a set belt.

 

Think the concept of a "driver's car" ended about 2015, glad all of mine are earlier.

 

  Tillotson carb on my Harley was very simple, the magneto ignition, not so. My mistake for getting an XLCH.

 

"but the gear ratios are so close together (to keep engine RPMs in the most efficient band)" This I do not understand. Variable Valve Timing (VVT) gives us a torque band that is 90% of peak from 2,000 to 6,500 rpm and suddenly we need 10 gears ? Makes no sense to me.

 

Of course once upon a time I knew all of the Pontiac zone reps. No more.

 

Stupid thing: my 12 Jeep Grand Cherokee is a better road/trip car & gets better mpg than the Cad CTS which is smaller, weighs less, and has the same size engine with VVT

My first HD was a 1978 XLCH,  Loved that bike. Bit rough around the edges but thats what Harleys were back then.

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1 hour ago, TerryB said:

I am sure glad I’m not in the market for a newer car today.  All the touch screen nonsense is ridiculous.  I guess getting a printed manual is still happening.  My wife’s 2018 Subaru came with at least four manuals.  It’s a job just figuring out which manual you need when you are trying to figure out what button or setting to use. What is really needed is a check box in the manuals that puts a mark next to the equipment that your car has so you know to skip over the other 8 possible options for heater controls your car does not have.  That would save time and grief.  I expect the next models will use the display for this information rather than a book to save $$$.

 

I agree. I have trouble with my smart phone at times, and need one of my kids to bail me out. That would keep me from wanting a car that might get me in a similar predicament. I like two main features of my smart phone: GPS and internet for locating businesses when I'm out and about. Along with the phone function, those are the only things I want, and nothing else. Nevertheless, the phone takes me to a screen I don't want when I need to use my phone in a hurry. I KNOW there's some way out of it, but I don't don't want to spend five minutes figuring out what it is. My philosophy is: I want a phone and GPS, NOT a new way of life that a substantial portion of my time is involved in figuring out. A car that would do that to me would be a nightmare. I don't want to feel like Dave talking to Hal.

 

The "I'm sorry, Dave" Scene in 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) - YouTube

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Ive warmed up to a smart phone, know enough about computers to be dangerous. Unfortunately I am in the market for a new truck. My ole trusty ford is having a hard time with emissions, although the engine runs great for nearing 300k miles. Def not buying new though.

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7 minutes ago, plymouthcranbrook said:

I did learn the hard way that for daily drivers especially in winter I want the most common fix it anywhere get parts anywhere car I can find. And as reliable as possible. Less popular cars are often fun but when it breaks in January when it is 10 degrees below zero and the parts people say” you want a part for what! 😂. Been through that too many times in my life.  As a toy, sure. Otherwise no.

 

All of my vehicles, including my daily drivers, are old enough that most parts aren't in stock anyway. I have a stockpile of critical spares (it helps to have a number of cars with common parts), and two day delivery with Prime helps a lot. Plus, we have four daily drivers to ensure two are running at any given time. To be honest, I haven't had to drive a lot in the last year, anyway. 😉

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Getting back to the original post of not feeling any connection to modern cars, I fully agree. I believe it is in large part because we don't/can't work on them ourselves anymore. In (many?) years past, we changed our own oil, tuned the engine, added headers, changed carbs, put on fancy wheels, etc., etc., etc. Today, because of sensors, emission controls, and computers that won't recognize some aftermarket parts we don't do anything with our cars.  Heck, we can't even check trans fluid levels because there's no dipstick! It is only getting worse. Our newer cars tell us if the tire pressure is low, if we're speeding, low on oil/gas, drifting out of our lane, adaptive cruise control keeps the right distance between cars, our cars can begin accelerating in stop-and-go traffic when the car ahead moves forward, and they stop if needed when we aren't paying attention. We are no longer drivers. We are passengers in our "appliances" that take us from point A to point B. Because of this we have no personal connection to our cars. That's why we love our classic and antique cars. They need us.

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When Ford Model As we’re new I doubt many people saw them in the same way we do today.  They were just another car on the road.  The trick is do they withstand the test of time, do they give you good memories or were they part of your experience of life?  That’s what helps make the difference.  I would sure enjoy having another 1977 Chevy Nova Rally as much as my first car, a 1951 Pontiac.  More of a good vibes thing than how much I worked on it.  A 1963 Chevy Impala SS 327 is on my always wanted to own list to too, and a 1962 SS, and...yes, the list goes on.  My wife would like another 1993 Chevy Cavalier station wagon for the same reasons, it was her favorite car so far.

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Just now, TerryB said:

When Ford Model As we’re new I doubt many people saw them in the same way we do today.  They were just another car on the road.  The trick is do they withstand the test of time, do they give you good memories or were they part of your experience of life?  That’s what helps make the difference.  I would sure enjoy having another 1977 Chevy Nova Rally as much as my first car, a 1951 Pontiac.  More of a good vibes thing than how much I worked on it.  A 1963 Chevy Impala SS 327 is on my always wanted to own list to too, and a 1962 SS, and...yes, the list goes on.  My wife would like another 1993 Chevy Cavalier station wagon for the same reasons, it was her favorite car so far.

In the mid-seventies when we formed a local chapter of the Studebaker Drivers Club, we would often approach those driving a Studebaker in a parking lot, or even go up to a house and knock on the door if there was one parked in the driveway.  While we did gain some members this way, to many of them we approached, they were simply a daily transportation device, and not interested in preserving it as we would now.  In that case, we would provide contact information, should they decided to sell.

 

Craig

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Kids are fascinated by the touchscreen in my 88 Reatta. Buick dumped it in 1990, customers did not like.

Android phones have an app called "Android Auto" that is reduced functionality, mostly just GPS, phone, and music.

There is one button on my CTS that is essentially "clear display". I have a velcro dot onnit so can feel.

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My wife bought a new Ranger. I absolutely hate every single thing about "controlling" it, but will admit it is nice riding, handles OK, and runs like a muscle car (turbocharged)...... except for the gas not being "let off" the instant you get off the pedal. BUT, if I want to do anything with the radio, adjust the mirrors, try to get a fan / heat, or air adjusted, re-set the mileage for gas fill-ups, find the clock, or almost anything else, it is much safer for me to just stop, figure it out if I can, or forget about it and just go on. Oh, I am able to roll the windows up and down now, but the drivers side is of course smarter than us and flies all the way up or down if the button is touched. That blasted screen in the middle of the dash is by far the most annoying thing I have ever encountered in a vehicle. The lights flashing in the rear view mirrors are next, and the sounds coming from somewhere when I back up, pull up, or get close to something are, well, grrrrrrrrrrrrrrr.   Even the "key", which is a huge switch-blade like devise does things (or doesn't) that I don't appreciate.... and it's WAY too big to be comfortable in my pocket.  Excuse me, I'm going out, get in my little, used to be considered full-sized Studebaker, pump the gas twice, turn the nice, small, cheap and easy  to replace key, pull a nice sturdy lever to where I want it to be, and drive off smiling.   Oh yeah, this "mid-sized or possibly compact" Ranger is so tall, I can walk up behind it and lay my chin on the tailgate (which is locked because it does that automatically !!!) without leaning over .  Gee, I felt pretty good until started writing this, ha, ha !  Thanks for all the posts folks, it's nice that I'm not alone.

IMG_2954.JPG

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They have to justify the insane new vehicle prices somehow.  More gadgets =more dollars on the price tag.  The standardization of control locations has been tossed out the window too. It’s obvious why many older folks kept their cars forever, they knew what every button and lever did, including wind up windows with a crank (because we get cranky when we get old!).

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10 hours ago, Max4Me said:

Getting back to the original post of not feeling any connection to modern cars, I fully agree. I believe it is in large part because we don't/can't work on them ourselves anymore. In (many?) years past, we changed our own oil, tuned the engine, added headers, changed carbs, put on fancy wheels, etc., etc., etc. Today, because of sensors, emission controls, and computers that won't recognize some aftermarket parts we don't do anything with our cars.  Heck, we can't even check trans fluid levels because there's no dipstick! It is only getting worse. Our newer cars tell us if the tire pressure is low, if we're speeding, low on oil/gas, drifting out of our lane, adaptive cruise control keeps the right distance between cars, our cars can begin accelerating in stop-and-go traffic when the car ahead moves forward, and they stop if needed when we aren't paying attention. We are no longer drivers. We are passengers in our "appliances" that take us from point A to point B. Because of this we have no personal connection to our cars. That's why we love our classic and antique cars. They need us.

Don't say "WE", say I . 

I work on all my cars including the new ones. 

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23 minutes ago, John Byrd said:

My wife bought a new Ranger. I absolutely hate every single thing about "controlling" it, but will admit it is nice riding, handles OK, and runs like a muscle car (turbocharged)...... except for the gas not being "let off" the instant you get off the pedal. BUT, if I want to do anything with the radio, adjust the mirrors, try to get a fan / heat, or air adjusted, re-set the mileage for gas fill-ups, find the clock, or almost anything else, it is much safer for me to just stop, figure it out if I can, or forget about it and just go on. Oh, I am able to roll the windows up and down now, but the drivers side is of course smarter than us and flies all the way up or down if the button is touched. That blasted screen in the middle of the dash is by far the most annoying thing I have ever encountered in a vehicle. The lights flashing in the rear view mirrors are next, and the sounds coming from somewhere when I back up, pull up, or get close to something are, well, grrrrrrrrrrrrrrr.   Even the "key", which is a huge switch-blade like devise does things (or doesn't) that I don't appreciate.... and it's WAY too big to be comfortable in my pocket.  Excuse me, I'm going out, get in my little, used to be considered full-sized Studebaker, pump the gas twice, turn the nice, small, cheap and easy  to replace key, pull a nice sturdy lever to where I want it to be, and drive off smiling.   Oh yeah, this "mid-sized or possibly compact" Ranger is so tall, I can walk up behind it and lay my chin on the tailgate (which is locked because it does that automatically !!!) without leaning over .  Gee, I felt pretty good until started writing this, ha, ha !  Thanks for all the posts folks, it's nice that I'm not alone.

IMG_2954.JPG

You should try making a living working out of that truck. Try lifting a 90LB MK wet saw over the bedrail.

Do you know that the ultimate admission of guilt was in the truck market? When they started making automated folding steps at the back of the truck. The admission was they made a WORK truck too high and made it for a want-a-be pickup driver.

How about a practical solution where you can get to all sides, even fold them down and load the bed with a forklift?

They did it years ago;

1958/59 Volkswagen Bus Brochure | Volkswagen bus, Volkswagen, Commercial  vehicle

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Where were all you guys when people were calling me an idiot for not being able to master all the electronic crapola? Seems I'm not the only one frustrated with the extreme level of over-electronification that they're building into cars today.

 

I suspect this nonsense is not making anything safer, it's just allowing people with a lower skill level to not die immediately upon entering the public roadways. I guess that's good, but when dying was a very real danger of driving, I think people took it more seriously and worked to be skillful.

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57 minutes ago, Pfeil said:

Don't say "WE", say I . 

I work on all my cars including the new ones. 

 

I work on newer cars also, and even have the requisite electronic test equipment. The fact remains that it isn't particularly fun or rewarding. And there are a LOT more potential failure modes. It seems like in my case, these failure modes are never ones that set a code or are easily diagnosed with a scan tool.

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Hey Joe, you don't own a newer car! Nothing in that list is OBDII.🤣 

 

I know, "newer" is a relative term. Newer than a carburetor? Well, you have one fuel injected I see.

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On 3/6/2021 at 2:16 PM, TerryB said:

 I expect the next models will use the display for this information [how to operate the systems] rather than a book to save $$$.

 

"My touch-screen is acting up again."

 

"Darn it!  How to use and fix the touch screen

is given on the touch screen itself!"

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12 minutes ago, Frank DuVal said:

Hey Joe, you don't own a newer car! Nothing in that list is OBDII.🤣 

 

I know, "newer" is a relative term. Newer than a carburetor? Well, you have one fuel injected I see.

 

I'm not proud about my 1999 Chevy crewcab dually... That's why I got the Genysis Scan Tool and that's the one that is giving me fits. I'm trying to finish the 1984 crewcab dually as fast as possible to replace it. 😉

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One time I was visiting my uncle half-way

across the country.  He was to drive me back

to the airport.

 

He had a new Ford sedan with built-in GPS;

and being a technophile, of course he wanted

to use it.  So how to locate the airport?  It wasn't

in the categories of "restaurants" or "hotels"

or "attractions."  He didn't have anything to select.

 

He went into the house and got the phone book.

There was the address of the airport!  But as we

were en route to the sprawling airport complex,

with all its own roads and ramps, it quickly became

clear that the GPS was taking us to the administration

building!

 

So much for 20 minutes of fooling with the computer.

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On 3/4/2021 at 6:57 PM, plymouthcranbrook said:

I was thinking the other day(I know, dangerous) and realized as I was driving my Chevy Traverse  down the road that I really, for the first time I can remember, did not feel any attachment to the car at all. It was like I was driving the refrigerator down the road. Ever since I began driving about 100 years ago I always felt, even on cars I did’t particularly care for, a sense of oh, I don’t  know,  oneness with the car.  I always enjoyed driving darn near anything and still enjoy the heck out of the old Plymouths.  But this one and to a lessor extent my wife’s Kia Soul, not so much. Anyone else like me or is this just another case of my being odd?

 

Guess I'm the odd one.  I've always felt attachment to my cars, new or old - some more than others but always some feeling for them.  Maybe that's because I've bought only cars that held some attraction for me.  Each had its "personality" and foibles.  But even the gremlins (problems, not car model 😉), while frustrating, resulted in satisfaction when they were exorcised.

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For post-'95 cars I have three computer tools:

Torque Pro - great for basic codes and parameter display ($25 with dongle)

Autel Diaglink with appropriate modules (under a benjamin on Amazon) - does in depth scans and readouts

Tech2Win (bit over a benjamin) - PC software for GM with a USB dongle.

However prefer ALDL (GM 1981-1995), easy to reprogram see Moates.Net. Scan tool:  OTC 2000 with 1993 Pathfinder cartridge.

 

For pre-computer have lots including an O'scope/ignition analyzer.

 

Is good to have the right tool for the job.

 

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Pfeil, I know about the lifting over stuff, ha !  We had a normal Ranger...05 I think, before this one, and it was fairly easy. My best "easy to use" trucks were an F-350, ( my fav "real" truck of the bunch, shown below) two F-150s, a 66 F-100, and an 84 long bed Chevy, all with a "Tommy Lift" !!!   Love those things. All my Rancheros and a 56 F-100 were really easy to load/ unload too, and the Studebaker trucks were reasonable height too, but just never used either one of them for big load or hauling duties. We worked for an old man on a farm when I was a kid, my dad did the heavy lifting and driving, but the "ramp-side" he had was the Corvair version. I even had a fold down ramp on the passenger side you could have went up in a wheelchair !   Now, not trying to start anything here, but like all the rest of the early Corvairs in our town, it didn't last very long, so a V-6 GMC pickup replaced it.ha !

F350 wtape 6-09 002.JPG

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54 minutes ago, padgett said:

However prefer ALDL (GM 1981-1995), easy to reprogram see Moates.Net.

 

I've got a Moates sytem (including a prom burner and emulator for the laptop) because I had the delusion that I wanted to play with converting some of my cars to TBI. The reality is that the aftermarket technology has advanced so quickly that it really isn't worth it, and frankly, as I get older, I'm appreciating the carb more and more. I AM considering using an OBD I computer and sensors to provide easy ignition timing control, however. I like the idea of dragging points in the spark map on the screen instead of messing with advance springs and weights and stops and vacuum cans.

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Yes, the vast majority of new cars are far too nanny tech laden.

But constant govt mandates and tort lawyers along with each company trying to outdo the others with the list of gee-wiz gadgets they can stuff in a car have turned driving into a less enjoyable experience for most.

I do appreciate some of the tech in newer cars but the lane assist / control is one of the things I could do without.

Another is the AEB (Automatic Emergency Braking). Ever have you car slam on the brakes because a plastic bag or a tumble weed was blowing across the lane?
It's not a pleasant experience.

 

But I do service my modern cars with the help of one of my ODB I or ODB II scanners.

The newest scanner can even reprogram new keys or fobs to the car and reset the steering angle sensor.

My favorite thing about that scanner is I can even email a complete diagnostic report to myself, or anyone else, after the scan is complete.

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Did someone mention touch screens?? Well, once it warms up enough to mess with dash trim and such I will be replacing mine on Caddy ATS.  Cadillac won't take care of it despite a 90% faillure rate.  Apparently one panel is plastic, one glass with a gel in the middle.  They expand and contract at different rates, and crack.  You tube and an aftermarket replacement at $250 beats dealer's $1,500 quote. 

 

I do like the car generally though.

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24 minutes ago, Steve_Mack_CT said:

Did someone mention touch screens?? Well, once it warms up enough to mess with dash trim and such I will be replacing mine on Caddy ATS.  Cadillac won't take care of it despite a 90% faillure rate.  Apparently one panel is plastic, one glass with a gel in the middle.  They expand and contract at different rates, and crack.  You tube and an aftermarket replacement at $250 beats dealer's $1,500 quote. 

 

I do like the car generally though.

 

That's a known issue with the Cadillacs. I thought there was a warranty extension or TSB on those. I have a client whose late-model Cadillac SUV we detailed and he said we cracked the screen. We did a little research and it turns out this is a very common issue. He had it repaired under warranty even though the truck was no longer covered by the 3/36. He also sheepishly apologized because we didn't break it and regretted accusing us. But GM fixed it for him, no cost.

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Thanks Matt, I struck out w my dealer twice in this, car is a 15, but just ticked over 30k miles, anyway I am out of my 3/36.  I have yet to make the big stink, maybe because I am kind of sold aftermarket replacement is better because its either all glass or plastic, cannot recall which.  Still, I may run it by Cadillac anyway.

 

BTW as you once said, after a couple years of ownership, if you half turn a few paces after parking to admire your car that is a good sign. 😊

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That is called the Cadillac "CUE" system. Fortunately mine is a year before and can display my cell phone on the NAV screen. Of course GM is famous for the OPTI-Spark, putting the starter under the intake manifold, and wedging the thermostat into the firewall. However to me the cake is taken by a defective balance gear (stolen from Buick) in a 350 Mercedes that requires pulling the engine to repair.

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I service my own cars for over 90% of the work. I avoid the "professions" for the other 10% "like the Covid".

 

Although my career was never automotive related, I never stopped working on cars from my fist introduction in my preteens. As a lifelong hobby I grew with the technology. In my work life computers became a part of my daily job in 1974. So the hobby cars and work technology were pretty much concurrent. Nothing scary out there. I have two communication buses in the BMW that are quite similar to token ring networks I used in the 1980's.

I would prefer to buy tools than hire work.

 

There are a lot of misconceptions about automotive computer systems. Boogie men in those circuits in one story or geniuses that tell those dumb younguns how to fix cars in the next story.

 

Somewhere in my collection of stuff I have an automotive trade magazine with an article entitled "If the Doors on Your Shop had been Locked for 10 Years" could you open tomorrow? The magazine is from 1940. I bet I acquired it close to 40 years ago. The concept of the article has stayed with me and I have frequently thought of it. I also remember a coworker who was described as "a good figurer". Like good at math? No, good at figuring things out. Oh, adaptive vocabulary like the adaptive skills, got it.

 

Youtube has some good presentations when you seek them out. I have found Schrodinger, here, has some valuable lessons in OBDII https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCnIQ-_hRpyHR68f23dQQHUg

I have learned quite a bit from the series over the past 3 years (when I bought the 760li. If you have no formal training it is a good source.

 

Back to the topic, I have been driving my modern 1994 Impala SS the last few days. It has a personality. When you put your foot into it the car says "Cop" in a firm and powerful manner. We connect. It's like the GM execs had a meeting to address the need for a performance sedan. One guy says "Yeah, how about a cop car with aluminum wheels and leather seats". Bought it 9 years ago. No regrets.

016a.thumb.jpg.6df46f18c05aed0c9a57175ad9b732dc.jpg

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1 hour ago, 60FlatTop said:

I service my own cars for over 90% of the work. I avoid the "professions" for the other 10% "like the Covid".

 

Although my career was never automotive related, I never stopped working on cars from my fist introduction in my preteens. As a lifelong hobby I grew with the technology. In my work life computers became a part of my daily job in 1974. So the hobby cars and work technology were pretty much concurrent. Nothing scary out there. I have two communication buses in the BMW that are quite similar to token ring networks I used in the 1980's.

I would prefer to buy tools than hire work.

 

There are a lot of misconceptions about automotive computer systems. Boogie men in those circuits in one story or geniuses that tell those dumb younguns how to fix cars in the next story.

 

Somewhere in my collection of stuff I have an automotive trade magazine with an article entitled "If the Doors on Your Shop had been Locked for 10 Years" could you open tomorrow? The magazine is from 1940. I bet I acquired it close to 40 years ago. The concept of the article has stayed with me and I have frequently thought of it. I also remember a coworker who was described as "a good figurer". Like good at math? No, good at figuring things out. Oh, adaptive vocabulary like the adaptive skills, got it.

 

Youtube has some good presentations when you seek them out. I have found Schrodinger, here, has some valuable lessons in OBDII https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCnIQ-_hRpyHR68f23dQQHUg

I have learned quite a bit from the series over the past 3 years (when I bought the 760li. If you have no formal training it is a good source.

 

Back to the topic, I have been driving my modern 1994 Impala SS the last few days. It has a personality. When you put your foot into it the car says "Cop" in a firm and powerful manner. We connect. It's like the GM execs had a meeting to address the need for a performance sedan. One guy says "Yeah, how about a cop car with aluminum wheels and leather seats". Bought it 9 years ago. No regrets.

016a.thumb.jpg.6df46f18c05aed0c9a57175ad9b732dc.jpg

Your modern 94 is in antique status can show it as is in DPC !

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On 3/9/2021 at 8:14 AM, Matt Harwood said:

Where were all you guys when people were calling me an idiot for not being able to master all the electronic crapola? Seems I'm not the only one frustrated with the extreme level of over-electronification that they're building into cars today.

 

I suspect this nonsense is not making anything safer, it's just allowing people with a lower skill level to not die immediately upon entering the public roadways. I guess that's good, but when dying was a very real danger of driving, I think people took it more seriously and worked to be skillful.

Matt, I've been saying it since I bought a new 74 Ranchero GT and the seat belt, seat empty, seat loaded, door ajar, and other crap I don't remember started going off. Back then fortunately, none of it was hooked to the engine, transmission, dealers place, manufacturer's watch line, or "the cloud", so I cut all the blasted bells and alarms off with wire cutters as I found them. HATE being controlled by someone else's idea in a machine with bells, whistles, voices from a computer, screen, or flashing lights  in my own space I'm supposed to be controlling. grrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr.  Still have my wire cutters, but afraid to use them on Karen's new vehicles.  My old Mini or Studebaker just does pretty much what I want without commenting or "going off" about it, ha !

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It's called "distracted driving". I have two '89s and an '11 each with digital displays and over 70 buttons, switches, and sliders within the driver's reach. At least the '11 has an analog clock. '88 Reatta touchscream is much easier.

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4 hours ago, padgett said:

It's called "distracted driving". I have two '89s and an '11 each with digital displays and over 70 buttons, switches, and sliders within the driver's reach. At least the '11 has an analog clock. '88 Reatta touchscream is much easier.

Sounds like you need a co pilot or perhaps a navigator.

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What do you consider "newer vehicles" ? (in subject line).

Problem with a co-pilot is like a '69 Grand Prix the instrument pods are angled toward the driver & have a console. Reatta touchscream is codrivable.

 

OTOH I have put bluetooth/handsfree systems (I consider safety items) either under the passenger seat or in the glove box. These have remotes.

 

And on the gripping hand, my usual passenger is "technologically impaired" (has Apples).

 

For many thingies, Velcro dots are essential.

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21 hours ago, padgett said:

For many thingies, Velcro dots are essential.

It was the Japanese that made the texture of the driver's power window switch different from the other three in the early 1980's, so it could be 'find by feel'.

 

Craig

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On 3/9/2021 at 1:14 PM, Matt Harwood said:

Where were all you guys when people were calling me an idiot for not being able to master all the electronic crapola? Seems I'm not the only one frustrated with the extreme level of over-electronification that they're building into cars today.

 

I suspect this nonsense is not making anything safer, it's just allowing people with a lower skill level to not die immediately upon entering the public roadways. I guess that's good, but when dying was a very real danger of driving, I think people took it more seriously and worked to be skillful.

Matt I had to laugh when I read this as I thought you were going to blow a fuse! Or was it a chip or transistor or solenoid???  Not making it safer is an understatement. 
Just a personal opinion but I am a firm believer in taking personal responsibility not  having some electronic gadget auto correct my steering and braking. I worry it will work as well as the spelling correction on phones works, most of the time but a high error rate. 

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On 3/10/2021 at 8:58 PM, ted sweet said:

what does this  have to with antique cars???

I think the original idea is to compare how people look at the 'new' cars they drive and if there is any level of enjoyment and pride as compared to their antique cars they have. Seems relevant.

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7 minutes ago, SC38DLS said:

Matt I had to laugh when I read this as I thought you were going to blow a fuse! Or was it a chip or transistor or solenoid???  Not making it safer is an understatement. 
Just a personal opinion but I am a firm believer in taking personal responsibility not  having some electronic gadget auto correct my steering and braking. I worry it will work as well as the spelling correction on phones works, most of the time but a high error rate. 

 

You are 100% correct.  The lane warning lane correct features on my 2019 Escalade work about 10-15% of the time.  That's an 85-90% failure rate.  It's been in the shop 5 times and still not fixed.  I've always been a stickler for using turn signals during lane changes, but since having the Escalade, I intentionally change lanes without signals just to verify that the %@$#*& system still doesn't work.  For those unfamiliar with the system, if you drift about halfway into an adjoining lane, the steering wheel nudges back toward your original lane, and either a warning bell sounds or the driver's seat buzzes, depending on which setting is engaged.

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I always enjoy driving any old car. They are all a little different. Most of them have a personality of their own. Modern cars can be more like a toaster. Unless you pick put one that is a little different. Then you get to enjoy some personality. 

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Edited by Brass is Best (see edit history)
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