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1940 Continental Cabriolet needs engine


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I will do what you suggested. I really appreciate your comments.  I first want to see if we can get the engine running. You telling me ballpark figures, helps do much. I wanted to leave it to one of my sons but they don’t have room for it . I would like to get it in running condition so each of my children and grandchildren can drive it around town and then sell it. I will get more pictures.

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If you can find an old, retired mechanic who is familiar with fifties Fords he would be the best to get your car running. The secret is to go over the engine carefully, checking and diagnosing, and not change anything unless it needs to be changed. Too often amateurs tear the car up, replace all kinds of parts unnecessarily like points, coil, carburetor etc then wonder why it won't run. The oldest man in the world couldn't tell you that, once you have everything messed up all you can do is start from scratch and do EVERYTHING over until you are sure it is right. If you start with an untouched engine you assume it ran when parked, and check everything one step at a time and if you have gas, spark, and compression all happening at the right time the engine will start and run.

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3 minutes ago, Lynn Aungst Kiedrowski said:

Thank you everyone! Does anyone know where I can get a sample of oil from the pan tested for the small pieces of metal that are in it that maybe would tell us where the metal is coming from?

How small is small?  Shiny fragments in the oil that just sparkle or actual pieces that you can feel between your fingers?

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The torque specs are as follows:

Rocker Arm Cover - 2 to 2.5 ft. lbs.

Oil Pan to Crankcase - 12 to 15 ft. lbs.

 

Crestline was the top of the line 1954 Ford. The Mainline was the base car. Both could have the 239 CID engine.

Lew Bachman

1957 Thunderbird

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If you are curious about metal in the pan you can wash the oil away with cleaning solvent (hardware store paint thinner is good) rinse it around, let the metal settle and pour off the solvent, then use a magnet to pick up any steel and iron fragments. Whatever is left will be non ferrous, either aluminum or bearing metal (white) or bronze or brass (yellow).

Any metal in the pan is not good.

I think I would put the pan back on, fill with oil and get it running. If it has good oil pressure and no bangs or knocks it's good to go. Metal in the pan could mean anything or nothing. Depending how much there is.

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