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Comical reactions to your car


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Sometime in the 80s I had a blue/gray 1953 Imperial at a small local car show. I was asked by an older guy to open the hood.

At the same time a group of teen aged boys were walking by, one recognized the engine was a Hemi and said to the others "Who would put one of those in that big old boat"

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1 hour ago, 28 Chrysler said:

At the same time a group of teen aged boys were walking by, one recognized the engine was a Hemi and said to the others "Who would put one of those in that big old boat"

 

Hah! The factory.

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A couple more to add to the silly questions stories:

 

1.  About 20 years ago I had a Model A.  The local Model A club had a drive to a riverfront town that had a restaurant with angle-in street parking, and the spaces were reserved for us.  We arrived, parked very neatly at an angle along the curb, and went in to eat.  After lunch, I went to get something from my car, and a spectator asked:  "How did you get all those old cars in here?"  I said:  "Weren't you here when we arrived?  It was quite spectacular.  We got the Army to lower each car into place, one at a time, from a big helicopter.  They're due to come back and get us, starting in about 20 minutes.  Stick around!"

 

2.  I often drive an antique on a local errand.  My cars nowadays are all brass-era, so they tend to draw spectators.  Sometimes I come back to my car and someone asks:  "Is this in running condition?"  "My preferred response is:  "I sure hope so.  I need to get it home, and it's too heavy to carry and too far to push."

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at a local car show I was asked is that a model T ?   no   well it must be a model A again I said no. Well what is it. I said it is a 1920 Willys Overland. The man looked at me and said oh that is the 

same company that made the gassers, well I guess you can say that  

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Not sure if it's comical but I had multiple people ask me "what year is that Model A" when I had my 34 Packard. I let them down easy but there was at least one who said "Packard - who made that?" I always wished there was a Model A parked next to me when someone asked the first question.

ext6.JPG

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I've gotten used to people thinking the Starfires are Impalas, the Ninety Eight a Cadillac or Lincoln 😒 and the Toronado a Riviera. 

 

When I explain my 1974 Cutlass is a Hurst/Olds, "Never seen a hearse looked like that!"

 

20 some years ago I had the Toronado out and a high school boy glommed onto it. At school the next morning he told his auto tech teacher about this wild 60s front wheel drive car he'd seen, and his teacher told him he was full of it, that there were no FWD cars in the 60s.

 

Kid hunted me down the next weekend and begged me to bring the car to his school and show the teacher. The 20-something teacher looked at it and said "you did a great job converting that car". No son- General Motors built it this way in 1969. You never saw such a bewildered look, with the kid saying "I told you it was real!"

 

 

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5 minutes ago, rocketraider said:

Kid hunted me down the next weekend and begged me to bring the car to his school and show the teacher. The 20-something teacher looked at it and said "you did a great job converting that car". No son- General Motors built it this way in 1969. You never saw such a bewildered look, with the kid saying "I told you it was real!"

And I'll bet that teacher was one of those who disliked being proven wrong by his student.  I've had a couple like that.

 

Craig

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74 H/O - was that the one with a digital tach on the console ?

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1 minute ago, padgett said:

74 H/O - was that the one with a digital tach on the console ?

That would be too early for digital displays in automotive application.

 

GM was experimenting with LCD in 1975.

 

Craig

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Wasn't GM, this was a Hurst stand alone on the console in early 70s, just not sure what year. 

This one ? I remember repairing one, circuit was pretty simple.

 

hotach.jpg

Edited by padgett (see edit history)
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Optional for 73-75 H/O and sometimes seen on a 72. Mine doesn't have the cheesy thing, it has the Stewart Warner Hurst Motor Minder instead. Fancy name for a vacuum gage.

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I stopped in at the local Timmy's with my '29 McLaughlin-Buick Master club sedan. Sitting at the table next to me a guy said "Yep,my dad had one just like that. Good old Model A Ford".  Just like TexRiv_63 and his Packard above, the material in the McLaughlin-Buick would make at least two Model As. 

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Whenever they ask the year I tell them and then confide:  'I'm driving this one because I can't afford the new one'

You can see them trying to work it out.

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4 hours ago, J3Studio said:

Jut a few years ago, someone asked me quite earnestly if my 1985 was the new Corvette.

^^ This reminded me of an incident about 10 years ago, when friend of mine drove his '71 Ferrari 365 GTB/4, which by that time he had owned and driven wheels off for over 30 years, to some supermarket and two ladies in their 50's(?) approached, commented how "pretty" it was and asked if it was some "brand new type of car" since they've never seen one like it before. 

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5 hours ago, 8E45E said:

And I'll bet that teacher was one of those who disliked being proven wrong by his student.  I've had a couple like that.

 

Craig

 

School and I never got along very well. I think a lot of people that read this forum very much have realized that I am quite passionate about history and a number of other subjects. I was a terrible student, usually bored out of my skull listening to teachers trying to break through the densest of students with things I had learned years earlier. One year of history in the senior year was required for graduation. And it was no different.  The first month of class, I was getting Cs and Bs on everything, which MOST of it was written answers and graded totally by the teacher's opinion. One day, the teacher was droning on about the first decades of the Union, and said something about some legislation favored by one of the early presidents, that I knew to be wrong. So, after class time ended, I politely, with NO other students present to hear, told the teacher he was wrong and the what and why what he said was wrong. He was not nice about it, stating emphatically that he was RIGHT and I was WRONG. So, when I had a few minutes between classes, I dashed into the library, and checked out two books that clearly stated what I had said was right. The next day, again politely, again with NO other students around to hear (I was being considerate!). I showed him the information in the books. He was livid! My grades went from the Cs and Bs (for which I made almost no effort) down to Ds and Fs on anything other than multiple choice tests of which there were few. Just for kicks, I even made some real efforts to give thorough yet concise answers just to see what sort of grade I could get. I would see some really lame answers given by other kids getting Bs and As, and the best I could get was a D. I graduated with a D- in history. I was and am certain he rigged the grade to get me out with the lowest grade allowed for graduation. I KNOW he did not want me back the next year.

 

Back to comical relief!

Edited by wayne sheldon
I hate leaving typos! (see edit history)
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4 hours ago, padgett said:

Wasn't GM, this was a Hurst stand alone on the console in early 70s, just not sure what year. 

This one ? I remember repairing one, circuit was pretty simple.

 

hotach.jpg

Oh that!  I do remember it somewhat.  I took it with a grain of salt because of its blatant 'add-on' appearance.

 

Craig

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15 minutes ago, wayne sheldon said:

 

School and I never got along very well. I think a lot of people that read this forum very much have realized that I am quite passionate about history and a number of other subjects. I was a terrible student, usually bored out of my skull listening to teachers trying to break through the densest of students with things I had learned years earlier. One year of history in the senior year was required for graduation. And it was no different.  The first month of class, I was getting Cs and Bs on everything, which MOST of it was written answers and graded totally by the teacher's opinion. One day, the teacher was droning on about the first decades of the Union, and said something about some legislation favored by one of the early presidents, that I knew to be wrong. So, after class time ended, I politely, with NO other students present to hear, told the teacher he was wrong and the what and why what he said was wrong. He was not nice about it, stating emphatically that he was RIGHT and I was WRONG. So, when I had a few minutes between classes, I dashed into the library, and checked out two books that clearly stated what I had said was right. The next day, again politely, again with NO other students around to hear (I was being considerate!). I showed him the information in the books. He was livid! My grades went from the Cs and Bs (for which I made almost no effort) down to Ds and Fs on anything other than multiple choice tests of which there were few. Just for kicks, I even made some real efforts to give thorough yet concise answers just to see what sort of grade I could get. I would see some really lame answers given by other kids getting Bs and As, and the best I could get was a D. I graduated with a D- in history. I was and am certain he rigged the grade to get me out with the lowest grade allowed for graduation. I KNOW he did not want me back the next year.

 

Back to comical relief!

Home-schooling has become very popular here, well BEFORE Covid.   A lot of it has to do with incompetent teachers as you have experienced, although in fairness, some of it, is what they are forced to contend with is beyond their control.

 

Craig

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5 minutes ago, 8E45E said:

Home-schooling has become very popular here, well BEFORE Covid.   A lot of it has to do with incompetent teachers as you have experienced, although in fairness, some of it, is what they are forced to contend with is beyond their control.

 

Craig

 

Here also. Home schooling was basically NOT allowed when I was in school except in rare health situations. I knew someone that had a child dying of leukemia that was required to continue with education but could not be exposed to other students for health reasons. He was being home schooled at that time, and at that, licensed tutors had to be involved.

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Try driving a Studebaker GT Hawk. Most people ask what is it, small amount ask if it's a old Mercedes-Benz.  This is at car shows, cruise nights, and just local gas stations. These are truly forgotten cars in my lifetime!

buckeyestew 001.jpg

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All 56 and 57 T-Birds have flip open vents in the front fenders, put there to facilitate cooling the car's interior. The 55s don't have these vents and the interior can get pretty hot on a summer's day. On more that one occasion I have had some well meaning soul roll down their window when sitting next to me at a traffic light and tell me that my gas filler door was open. I always thank them for their concern and tell them it is actually a vent, not a gas filler door.

Lew Bachman

1957 Thunderbird

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When they were young, I drove my nephews to school in the rumble seat of my ‘30 Buick. When we pulled up to the building, a neighbor kid runs up to one of the boys and asks sincerely “Did you travel through time”?

 

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1 hour ago, Ed Luddy said:

Try driving a Studebaker GT Hawk. Most people ask what is it, small amount ask if it's a old Mercedes-Benz.  This is at car shows, cruise nights, and just local gas stations. These are truly forgotten cars in my lifetime!

buckeyestew 001.jpg

 

I guess those that think Mercedes-Benz could be forgiven as there is a vague similarity to the grilles - and there was a Studebaker/Mercedes-Benz connection for a time back in the day.

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Have a couple of Hurst dual gate shifters. 67 is well built, 68 is not so.

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53 minutes ago, plymouthcranbrook said:

I guess I have lead a sheltered life as I never saw that before. Had to go to Youtube to see how it works.  

And if you're lucky no one before you has operated them out of sequence and locked them up. 

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2 hours ago, Ed Luddy said:

Try driving a Studebaker GT Hawk. Most people ask what is it, small amount ask if it's a old Mercedes-Benz.  This is at car shows, cruise nights, and just local gas stations. These are truly forgotten cars in my lifetime!

buckeyestew 001.jpg

 

I think most independent makes are pretty much forgotten.

My Rambler has a badge on the back that says 440H for the trim level. I've had people ask if it has a 440 with a Hurst shifter in it. I say nope, it has the mighty AMC 195.6 OHV with a Twin Stick. 😄

lakephoto.thumb.jpg.eb6df22a03f13d8487d31ede223395ba.jpg

19970180-1963-amc-rambler-thumb.jpg.5c633aaac016d74182bb841e2437d023.jpg

 

Edited by AL1630 (see edit history)
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14 minutes ago, rocketraider said:

And if you're lucky no one before you has operated them out of sequence and locked them up. 

They were rather explicit with their warnings before using them.

 

A low-mileage example shows up regularly at Show & Shines around here with the label still attached.

12th021.jpg

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12 hours ago, 28 Chrysler said:

Sometime in the 80s I had a blue/gray 1953 Imperial at a small local car show. I was asked by an older guy to open the hood.

At the same time a group of teen aged boys were walking by, one recognized the engine was a Hemi and said to the others "Who would put one of those in that big old boat"

Heck, folks can now laugh at me too, since I thought the first Imperial by Chrysler was in 1954! 🤪

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When I was a young married sheet-metal apprentice, I bought and sold cool cars for a hobby. One day I acquired a hot-rodded 40 Ford pickup for next-to-nothing, since it had a busted 50's Chevy rear end. It turned that the "pumpkin" assembly was the only thing wrong, and I quickly cleaned out the grease and metal shavings, popped in a new one, and drove it every day to work for about a year. 

 

The truck had been set up to look like a gasser from the 60's (This was in about 1976 or so), with the front end jacked up high above the straight axle, the bed shortened, and cheesy rear fenders which must have been off of a utility trailer. But the 327 engine and Muncie 4 speed were pretty strong, and the truck was light as a feather, and my young self loved driving it. 

 

One evening my pretty young wife and I hopped in and drove it to one of our favorite places for a meal and "cruising," as they call it now. It was the local A& W Root beer stand (remember those?) Anyway, we sat there for a while, as the car hops were busy. I saw some other hot cars in the lot, and noticed that their drivers and passengers were checking out my truck (no doubt wondering if it was a real race car, or just a cobbled-up piece of junk). Finally, a cute young waitress realized that we must be next, and walked up to my driver's window. I cranked it down, but before either of us could speak, she finally seemed to actually notice my hot rod. She said, "Oh my God!" in a shocked voice. I felt a little pride, thinking she was impressed. But then she started laughing. Giggling at first, but then laughing uncontrollably! I said, "What?!?" She said, "Oh my GOD, your car! I just noticed your CAR!" And she bent over nearly double, laughing till tears poured down her face. I was bemused, and looked to my wife, for her reaction. To my further shock, she was beginning to laugh too! She said, "See? I'm not the only one!" 

 

The waitress kept trying to choke out the words, "I'm sorry, I'm sorry...it's just so FUNNY! Is it like, a clown truck?" Now I was a little miffed, and went to start the truck and leave, but the waitress apologized, and pleaded with me not to go. "If the manager saw me out here laughing, and then you leave without an order, I might get fired!" My wife snickered a little more, and leaned over me and told the waitress the order that she and I always got. 

 

For a moment, I was ok with it.  But then I looked around the lot, and saw the drivers and passengers of the few other "hot rod" cars in the lot laughing their asses off! 

 

Sigh. 

 

The pictures below are the only ones I have of that truck. Sitting on a slope and in the grass, you don't get the full picture of how high that front end was raised. 

 

Sigh, again. 

20150216_153134.jpg

20150216_153302.jpg

Edited by lump (see edit history)
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Did you have fun with it? Sounds like you did. In that case scrooum.

 

Truth be known you were pretty decent about it. Shoulda rode over to the cool kids and told 'em the carhop just got fired for laughing at your truck and since their jackass braying inspired her to do it, they needed to help the poor girl get her job back. There are ways to put the cute fuzzy bunnies in their place.😏

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9 hours ago, nzcarnerd said:

 

I guess those that think Mercedes-Benz could be forgiven as there is a vague similarity to the grilles - and there was a Studebaker/Mercedes-Benz connection for a time back in the day.

Yes. Studebaker was the distributor for Mercedes-Benz in America until 1964. The 62-4 Hawk grill looks very similar to M-B's of that era.

buckeyestew 004.jpg

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11 hours ago, wayne sheldon said:

 

Home schooling was basically NOT allowed when I was in school except in rare health situations. I knew someone that had a child dying of leukemia that was required to continue with education but could not be exposed to other students for health reasons. He was being home schooled at that time, and at that, licensed tutors had to be involved.

You and I are from the same generation.

 

Craig

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8 hours ago, lump said:

Heck, folks can now laugh at me too, since I thought the first Imperial by Chrysler was in 1954! 🤪

You are off by one year.  It was 1955 when Chrysler made Imperial a standalone brand like Cadillac and Lincoln.

 

Craig

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12 hours ago, Ed Luddy said:

Try driving a Studebaker GT Hawk. Most people ask what is it, small amount ask if it's a old Mercedes-Benz.  This is at car shows, cruise nights, and just local gas stations. These are truly forgotten cars in my lifetime!

buckeyestew 001.jpg

 

Seeds of that thought were planted long ago.

THE INTERNET'S LARGEST COLLECTION OF RESTORED VINTAGE AUTOMOTIVE PRINTS.  (0) Search Cart (0) Home Search Explore Popular Collections + American  Muscle Cars Chevrolet Camaro Chevrolet Corvette Ford Mustang Explore By  Brand + ...

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13 hours ago, wayne sheldon said:

Home schooling was basically NOT allowed when I was in school except in rare health situations. I knew someone that had a child dying of leukemia that was required to continue with education but could not be exposed to other students for health reasons. He was being home schooled at that time, and at that, licensed tutors had to be involved.

 

The law is the law.

justice.jpg.0d8d3c6e57475de57faaea6cc437b267.jpg

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21 minutes ago, 60FlatTop said:

 

Seeds of that thought were planted long ago.

THE INTERNET'S LARGEST COLLECTION OF RESTORED VINTAGE AUTOMOTIVE PRINTS.  (0) Search Cart (0) Home Search Explore Popular Collections + American  Muscle Cars Chevrolet Camaro Chevrolet Corvette Ford Mustang Explore By  Brand + ...

Mercedes-Benz W110 - Wikipedia

My neighbor has a late 50s/early 60s M-B 110? sitting in his driveway, there is definitely some resemblance to the Studebaker, at least up front.

Edited by AL1630 (see edit history)
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On 3/1/2021 at 2:28 AM, John348 said:

 

Who would have thought a 1910 E-M-F would be a "babe magnet"? If I only knew.......  Great story by the way

 

Metallurgists insist that brass is non-magnetic.  But we who play with brass cars know that they are magnets for babes of all ages and persuasions. I could write a post that you'd need all day to read, but I'll just give you two examples:

 

1.  On the BBC tour a couple of years ago, I was driving a 1904 Curved Dash Oldsmobile.  We were in Amish country, and visited an Amish establishment. A young Amish father and his three kids took an interest in my car.  I asked his permission to take each kid for a short ride, and he agreed.  The youngest was a really cute girl of about 8.  When she climbed aboard, her father said:  "You look like you're in a courting buggy!"  I said my car had been a courting buggy, and sang "In My Merry Oldsmobile".  Great fun.

 

2.  I belong to a group called Cars and Croissants.  It's like a Cars and Coffee, but I live in a wealthy part of NJ and the noses are elevated to a higher degree.  Lots of Ferraris and such.  The organizers asked me to join because "We like interesting cars, and yours are interesting."  So I go in a brass car, and always have the oldest vehicle by several decades.  The organizers try to find different venues.  Once we went to a convent called The Sisters of Christian Charity.  I drove a Stanley steam car.  And yes, it was a babe magnet.

 

 

 

IMG_1964.thumb.jpg.3c896fc98d20280a388645962253af0d.jpg

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I've found that the early 60's Benz cars are very similar in a lot of ways to Studebaker's. Size, looks, dashboards, floor pans, etc. Not arguing the M-B's are a better car, but just similar in look and feel. Both brands rusted early in the Canadian climate.

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