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How to clean white walls?


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I have wide whites on my motorcycle. I use the tried and true comet with a stiff brush. Doesnt take as much elbow grease as you would think. Started doing it this way many years ago with pop's car tires and the thin white stripe at the time. Works wonders.

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 One of my chores after cutting my grandparents yard was to help my grandfather wash his caddy. This was mid 70's, I remember him getting excited about a spray on wash off product to clean the wire wheels. Up to that point it was a rag on each spoke!

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1 hour ago, Restorer32 said:

Blechley's Blech White and a soft wire brush.

 

21 minutes ago, 46 woodie said:

I also use Blechley's with a soft nylon brush and in a pinch I use those Mr. Clean scrub pads.

 

Just for clarity, for those who are learning:

The name is "Westley's Bleche-Wite," spelled

oddly, but a very useful product.  The company

may have changed hands and may not be using

the "Westley's" name as prominently.

Image 1 - Westley-039-s-Bleche-Wite-Tire-Sidewall-Cleaner-The-Original-NOS-Discontinued-HTF

Westley'S Cleanr Tire Bleche Wht64 800002223

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Some of these tire cleaner will remove paint. I found that one time I wiped down after using Bleche- White with a white cloth and it turned pink from the acrylic enamel red wire wheels. I stopped using Bleche- White as often.

Read what it says on the bottom of the container in the blue area and then what it says on the back next time what they do not want to put on the front.  

s-l1600.jpg

Edited by Joe in Canada (see edit history)
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be really careful with Simple Green.  We used to run the chemical resistance tests required of automotive plastics by the OEM's.  If Simple Green was not completely wiped off, it left permanent "watermarks" on some plastics.

 

SOS pads are a long time winner - my job as a kid when cleaning Dad's car.

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I have used both Bleche-Wite and SOS pads separately on the white lettered tires on my car.  I have had better luck with the SOS pads than the Bleche-Wite.  In some cases, I have used Comet and a good scrub brush but, the SOS pads seem to work best for me.

Tim

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1 hour ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

Just for clarity, for those who are learning:

The name is "Westley's Bleche-Wite

Yeah, I thought it was "Westley's'' too, but anymore I have a real bad case of CRS, so I wasn't about to contest it.

 

Been using it for years, but be warned, refrain from using it on old convertible tops and upholstery. It will dissolve old stitching. Cotton? It's a very harsh cleaner. Way to test a detergent for strength, put some in your palm, squeeze it, if it gets warm, be careful with it. It has petroleum distillates. Learned that from a chemical salesman.

 

Ron

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All of the above. A big one for keeping them clean is not to put on any tire shine product on the white wall/ letters. Just use those products on the black parts of the tires. Keep the white areas free and clean from any spray on products. Makes cleaning/maintenance very easy.

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4 hours ago, JamesR said:

I've also used Comet and a bristle brush, but I wouldn't use it very much or very often. It'll wear the white away, depending on the make of tire.

 

James, I'll second your thoughts on Comet.

A friend of mine, an award-winning restorer 

in my part of the state, stated:

 

---Never use Comet.  Use other brands of cleanser.

Comet has a different chemical make-up.

---Don't use steel wool, such as SOS pads or Brillo.

They abrade the tire.

---Don't use tire shine sprays on collector cars.

They aren't good for the rubber.  On modern cars used

frequently, it wears away and is less likely to cause harm.

 

He has recommended using Simple Green or a

non-Comet cleanser;  and Westley's Bleche-Wite

only if necessary.

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)
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1 hour ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

 

 

James, I'll second your thoughts on Comet.

A friend of mine, an award-winning restorer 

in my part of the state, stated:

 

---Never use Comet.  Use other brands of cleanser.

Comet has a different chemical make-up.

---Don't use steel wool, such as SOS pads or Brillo.

They abrade the tire.

---Don't use tire shine sprays on collector cars.

They aren't good for the rubber.  On modern cars used

frequently, it wears away and is less likely to cause harm.

 

He has recommended using Simple Green or a

non-Comet cleanser;  and Westley's Bleche-Wite

only if necessary.

Wonder why?  Comet is the only thing I have ever used on tires. Will even clean the blackwalls pretty good. Keeps the tires on my harley nice and white and I will continue to do so. I have never seen any problems with it. Im sure theres some chemist that will say the make up of the product is not compatible with the rubber...... But what the heck. If it aint broke, dont fix it!  I dont have anything against the other stuff, just saying what works good for me.

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  For years I used brillo style soapads and Westley's on my 

  whitewalls, then I bought Diamondback radial tires with their 

  whitewalls laminated onto name brand tires.  They   

  recommended Simple Green.   It worked so well  that I now

  use it all my whitewalls and raised white letter tires as well

  as blackwalls.   I just spray a little on a piece of terrycloth \ 

  and wipe the tire clean.  No tire black or other sprays

  needed.

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I read on another forum that Bleche-White will rot your tires to bits.

WW cleaning seems to have as many opinions as engine oil.

I've had cars with WWW since the early 80s, always use SOS pads and Bleche-White with no ill effects.

My cars are drivers but the WW stay white.

Well, in the late 50s I used Western Auto white tire paint on my '30 Ford tires, but that was another story.😀

DSCN0312.JPG

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Has anyone used "Awesome"? Ya get it at Family Dollar.  My 78 Bronco has white lettering .... I just spray and hit it with a soft scrub brush and is bright as new. 

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I stopped using Westley's 20+ years ago when I found it was removing hand-painted pin striping on steel wheels--and that was from runoff during the rinse.  I now use Simple Green at full strength and/or a proprietary concoction made in Sutter Creek CA and sold at the Ironstone Concours which I frequent.

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Question, as a "scrubbing" rubbing pad to avoid a metal like brillo etc would a plastic wool pad be better with no harm? Not just a sponge one side with  plastic scrub surface the other. You can by assorted grades of plastic wool from very fine to really course. Your opinions please . ( first time I ever typed that here!)

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I use the simple green and Bon-Ami, you know the cleaner that won't scratch.  I also use the scotch brite pads that are green in color. I don't spray any shiny stuff on tires either. I found it just attracts the dirt and dust.

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I stopped using Westley's a few years ago when I found out the formula had changed.

I had an old bottle of the original formula that I used to start cleaning my white walls and ran out.

So I purchased a new bottle under their new labeling and it did not do anywhere near the same job as the old formula.

Did some searching online and found a lot of people with the same complaint.

 

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9 hours ago, Oldsoul58 said:

An ad in the Old Cars Weekly magazine states that a 50/50  mix of lestoil and bleach works wonders and use a stiff brush.

Be careful mixing bleach and cleaners together, some can result in very harmful fumes and reactions. I knew a guy that had a pressure washer cleaning business that was mixing all sort of stuff together to make is stronger and messed himself up pretty bad. Insomnia, chronic headaches etc. He was sorta messed up to begin with and that really did him in. :)

 

Ron

 

For instance: Mixing bleach and ammonia can be deadly. When combined, these two common household cleaners release toxic chloramine gas.

Edited by Locomobile (see edit history)
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Bleche-Wite and Purple Power each have a nearly overwhelming odor. I wouldn't mix either with anything other than water. I use both with a medium stiff brush, but I have only blackwalls and narrow whites to clean.

 

Occasionally I'll get the pressure washer out but I can usually scrub and rinse the tires in less time than it takes to get it out and running.

 

Hadn't thought of Lestoil in years though my mother kept it and Texize cleaners around.

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