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For Sale: 1956 Chrysler New Yorker Saint Regis - "tri tone, always garaged" - El Paso, TX - Not Mine


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For sale on Craigslist: 1956 Chrysler New Yorker Saint Regis 2-Door Hardtop in El Paso, TX  -  $18,500  -  Call:  nine one five eight five six thirty twenty seven

 

Link: https://spokane.craigslist.org/cto/d/el-paso-1956-chrysler/7280400920.html

 

Seller's Description:

1956 Chrysler New Yorker Saint Regis 2-Door Hardtop

  • condition: good
  • cylinders: 8 cylinders
  • transmission: automatic
  • odometer: 72,000
  • paint color: custom
  • title status: clean

1956 Chrysler Saint Regis——tri tone 354 cid hemi 4bbl no rust always garaged. do not text me please call me can not respond to texts nine one five eight five six thirty twenty seven

 

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Is there a rule somewhere that says 1950s cars for sale MUST have a pair of fuzzy dice hanging from the rear view mirror?  This is a Chrysler New Yorker, New Yorker owners were not fuzzy dice people!  The owner would have been a younger professional person who wanted luxury with a dash of adventure mixed in.  The guy with the white t-shirt with the pack of cigarettes rolled up in his shirtsleeve would have fuzzy dice and drive a Ford or Chevy, not a New Yorker.

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On 2/24/2021 at 5:05 PM, TerryB said:

Is there a rule somewhere that says 1950s cars for sale MUST have a pair of fuzzy dice hanging from the rear view mirror?  This is a Chrysler New Yorker, New Yorker owners were not fuzzy dice people!  The owner would have been a younger professional person who wanted luxury with a dash of adventure mixed in.  The guy with the white t-shirt with the pack of cigarettes rolled up in his shirtsleeve would have fuzzy dice and drive a Ford or Chevy, not a New Yorker.

Terry, can you tell me who would have driven my ‘57 Skyliner? Since it’s a Ford, is it okay to have fuzzy dice? Your post makes me genuinely interested in some insight on who would have driven my car “back in the day”. 😁

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James Dean, Rebel without a Cause, lake pipes, chopped top, glasspack mufflers, mag wheels and fuzzy dice.  Sinatra, Sammy Davis Jr, Dean Martin, Rat Pack, Madmen Ford Skyliner retractable or 57 T-Bird.  Skyliner for the T-bird guy that needed more space.  Later the Happy Days nostalgia gave all 1950s cars fuzzy dice.

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The fuzzy dice we know today are apparently an extension of a good luck ritual performed by fighter pilots in the Second World War. Hung them above their instruments for luck. Tradition carried over when they got back home.
 

Has nothing to do with what make of car “should” or “shouldn’t” have them. Personally, I think the restrained layout of this Chrysler’s dash is complimented by the added dice - brings a little life to the otherwise sterile cabin 😉

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Dicing With Death 

Nobody knows which street racer hung the first pair of plastic dice over his rear view mirror, invoking the old pilots' superstition and cynicism. However, before long, plastic dice became part of a look that identified the alternative culture, like a pack of Lucky Strikes rolled up in a t-shirt sleeve. Displaying the dice meant the driver was ready and willing to be "dicing with death" in the dangerous and unregulated world of street racing.

 

However, even super cool hot rodders had to be practical. The cheesy plastic dice melted in the sunlight and were soon replaced with stuffed fuzzy dice. In the United Kingdom, they were called fluffy dice or furry dice.

 

Modern Times 

As times changed and racing became an organized sport, the kitschy dice remained part of car culture into the 1980s. Drivers would pick colors that matched their custom cars and the dice became more of a symbol of individuality than defiance. However, by the end of the 1980s, more than one state had outlawed hanging any items from rearview mirrors and the fad had, in general, become a cliche.

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In the later 1960s it was customary in my geographic area to display your HS graduation tassel from the rear view mirror.  On most dashes a small St Christopher statue was prominently displayed until he was later demoted from sainthood to becoming just Mr Christopher on your dash which just didn’t have the same ring to it.  The scented Christmas tree was also popular rear view mirror ornament. I personally never had or used fuzzy dice on my 1951 Pontiac or 1955 Chevrolet.

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I'm no fan of the dice, either.

 

Just my opinion here: despite its minor demerits for such things, I find this car very visually appealing. The color scheme is beautiful, but I have no idea if it's original-ish or not. If I was in the market, I might look at this car. I see the obscene prices of show quality '57-'59 two door hardtop or convertible Mopars and this could be a drive-able and own-able alternative. Definitely not show, but a very presentable look to it. I actually like the '56 Chryslers better than all other '50s Mopars with the exception of the '57-8 Desoto.    The only real problem with this car is its presentation. Take it outside for photos so people can see if the body is as nice as the one or two body pics suggest it is. I agree the door jamb areas are unappealing, so it would have to be checked out closely. 

Edited by JamesR (see edit history)
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  • 3 weeks later...

Actually , I own a 1956 New Yorker, and find the body design a thing of beauty.

it is a restrained version of the 57 New Yorker which I find a beautiful car as well.

my wife loves the car and shows interest in it, which is a real positive as she is not a car person.

i have won two first place trophies in two rather large car shows, and competed against some unbelievably gorgeous tri five Chevys and Fords, but the judges told me that it had been a long time since they saw a 1956 Chrysler and one that was completely restored. Nice ones are incredibly hard to find and rarely for sale, there are very few left, as most were crushed once the Hemi motor was taken out of the car.

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Hmm, it looks two-tone to me, 6T-Fin.   Why not follow up on the fuzzy dice treatment with dual spotlights and fender skirts?  I can't believe they fail to mention the Airtemp, such a desirable option.  I'd want the TorqueFlite, introduced mid-year.

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, EitanK said:

Hmm, it looks two-tone to me, 6T-Fin.   

 

Roof is black, body is charcoal gray and red.  Not my car.  Better pictures from the Seller would help to showcase different features of the car, including the colors.  I agree the gray looks almost black depending on the light.  That's also why it is not recommended to take pictures in the garage.

  

Edited by 6T-FinSeeker (see edit history)
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