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For Sale: 1939 Plymouth Roadking P7 Sedan - $10,000 - New Hartford, CT - Not Mine


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For Sale: 1939 Plymouth Roadking P7 Sedan - $10,000 - New Hartford, CT 

1939 Plymouth Roadking - cars & trucks - by owner - vehicle... (craigslist.org)

1939 Plymouth Road King. 95,000 miles, original, runs and drives beautifully. Has new brakes, water pump and head gasket. Very clean inside and out., however, there is a broken window on passenger side front (you can see in the pic if you magnify), it needs replacing due to a rock shattering the glass, it still rolls up and down though. Make a serious offer, No low-ballers please.

Contact:  no phone listed.
Copy and paste in your email:  89a402b2439f311cbd27ac8319ba8683@sale.craigslist.org


I have no personal interest or stake in the eventual sale of this 1939 Plymouth Roadking P7 Sedan.

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5 hours ago, Peter S said:

I've always wanted one of these. Can anyone who's owned one remark on their roadability and the driving experience? seems like they might be on the ponderous side...

No, not at all. This is virtually the same car that Chrysler Corp. offered for several years prior to '39. Also, almost identical to a Dodge, except the Dodge has a slightly larger engine and wheelbase. These cars are well sprung and handle well as long as you have decent shocks and tires. Lockheed hydraulic brakes are a great bonus, too.

Edited by Hudsy Wudsy (see edit history)
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Looks pretty good to me. Maybe have the front seat upholstery re-fitted, but otherwise, good to go.

I like the ribs on the whitewalls.

Agree with Hudsy Wudsy, great cars, and the asking price isn't far off the mark.

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I'm not sure what your reference point is for the "ponderous" concern.  I drove a '41 Plymouth, and for the era it is not a very large or heavy car.  Relatively small tires (I think 6.00 x 16) so easy enough to maneuver.  Very dependable engine, power similar to Ford or Chevy, but definitely more sedate than say Buick or Packard, but they weren't direct competitors.

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2 hours ago, bryankazmer said:

I'm not sure what your reference point is for the "ponderous" concern.  I drove a '41 Plymouth, and for the era it is not a very large or heavy car.  Relatively small tires (I think 6.00 x 16) so easy enough to maneuver.  Very dependable engine, power similar to Ford or Chevy, but definitely more sedate than say Buick or Packard, but they weren't direct competitors.

Bryan, I, too, am somewhat puzzled by that reference. I suppose that it's just how the car's appearance strikes people. I never cared for that "fat fender" nickname, but maybe that explains some people's impressions.

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"Ponderous" in the sense that it is a small engine in what looks like a fairly heavy body, though not obviously as large as the longer body Dodges or Desotos. I wouldn't expect it to take off like a jack rabbit from a stop sign, but probably takes a bit to get into motion. Expect an upper comfort zone limit around 55 MPH? And of course there's no pb or ps.

 

I've never owned a pre-war car, so my reference point would be something like a 1954 Chevy or the like.

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1 hour ago, Peter S said:

"Ponderous" in the sense that it is a small engine in what looks like a fairly heavy body, though not obviously as large as the longer body Dodges or Desotos. I wouldn't expect it to take off like a jack rabbit from a stop sign, but probably takes a bit to get into motion. Expect an upper comfort zone limit around 55 MPH? And of course there's no pb or ps.

 

I've never owned a pre-war car, so my reference point would be something like a 1954 Chevy or the like.

If you've driven a '54 Chevy, which was hardly cutting edge technology at the time, driving a late prewar car like this Plymouth, if the suspension and brakes are in good condition, wouldn't be that dissimilar of an experience. 55 MPH would be a good upper limit. Prewar cars can go faster if they've been properly maintained, some of them much faster, but the engine noise will tend to keep you from exceeding the other design limitations.   

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The 39 Plymouth is actually about 300 lbs lighter than the 54 Chevy, so steering and braking (provided you park with the wheels turning) shouldn't be troubling.  I agree that 55 mph is about tops, and it takes a good while to get there.

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11 hours ago, Peter S said:

"Ponderous" in the sense that it is a small engine in what looks like a fairly heavy body, though not obviously as large as the longer body Dodges or Desotos. I wouldn't expect it to take off like a jack rabbit from a stop sign, but probably takes a bit to get into motion. Expect an upper comfort zone limit around 55 MPH? And of course there's no pb or ps.

 

I've never owned a pre-war car, so my reference point would be something like a 1954 Chevy or the like.

Peter, I'd be surprised if you were disappointed in any way. That '54 Chev engine was primitive in many ways -- cast iron pistons, weak wrist pins. There may be a number of years difference between them, but most guys will tell you the Chrysler products are better engineered. Also, remember all flatheads have a lower profile, visually, and consequently, appear smaller. If you ever get a chance to see a '40s or earlier Hudson six engine, you'll wonder how it could possibly pull that big of a car.

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31 minutes ago, supercub said:

I like the car, the price is reasonable. It would barely fit in my garage though, it would be head to toe tight in there.

They're not a big car, less than 16 feet overall, right?

I'm surprised no one's made a move on it yet. 

Looks like the ex-Johnny Carson car that was in the now-defunct Imperial Palace car museum in Vegas for years.

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12 hours ago, suchan said:

They're not a big car, less than 16 feet overall, right?

I'm surprised no one's made a move on it yet. 

Looks like the ex-Johnny Carson car that was in the now-defunct Imperial Palace car museum in Vegas for years.

I know that he had a '39 Chrysler that belonged to his father. A few references about it on YouTube and elsewhere:

 

johnny carson 1939 chrysler - Google Search

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On 2/23/2021 at 10:43 PM, Peter S said:

I've always wanted one of these. Can anyone who's owned one remark on their roadability and the driving experience? seems like they might be on the ponderous side...

 

Try contacting @keithb7 on the forums.  He has a similar '38 Plymouth and is very familiar with how it drives.  You should also check out Keith's thread on the "Our Cars and Restoration Projects" forum.

 

 

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2 hours ago, neil morse said:

Nice car.  What am I seeing protruding from the dash just to the left of the instrument cluster?  An interior cooling fan?  I can't make it out.

They moved the ignition switch closer to the steering column for '39. We might be seeing fancy key chain, as well. Here's a pic from Google that gives a better look. The base model '39 Plymouth, whatever the model name was, still had the floor shift.

 

 

 

39plymouth27.JPG

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1 hour ago, Hudsy Wudsy said:

They moved the ignition switch closer to the steering column for '39. We might be seeing fancy key chain, as well. Here's a pic from Google that gives a better look. The base model '39 Plymouth, whatever the model name was, still had the floor shift.

 

Hudsy, I'm talking about this:

 

1932391081_39_plymoth(2)_LI.jpg.7583e605a65842c0a24441d61f1e4385.jpg

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8 minutes ago, Hudsy Wudsy said:

I'm sorry, Neil, I misunderstood. I could be way off, but the only thing that comes to mind is some possibly sort of supplemental windshield defogger.

 

No need to apologize.  I've never seen anything quite like it.  Anyone else have a guess?

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Hey thanks for calling me out to come here! I love participating in threads about these era Mopars. 
 

I do own a ‘38 Plymouth. If you want to check more details about the mechanical detials of this car see my you tube channel “Keith’s Garage” look for Mopar stuff. 
 

That car for $10K USD in my opinion is worthy of a good closer, thorough look.  My ‘38 was a $2800 buy. I could easily throw $10k at it and not be done. I am rebuilding an engine now for mine.  If that car were a coupe I guess it might be $25K? More? Coupes are nice but sedans are offer great value for the buyer. No so great for a seller.

 

My ‘38 came with a 1953 226 ci 25” length engine in it. I was happy with its performance. 3 speed. The sedans all seem to normally have the 4.11 rear end.  I am comfortable cruising at 50 mph. 55 is ok too but a little buzzy for my comfort and safety. In general I am shifting into 2nd before I get completely thru the average 4 way intersection. 

 

The stock 201 engine I’d wager, might me a little anemic. I’ll guess 40-45 mph cruising comfort, for me.  Keep in mind my experience and mechanical understanding dictates my comfort level. I have absolutely no desire to update engine power, brakes, tires, steering, and who knows what else, so I can cruise on interstates and keep up with traffic in a 80+ year old car. 
 

This ‘39 was designed and built for an era where most roads were dirt. 55 mph was not a sustainable speed for long trips. Road conditions were questionable for sure compared to today’s standards. In late ‘30s Mopar car you would have found yourself easily getting around a model T or Model A Ford ahead of you. 
 

My car is mainly a town cruiser however I do take it on the hiway now and then. 50-55 is not an issue on 4 lane divided roads. Single lane winding hiways? Pretty sure I’d have tail-gaters. I’d be pulling over to let the average person in a rush, go around me. 
 

I love my ‘38 sedan. Super easy to work on. The hydraulic, manual adjusting brakes are totally adequate. They perform well for the car’s performance and weight. A good tight syncho, and the tranny feels crisp and shifts well.  
 

I am currently rebuilding my 228 ci engine. Boring it out to 237 ci. I am really looking forward to the increased torque. I drive a steep grade hill home, every time I take my car out. At 228 ci, I never needed to down shift a gear at 11% grade. Gas pedal floored, I could maintain 30 mph, even faster when the engine is tuned well on a cool day.  I have no doubt the stock 201 engine would require 2nd gear. 
 

Any other questions I’d be happy to answer. Here’s a brief drive. I was attempting to showcase what average roads were like in the late 30’s. Looking at this and understanding why the car was designed, is why I feel its quite adequate. My suggestion is enjoy the car for what it is. What it was built to be and perform as. 
 


 

 

Edited by keithb7 (see edit history)
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Lots of fun, Keith. My first car (October '66) was a '38 Plymouth and riding along with you in your video sure takes me back. Thank you so much! You mention tailgaters. Geez, they really take the fun out of a little outing, don't they? My recollection is that sedans had 4:10 rear ends and coupes had 3:90s. Best of luck with your rebuild!

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This P7 Road King body style is the Body Code 115 5 passenger sedan of which 2,553 were built.  The Body Code 105 5 passenger touring sedan which has the larger built-in trunk sold 23,047 units.  For comparison, the P8 Deluxe Body Code 115 5 passenger sedan of which 2,279 were built.  The Body Code 105 5 passenger touring sedan which has the larger built-in trunk sold 175,054 units.  The Deluxe touring sedan is generally the most commonly available four door sedan now.

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1 hour ago, keithb7 said:

Here’s a brief drive. I was attempting to showcase what average roads were like in the late 30’s. Looking at this and understanding why the car was designed, is why I feel its quite adequate.

 

Nice re-creation, Keith.  One of my sons once looked at a B & W picture and said something like "Is what it was like when you were young - no colour?"   You've just confirmed that.

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My ride home from the hospital in 1943 was in my grandparents' '39 Plymouth 4-door.  It was traded on a '47 Pontiac, but since dad was home from the war, by then we had our own '46 Chevy coupe.  Car guy since age 10 days who wouldn't mind a Plymouth like this.  🙂

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2 hours ago, parrts said:

My ride home from the hospital in 1943 was in my grandparents' '39 Plymouth 4-door.  It was traded on a '47 Pontiac, but since dad was home from the war, by then we had our own '46 Chevy coupe.  Car guy since age 10 days who wouldn't mind a Plymouth like this.  🙂

Paarts, Plymouth to Pontiac to Chevie! What did your dad eventually settle on in later years?

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  • 2 weeks later...

I have a 39 Chrysler with OD I have been working on and it is a very comfortable ride at 55 MPH.  Well it was till the coil took a crap.  Waiting on a new one.  The early OD on these cars is pretty interesting. Mechanical drop to OD but electrical kick down to take it out.

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