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Wheeler Dealers featured a 1968 International Travelall


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Last week's Wheeler Dealers featured a 1968 International Travelall. Even with a full-line IHC dealer here Travelalls were rarely seen, though the neighbor across the road had a 1967 pickup.

 

Being a wagon guy, after seeing that episode I'm thinking I could enjoy one of those outsized station wagons. Then I think about limited supply of both Travelall and parts to fix them, and I come back down to Earth...

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A guy had one in original well used condition at a local show a couple of years ago. It was pretty basic, no tv screens in those things. I live in what was once a large farming community and we had IH dealer as well.  I can remember 1 travelall, a few pickup trucks and a few scouts. 

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25 minutes ago, rocketraider said:

Last week's Wheeler Dealers featured a 1968 International Travelall. Even with a full-line IHC dealer here Travelalls were rarely seen, though the neighbor across the road had a 1967 pickup.

 

Being a wagon guy, after seeing that episode I'm thinking I could enjoy one of those outsized station wagons. Then I think about limited supply of both Travelall and parts to fix them, and I come back down to Earth...

 

Aw, c'mon Glenn. Compared to finding parts for a 62 F85 wagon, that IH is like a Chebby.

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I had a customer that would send me his '67 Travelall every spring and I'd fix all the stuff so he and his wife could enjoy it during the summer, I would do a good deal of confidence testing before sending it back to them and I really enjoyed driving it.  It was all original, paint and everything, nobody had stuffed an 8 track in it or butchered it up.  Worst thing about them was the electrical, it was all harnesses daisy chained together and even brand new things like the highcurrent draw rear window motor wouldn't work and you had to retract the window to open the rear tailgate.  I had to add relays and sizeable wireing to get it reliable enough for them to use, they were older and I tried to really look out for them.  

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I live in an area where the hobby is large, and I've

never seen a Travelall at a show.  Were they reliable--

I infer from Mr. O. J. H. above that they weren't

great--and were they very rust-prone?

 

Here's a Travelall ad from 1963.  To my eyes,

it's rather a good-looking vehicle.

 

 

1963 International Travelall 2.jpg

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  • Peter Gariepy changed the title to Wheeler Dealers featured a 1968 International Travelall

I think Harvester made better tractors than they did vehicles, but based on the pickup the neighbor had the trucks were pretty tough. What took that truck off the road was the total unavailability of a lower radiator hose. Not even a Steve Ames "fit and function are acceptable" hose could be found. This was around 1980 barely 5 years after the end of production. A 1980 F150 replaced it. At the same age the Ford was a lot more beat-up than the International.

 

Another old farmer here had a 1960 B100 pickup so not like I'm unfamiliar with them.

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I had a 72 Travelall for a couple of years. It was tough as nails and the room inside it was huge. No problems with it and our IH dealer had good access to parts for it and the pickups in the mid 80's. We lived in a small farming community and lots of farmers had IH pickups and trucks because they were very durable, but they were mostly for work because of being heavy duty they were not for the average pickup owner. I think the reason so few seem to have survived is that they were purchased to work hard and usually used up before being traded in or most likely just parked in the farmers land and forgotten.

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21 minutes ago, rocketraider said:

What took that truck off the road was the total unavailability of a lower radiator hose.

 

Ah, the pre-interwebs days. RockAuto lists the lower hose (with your choice of three different suppliers) for about $17.

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We had a pretty large IH dealer in our town. They closed up a few years ago. I would venture to guess their shop is still packed to the rafters with original parts. Would be interesting to take a look.

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I owned a '74 pickup for a while and learned quite a bit about them; wouldn't mind owning another. Very heavy gauge steel for that era. I have some home movies I bought at a thrift store; a well-heeled family went on an African safari in the sixties, driving a Travelall. One of my favorite scenes has the guy walking across the hood to put something on the roof rack. I also have photos my father took when he went on a bear hunting trip in Canada c.1970, in a friends Travelall. Terrible mileage is what he recalls, and that's one of the main things you hear about them. A real hodgepodge of parts: mine had an AMC engine, vapor canister was Mopar, GM air pump, Holley carb. I think there was something Ford, maybe some of the glass was Carlite? Electrical problems are aggravated by the fact that nearly all the wires are green. Instead of different colors they printed numbers on the insulation, numbers I could never find while I was crawling under the dash. 

 

There's a good online community, though as expected it leans about 80/20 Scouts/everything else. There are some good vendors; I think Super Scout Specialists was the best I'd dealt with. There are more of those trucks out there than you might think, especially in some drier states out west. The sixties body is the 'C' series, 69-75 is 'D' series. I really like the styling of them both.

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I had a 74 pickup that had an engine swap when new, it got a diesel destined for a combine put in. 

The truck was used to pull a 5th wheel 40 ft log trailer on logging roads. The springs were so stiff it was like the seat was mounted right on the differential.

Top speed in 4th almost 55 , in 1st about 9. With twin fuel tanks plus one in the box it had around a 2,000 mile range. No one in their right mind would dare that.

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Wheeler-Dealers is kind of a love-hate particularly when no attention is paid to originality (Stewart Warner gauges in an MGA or you see Edd/Ant working on something underneath right next to rust. It is interesting that a wiring harness for a TR7 is available but was always more interested in a TR8 (Buick engine).

 

Is like other Discovery shows: five minutes of intro then break for commercials, one minute to repeat the first five and four minutes new. Break for the same commercials. One minute on something completely different and break for same commercials, one minute repeat & recap then four minute drive. Repeat same commercials. finally Mike and Byer gush about how wonderful it is while previews play. Lately all have incessant Picture-in-picture advertisements for "Discovery Plus $4.99/mo".

 

Phineas Taylor would be proud.

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Well Padgett- when have you seen any tv car show feature anything like a Travelall unless it was to gut the drivetrain and stick an LS swap in it? 🤮 Or worse transplant the body onto a late-model gm frame in the name of "reliability" and "convenience".🤮🤮

 

That's why I like WD. The Brits try to refurb or restore what's there. If there's a better part to improve on or correct what the original manufacturer installed they'll use it but they try to keep the car true to form. I like that they seek out craftsmen to fix what they can't do themselves.

 

And the show isn't one long commercial for whatever its sponsors are trying to sell. I can always hit mute button when the commercials come on.

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I had an earlier 1960's pickup for a while when I lived in Northern British Columbia for a year. Tough old thing but very bare bones. It fit right in to the local culture, forestry / mining town. A big 6 that looked like it belonged in something like a School Bus rather than a pickup , and a 4 speed. Manual everything. Steering was a real chore at minus 25, the lubricant in the steering box would almost go solid for 20 minutes or so until the exhaust and engine heat warmed it up.

 

Greg

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Wheeler Dealer is making another transition. They closed up their Southern California shop and are apparently headed back to the UK. 
Hopefully they will continue to entertain us.

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Although the show needs subtitles for us, like WD they show some detail the work that is done on the cars. Unlike many shows where a total wreck becomes a finished beauty during a long commercial. I suspect the Flipping Bangers guys would be right at home walking the Hershey swap meet.

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And the Citroen-Maserati SM. Think there were a few here but one I remember has a steering headlamp.

 

Seems like a disadvantage to remember new ones.

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On 2/23/2021 at 7:13 PM, rocketraider said:

Having trouble getting into that one. Proves that some Brits are into redneck engineering too, though I've no idea what a Brit redneck is called!😃

Chav 

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