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Finally got over my fear of putting my 1922 on a lift


Mark Kikta
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3 hours ago, Hubert_25-25 said:

Who needs a fancy lift when all you need is a chain fall.  The Sport Touring cars in the background look like they are sitting on A frames.  Most definitely pre OSHA.  

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Ok, now THAT I would have a fear of. 

 

"ok the transmission's all set, but the customer said his spare tire carrier wasn't bent when he came in" 

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I've used my 2 post lift on my 1917 D45 and my 1932 model 58.  I always use safety supports under each end when the car is up in the air.  The 32 Buick is a nuisance as the lift plates are too wide and interfere with exhaust and steering.  I use spacers without the plates and set them onto a rivet on the frame to prevent any slippage.  I also use it to lift only one end (with jack stands) for oil changes etc.  Creeper work is no fun any more.

 

Bob Engle

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18 hours ago, Hubert_25-25 said:

Who needs a fancy lift when all you need is a chain fall.  The Sport Touring cars in the background look like they are sitting on A frames.  Most definitely pre OSHA.  

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Hugh,  I have a similar  chain block but I dont think I'll be using it in that manner. They are very low geared with a low weight rating 1 ton from memory  Norm

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I got my Dykes manual out and educated myself on how to clean and adjust my brakes.  Here is a copy of what the Dykes says on adjusting the outer brakes. It had a diagram to go with the article as well.

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I learned a lot from the Dykes manual so I opened up the brakes and cleaned and lubed everything.  I realized there were six pins on the brake mechanism that were missing Carter pins, so I fixed that when I put them back together.  Hopefully they work better than they did previously.

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Gentlemen.......whenever you lift an early car up on a offset lift.........OPEN ALL THE DOORS! Prevents frame deflection from jamming the doors into the body...........a drive on lift is the only lift I will ever use on a non unibody car............but if your only option is a lift similar to the above.......open up all the doors.........best, Ed.

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PS......Never, EVER use silicone sealer on any pre war car............none, zero, nada. Permatex number two is fine. I don’t feel like typing ten pages why.

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I used hylomar blue except in the corners of the front seal.  It’s the best thing I have ever used. I will never use anything else again.  Stays flexible so cleanup if I ever do this again will be very easy.

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Check the long cast steel reaction arm that goes along the inboard rear side of the backing plate that holds the block for C/D in the Dyke pic.  Both my arms were cracked when I bought my car.  Took the expert welder from Buick Engineering in his home shop to grind grooves at the fracture and use the correct weld rod due to them being cast steel.  Still doing fine and that was 25 years ago.

 

The backing plate rivets were all loose too due to them doing the work of the cracked reaction arms.  Had to drill them all out and use larger grade 5 bolts and lock the nuts in place with a center punch. 

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Not the greatest pic.  I’ve marked up where mine were cracked. 
 

This is my spare rear axle assembly that resides under my 2500 Suburban for storage. I’m doing a one arm plank push up with the phone in the other to take this.  
 

You owe me Buick Brother.  Ha. 
 

There has to be a story why all the major donor parts off a 1923 Model 45 were painted red.  I just wish I knew it.  I bought the entire drivetrain from a guy doing a street rod conversation years ago. 

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Brian and Mark,

 

Is this a problem that is common only to the 1923 models?  I have the rear axle assembly out from under the car now, should I be checking this area over real close for any problems like what has been described here?  IF there should be any concerns, it would seem that this would be the time to look things over very closely.  Please advise.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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4 hours ago, Robert Engle said:

Interesting on the red paint. The 1918 chassis I got was all  painted red including the engine.

 

Bob Engle

I’m guessing ‘farmer’.  The paint is slopped on and thick like they were trying to protect things and had lots of red paint to spare and a mop of a brush. Heck, it worked. 

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You should be able to lock up both rear brakes and skid the tires on dry pavement.  That’s all you are going to get. 
 

I wasn’t kidding about the parking brake either.  It needs to work as well as the service brake and not be full of leaked axle lube.  When the bands are wet , like when you just wash your car, you will get to the end of the driveway and have nothing and will be reaching for that hand lever to stay out of the neighbors begonias. 

Edited by Brian_Heil (see edit history)
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